Journal of the Japanese Society for Horticultural Science
Online ISSN : 1880-358X
Print ISSN : 0013-7626
ISSN-L : 0013-7626
Volume 19 , Issue 3-4
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • S. MATSUI, N. MURATA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 161-167
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1. For the purpose of selecting suitable varieties for marrons glacés, twenty five varieties were tested in laboratory and cannery during the three years from 1947 to 1949.
    2. The ratio of outer skin and inside peel to the whole weight of nuts showed considerable difference among these varieties, and consequently there were much variations in the percentage of edible portion, ‘Rihei’ was the highest in edible portion (80%), while ‘Konishiki’ the lowest (64.9%).
    3. The results of analytical investigations sho-wed that moisture content of chestnut flesh was very different between each varieties but it was about 60% in most cases. Contents of crude starch in nut flesh ranged from 27 to 40%.
    As to sugar contents, there was more cane-sugar content than reducing sugar in most varieties, lexcepting ‘Chuwase’ and ‘Nakate Tamba’
    4. Large nut varieties tested were not available for marrons glacés; while among middle nut varieties ‘Chuwase’, Akachu' and ‘Obuse No. 2’ were suitable for this purpose.
    5. Products made of Chinese varieties (Castanets mollissima BLUME) were somewhat harder in texture and smaller in size than those of Ja-panese varieties (C. crenata SIEB. et ZUCC.).
    Accordingly the latter seems to be more suitable for marrons glacés than the former.
    6. For making marrons glacés of high quality it is primarily important to use perfectly mature nuts and to cook them as soon as possible after harvesting.
    Immature nuts are not suitable for this purpose and long stored nuts give dark color on products.
    7. Winding threads around the peeled nuts is remarkably effective in preventing the cracking that occurs in the proceessing, and it may be commercially advisable method in large nut varieties in spite of troublesome work.
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  • S. WATANABE
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 168-176
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • S. TANAKA, S. NAKAMURA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 177-184
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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    The authors carried out studies on the morpho-logical and physiological characters of the causal fungus of citrus melanose in Japan, and particu-larly its pathogenicity during the year 1948 and 1949. Results of the experiments are summarized as follows.
    1. Several strains of the causal fungus were collected from the various growing centers of the Satsuma orange such as in Shizuoka, Kanagawa, and Wakayama prefectures. After cultural and inoculation experiments they were all identified to be the same species. Strain No. 1 was isolated from a dead twig of Satsuma orange in the citrus grove of the Tokai Horticultural Experiment Station, Okitsu, and used as the type specimen in the present experiments.
    2. By the natural and artificial infection, the causal organism caused symptoms of relanose on fruits, leaves and twigs, and also stem end rot on fruits and die back of twigs.
    3. The fungus showed vigorous mycelial growth and abundant sporulation on potato decoction agar, vigorous mycelial growth but poor sporulation on such media as soy agar, corn meal agar, CZAPECK's synthetic ager and HOPKINS' synthetic agar. While both mycelial growth and sporulation were scanty on apricot decoction agar.
    4. Optimum temperature for mycelial growth of this fungus is approximately 27-28°C, maximum about 34°C and minimum 7-8°C.
    5. Optimum hydrogenion concentration for mycelial growth is about 6 in pH value.
    6. According to the inoculation experiments and field observations, , the fruits of Natsudaidai, grapefruit, navel orange and lemon are susceptible to the present fungus.
    7. The infection occurred on citrus fruits con-tinuously from June to October when fruits were almost matured, although BURGER and others (5, 21, 27) did not recognize the infection on rather young fruits 4 to 6 weeks after the petal fall. While citrus leaves acquired immunity one month after sprouting.
    8. From the anatomical study and bagging experiment in the grove, it was recognized that the causal fungus invades citrus fruits through stomata and cuticle, increasing the cuticular infection in later season.
    9. Considering the results of the present investigation, the authors recognize the causal fungus of citrus melanose in Japan is identical to Diaporthe citri (FAWCETT) WOLF (Phomopsis citri FAW)
    10. Seasonal difference of infection between Japanese and American citrus seems to depend mainly on the difference of climatic conditions.
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  • Y. MORITA, K. YONEYAMA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 185-194
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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    1. Young apple, chestnut, persimmon (D. Lotus Linn.) seedlings and grape cuttings were planted in 4-litre, 8cm deep glazed porcelain crocks. Soil moisture was regulated every day, to 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50%, of dry weight of soil by watering the volume of water lost during the day.
