Journal for the Integrated Study of Dietary Habits
Online ISSN : 1881-2368
Print ISSN : 1346-9770
ISSN-L : 1346-9770
Volume 10 , Issue 3
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Masaaki Fuse
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 2-6
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Production and Properies of Xylooligosaccharide
    Shigeaki Fujikawa
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 7-14
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
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  • Osamu Negishi
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 15-19
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Koichi Kimoto
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 20-25
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tomoko Imai, Hiroko Sasaki, Tatsuyuki Sugahara
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 26-31
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    To study the effect of storage conditions, especially storage temperature, on maintaining the freshness of the cultivated mushrooms of Tricholomataceae, Enokitake (Flammulina velutipes), Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes) and Nioushimeji (Tricholoma giganteum), a freshness score was used to judge freshness.Also, the change in the compounds affecting the taste and sensory evaluation was measured.The results were as follows.Enokitake wrapped in a polypropylene film and Hatakeshimeji placed in a polystyrene tray and wrapped in a polyvinyl chloride film were kept fresh after storage for about 10 days at 25°C, for about 20 days at15°C and for about 60 days at 5°C.
    However, Nioushimeji wrapped in polyurethane could be stored for 10 days at 5°C and 25t, and for 25 days at 15°C.In Nioushimeji; low temperature injury was observed at 5°C
    The 5'-nucleotides, free sugars and sugar alcohols, organic acid contents and the sensory evaluation were not affected by storage.
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  • Makiko Takazawa, Akiko Yasui
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 32-38
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
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    Full ripe tomatoes were harvested in hothouses using organic and inorganic cultivations. The chemical constituent of the soils and tomatoes were analyzed, and a sensory test was conducted.The obtained results were as follows;
    1) Available nutrients were more abundant in the soil with organic cultivation than in that with inorganic cultivation.
    2) Tomatoes from the organic cultivation contained higher concentrations of ash, magnesium, phosphorus, organic acid and nitrous acid than that from the inorganic cultivation.However calcium, vitamin C and sucrose (brix) were less abundant.The contents of total ash, magnesium and phosphorus in the tomatoes were affected by the soil components, except for total calcium.
    3) The nitrate-nitrogen concentration of the soil showed a positive correlation to the nitrous acid in the tomatoes.We suggested that vitamin C in the tomatoes decreased due to nitrous acid.
    4) The red color of the organically grown tomatoes was deeper than that of the inorganically grown ones.The red color and amount of vitamin C had a negative correlation (r=-0.524 p<0.05).
    5) A paired difference test revealed that inorganically grown tomatoes were higher than organically grown ones with respect to sweetness and overall evaluation.
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  • Youngmi Choi, Hiroko Sasaki, Mutsuko Matsuzawa, Hideo Kawai, Tatsuyuki ...
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 39-50
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to clarify the properties of Chinese Mineral Water, the various mineral contents, were determined and consumption of potassium permanganate, inorganic anions, volatile halogenated hydrocarbons, the number of viable aerobes and their genus level were determined for the sanitary properties.
    (1) Chinese Mineral Water had more minerals contents than Japanese or Korean Mineral Water but lower than European Mineral Water. The distribution of hardness of the Chinese Mineral Water is similar to that of European Mineral Water of which the hardness is high.
    (2) The average consumption of potassium permanganate was 1.33mg/l.
    (3) Based on the K-index and 0-index, which means the taste of water, 38. 5% of the Chinese Mineral Water was judged to have a good taste.
    (4) The contents of the inorganic anions and volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in 35 samples did not exceed the Japanese regulation limit, except fluorine ion of one sample.
    (5) On the number of viable aerobes, half of the samples had under one hundred viable aerobes per lml and by the identification at the genus level, the genus Vibrio, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Xanthomonas, Micrococcus, Stapylococcus, Leuconostocwere observed.
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  • A Comparison between Japan and England
    Kazuko Okuda, Allan Hackett
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 51-58
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Today's world is in need of independence of food and self-management ability of A study was conducted on the kitchen job of public and private junior high school students from 12 to 15 years old in Japan and England. The results were as follows
    (1) The frequency of help of Japanese adolescents'kitchen job, for example, shopping, cleaning the table and preparing a dish, was very low. Their self-reliance was lower than that of English. Japanese helped a part of kitchen jobs such as includ setting a table. Many young Japanese do not have their special dishes. However, English students can attain their objects and feel happy at kitchen job because they have to do a series of job. It was clear that students, who were able to help very well one of kitchen jobs such as shopping, cleaning a table and cooking, could help other jobs with chain react ion.
    (2) Adolescents who help cooking because of “like cooking help setting a table, have a special dish and practice good table manner.
    (3) While a half of Japanese (both boys and girls) recognized that in” women have to do kitchen job, English adolescents understood “both men and women have to do”, especially women insisted on this point. The consciousness of the duties was very different between the two nations.
    The results of English students gave us many suggestions. We hope Japanese adolescents are able to stand more by themselves.
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  • Noriko Inoue, Koujun Tsunoda, Tatsuyuki Sugahara
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 59-63
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Oysters have to be cleaned using sterilized seawater so that they may be eaten raw.
    We studied the effect of adding hypochlorous acid (HCIO) to sterilize the seawater on oysters. Oysters with shells and without shells were prepared. Half of them were kept in seawater containing 2 3μg/ml of Cl2, while the other half was kept in seawater without HCIO as the control. All changes were observed and the dehydrogenase activity on the oyster's gills for 5 days (with shells) and for 48 hours (without shells) was measured.
    In the seawater containing HClO, the gills of oysters with shells became loose after 3 days. Oysters without shells looked smaller due to the HClO after 24 hours. The dehydrogenase activity of the oysters in contact with the HClO, both with shells and without shells, decresased 70-90% compared to the control.
