Journal for the Integrated Study of Dietary Habits
Online ISSN : 1881-2368
Print ISSN : 1346-9770
ISSN-L : 1346-9770
Volume 8 , Issue 1
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Akihiro Hino
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 2-8
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technique is expected to bring about a great progress in the improvement of breeding technology and the development of new plant varieties showing high quality and high yield, such as those with excellent pest and disease resistances, those with environmental stress tolerance, etc. In the USA, a late ripening tomato variety (FLAVR SAVRTM) developed through the rDNA technology was commercialized as the world's first recombinant food in 1994. Seven transgenic crop plants, such as herbicide tolerant soybean and canola, insect resistant corn and potato, were complied the all safety assessments with the guidelines required and they are marketable in Japan.
    General public, however, are not familiar with rDNA technology, and some seem to feel uncomfortable with biotechnology. It is caused by the difficulty of the technology and lacking of sufficient information. In order to promote agricultural biotechnology, it is important to give precise information about rDNA technology to general public so that they can comfortably accept biotechnology and the products. Because, the rDNA technique is an most important technology to improve world's food supply and global environment in the next century.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 9-16
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 17-25
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 26-31
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 32-35
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tomoko Kimura, Tatsuyuki Sugahara, Yoko Fukuya, Hiroko Sasaki
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 36-41
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Hot water extractions accompanied with and without ultrasonication were attempted during the heating process in the preparation of chicken-bone soup stock and the changes in the contents of 9 mineral components in the soup were investigated. In addition, the relationship between the mineral components of chicken-bone soup stock and taste components and optimum preparation conditions were examined
    1) In the soup prepared by the method with ultrasonication, each content of 9 mineral components was higher than in the soup prepared without ultrasonication, indicating that the former soup was more nutrient as a natural food substance.
    2) The extraction of mineral components increased dependently upon temperature for Ca, Mg and Na and upon time for P, K and Zn. Thus, the changes in extractable amounts were different among these mineral components.
    3) For the treatment with ultrasonication at 98 °c for 30 minutes resulting in the best evaluation in the sensory test, the extracted amount was larger by 5-43% for Ca, Mg, P, Na and Fe, and nearly equal for K, Mn, Zn and Cu compared to the treatment without ultrasonication for 90 minutes. In addition, synergistic effects were found with taste components such as glu and 5'-IMP, indicating a close agreement with the results from the sensory evaluation.
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  • Hiroko Mine, Sakie Tamura
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 42-48
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We investigated the consciousness and actual response of 415 college students concerning table setting for daily meals using questionnaires. The results are as follows:
    It was observed that they were not very particular about the table setting in their daily lives. They preferred their free style of setting to the traditional Japanese table setting due to its convenience. It was also observed that their consciousness and behavior could be changed by teaching the traditional form of Japanese table setting.
    We consider that this change in their preference has been caused by the inlfuence ot the incoming flux of foreign cultures and the remarkable growth of the food service industry. Moreover, there is also a gradual decline in the teaching the traditional table setting in families where new changes have taken place in the member relationship.
    Today, much of our life style is influenced by Western cultures and our living condition have been changed. The fixed form of table setting long observed as an ancient custom is no longer acceptable to new generations of rationalists.
    Therefore, if we believe that the traditional form of table setting is worth keeping, it is necessary to reconsider the current education in schools.
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  • Chizuko Hotta
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 49-53
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Fumiko Hayakawa
    1997 Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 54-57
    Published: July 31, 1997
    Released: January 31, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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