    After shoot growth of the seedlings was measured at 5 days intervals, these seedlings were investigated on the top and root fresh weight and leaves of every plot were analysed. Some of the another seedlings were dried to wilting and not watered to scorching of leaves.
    2. Soil moisture in which the leaves showed definite wilting was 7.3% for apple trees, 9.3% for chestnut, 9.0% for persimmon and 5.6% for grapes and soil moisture showing no increasing of top growth was 15% (39% of water capacity) for apple trees and 10% (2_??_% of water capacity) for chestnut, persimmon and grape. Grape showed proper growth at the 20% as peach seedlings of previous study and also chestnut made compara tively proper top growth at the same soil moisture percentage.
    Optimum soil moisture of the top growth was from 20 to 40% for grape and from 30 to 40% (79-105% of water capacity) for another trees studied but latter top growth was superior in 30% to 40% soil moisture. At 50% top growth gradually decreased and leaf color turned pale and yellowish by injury of excessive soil moisture.
    3. The roots production of grape was best in 20% soil moisture, in which apple and persimmon roots were less than half of these in 30% soil moisture, but chestnut roots in 20% actually weighed same with those in 30%.
    In general, root growth was superior to top growth in drying soil moisture and the top and root ratio showed smaller as the soil moisture more decreased.
    Though the growth of the trees was vigorous in 30-40%, the amount of growth, except chestnut, was more in 30%. Moreover, blackening and partial death of root tips and appearance of lenticels and decrease of white new roots were slightly found in 40% soil moisture as 50% soil moisture in which those unprofitable abnormalities were very remarkable.
    Nitrogen content of apple, chestnut and persimmon leaves was highest in 20% soil moisture but grape leaves only showed the exceptional nitrogen content shown in Fig. 7.
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  • K. SAITO
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 195-199
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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    Several new tetraploid annual flower plants which were induced by colchicine treatment in 1949 are summarized as follows:
    _??_
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  • M. OKADA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 200-204
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • H. MYODO
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 205-208
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • S. KAWATA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 209-220
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • T. TATEBE
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 221-224
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • H. OGASAWARA, S. NAKAYA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 225-228
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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    (1) Controlling climatic factors for sweet potato yield in Iwate, are temperature in June, temperature and sun shine duration in July, and temperature, sun shine duration and amount of rainfall in September and October.
    (2) The amount of rainfall in all growing period and the yield are closely related, and the regression equation by method lor least squares is as follows; y=848.4-0.34x
    (3) The land temperature of every month and the yield are closely related; besids the land temperature in planting date, early or late of time which become 16.5°C, are very important.
    (4) Although the single correlation coefficients are not significant, it is significant the multiple correlation coefficient of temperature with sun shine duration in planting date and fresh root differentiate date to the yield. And the-many climatic factors in the two dates constitute the organic relationes for each others.
    (5) The correlation coefficient between the first. frosted day and the yield is not significant (+0.437); but the correlation of first frosted day-e to•rice yield is significant (+0.627*)
    (6) Generally, the sun shine duration in connection with the amount of rainfall and the temperature control the yield of sweet potato, and it is most abominable phenomenon for the sweet potato cultivating in this country, the Reigaigata climatic condition which usually spoken on rice cultivating in the country.
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  • K. OGATA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 229-233
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • Y. IWASAKI, Y. TANAKA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 234-238
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • R. KOSUGI
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 239-244
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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    1. In order to determine the methods of winter forcing in gladioli, the experiments were taken place at the Agricultural Institute of Yokohama National University from 1949 to 1950.
    2. The most superior plot in flowering percentage was 1% E. C.: 5 hours dip, then kept at 26°C. for 16 days. The next were the plots kept at 26°C. for 16 days, then 0.05% E. C.: 1/2 hour dip, and at 26°C. for 17 days then 1 ppm 2, 4-D: 4 hours dip.
    3. In every case, check and treated, the period opened the first flower was between 86 and 92 days.
    4. It seems to the writer that the temperature 26°C. was not sufficient to break the rest period of the variety (Kunder'd White), if it was not treated.
    5. In all the roots sprouted fairly well.
    6. The most inferior in flowering percentage was the E. C. vapor treatment, apperently injured from the chemical.
    (E. C. Ethylen Chlorhydrin)
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  • K. MIURA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-248
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • K. HAGIYA
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 249-251
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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  • S. RAI
    1950 Volume 19 Issue 3-4 Pages 252-254
    Published: December 31, 1950
    Released: December 19, 2008
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