    Although the oysters were not killed by the 2 3μg/ml remaining Cl2, their gills were damaged. Since the gill's breathing helps oysters to be clean, the effect of clean up is thought to be reduced by the treatment.
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  • Kazuya Iwai, Yoshiharu Nakabayashi, Koki Fujita, Yukiko Negishi, Yoshi ...
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 64-75
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effects of the ingestion of powdered coffee containing galactosylsucrose (LS) on defecation, fecal condition and microflora in healthy volunteers were investigated and compared with those of placebo powdered coffee. The subjects were given one pack of placebo powdered coffee (total 16g, without LS) daily for one week (control phase), and not fed any powdered coffee for the next week (blank phase). They were then given one pack of LS-powdered coffee (total 16g, LS 2.2g) daily for two weeks. The fecal microflora on the samples of 8 subjects who were randomly selected from 50 subjects were analyzed.
    The number of days with defecation per week was significantly increased by the ingestion of LS-powdered coffee as compared with the non-ingestion in the group although a significant effect was not expressed in comparison with the control phase. The fecal conditions such as volume, shape and hardness feeling were significantly improved by the ingestion of LS-powdered coffee as compared with those of the non-ingestion (p<0.05) and placebo powdered coffee (p<0.05) group (n=19) that also had some slight constipation. The ratio of beneficial microbes, Bifidobacterium, to anaerobes was significantly increased from32.7%to45.9%, respectively, by the LSpowdered coffee ingestion as compared with those of the non-ingestion (p<0.05) and placebo powdered coffee (p<0.05) group. These results demonstrate that the ingestion of powdered coffee (16g) containing galactosylsucrose (2.2g) increases the days with defecation per week, improves the fecal conditions such as volume, shape and hardness feeling and promotes the beneficial proliferation of intestinal microbes in volunteers, in particular, those with slight constipation.
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  • In the Area of Kotou
    Fumiko Hayakawa
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 76-80
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The range for the custom of eating rice gruel made with tea in Kanzaki-gun Notogawa-cho and Gokasyou--cho, Gamou-gun Hino--cho and Ryuou-cho in the Kotou area of Shiga prefecture was investigated. These areas are located in the Kotou plains, east of Lake Biwa, and are the birthplaces of OUMI SHONIN. The investigation method was done by hearing about the custom of eating rice gruel made with tea from persons of advanced age.
    1. The persons in these areas lived in ease and comfort.
    2. They had the custom of eating rice gruel made with salted and dried ume, perilla, ginger, dried orange peel, and black soybean in addition to tea leaves. This rice gruel was called Gomame Tyagayu, Gokaitya, Mametya, and Mamezya.
    3. They have eat them with the aim of not catching colds in the winter season.
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  • Especially EPA, DHA and the Taurine content
    Takako Aoki, Tatsuyuki Sugahara
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 81-100
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper, we describe the change in the nutritional ingredients such as the proximate composition, minerals, free amino acid, cholesterol, fatty acid composition, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content when cooking using various methods of heating for 7 kinds of fish. The obtained results are as follows:
    1. When cooking fillets:
    As the decrease in the moisture content was remarkable, the mineral, taurine, EPA and DHA contents apparently increased.
    2. When cooking the whole fish:
    1) The fish with a low lipid content (equal to or less than 5%) As the decrease in the moisture content was greater than the exudation or elution of the lipid, the increases in the EPA and DHA contents were recognized by the apparent increase in the lipid content, but the taurine content decreased. In case of the frying due to the substitution of frying oil and the fish oil, the EPA and DHA contents decreased about 50%. The taurine content also decreased.
    2) The fish with a high lipid content (equal to more than 17%)
    As the exudation or elution of the lipids was remarkable and the moisture content apparently increased, the taurine content had a tendency to increase during broiling, but the EPA and DHA contents decreased about 50%.
    3) The fish with a lipid content between 1) and 2).
    Both the exudation or elution of lipids and the decrease in the moisture showed the tendency of decreased EPA, DHA and taurine. This tendency was significant during broiling.
    Polyunsaturated fatty acid was made unstable by the heat and light, but no significant difference in the fatty acid composition was recognized just after general cooking. However, a remarkable difference in the absolute quantity of EPA and DHA was recognized due to the cooking method or lipid content during the fishing season.
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  • Chieko Ohya
    1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 101-105
    Published: December 31, 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The results of a survey on general images for local dishes of Yamagata Prefecture by SD (semantic differential) method and factor analysis are as follows;
    (1) Four basic factors were sampled as the general image for local dishes;cooking quality (simplicity and nostalgia), affinity, aroma and taste, physical properties. These four factors the rate of cumulative attribution was 71.3%.
    (2) Aa a result of a multiple regression analysis, the preferences with the most influence were familiarity and affinity, cooking quality (simplicity and nostalgia), aroma and taste, physical properties.
    (3) The study revealed how the above factors relate to the local dishes of Yamagata prefcture and made it possible to classify into six groups.
    These six groups were classified by three dimensions; Nostalgia groups were Nato soup, Sobagaki, Happai soup, Dongara soup and Zappa soup. Unfamiliarity groups were Locust boiled down in soy, Udos soup, Butterbur flower with pounded sesame and soy bean, Cod roe boiled down in sugar and soy, Akebis boiled with green soybean dressing and Carp soup.
    Affinity groups were Imoni, Tamakonjak, Kakimochi, etc. Sweetness groups were sweet cooked fish and carp. Aroma groups were Perilla rice, Mottenohoka sweetened vinegar, Salmon sushi, Ukogi rice, etc. Stickiness groups were Tochimochi, Jindanmochi, Kujiramochi and Taromochi, etc.
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  • 1999 Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 106
    Published: 1999
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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