Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 10 , Issue 1
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Akiteru AMIMOTO, Michinobu NOGUCHI, Hisae HACHIMURA, Masashi NAKANO, K ...
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 1-7
    Published: 2001
    Released: March 23, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Impacted teeth were treated by exposure through gingival incision or gingivectomy, surgical orthodontic movement, or extraction at 54 sites in 40 dogs, depending on the etiology and symptomatology. Some dogs were placed under observation without treatment. Favorable results were obtained after treatment in 20 (76.9%) of the 26 dogs that underwent conservative procedures other than extraction within 12 months after birth. It is important to diagnose and treat inpacted teeth appropriately as early as possible, by 2 to 3 months of age for deciduous teeth and 4 to 7 months of age for permanent teeth. When teeth appear to be missing, radiological examinations are required to differentiate impacted teeth from missing teeth.
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  • Kazuaki TAKASHIMA, Shizuo YAMAGATA, Shigeki NAKANIWA, Yoshihisa YAMANE
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 9-18
    Published: 2001
    Released: March 23, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ophthalmic solution, 0.1% pranoprofen, was used to clinical cases with diseases of external ocular inflammation in dogs. In this trial, 0.1% pranoprofen was administered to 167 clinical cases that had been diagnosed as conjunctivitis, keratitis, or blepharitis. Efficacy was ascertained in 152 dogs, and safety, in 160. The symptoms were cured in 79.6% of the dogs, and ameliorated in 92.8%. Four dogs showed slight side effects. From these results, this medicine was judged as very effective and safe for external ocular inflammation in dogs.
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Case Report
  • Nobuyuki SHIRANAGA, Tadahisa MASHITA, Tetsuya SHIMODA
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 19-22
    Published: 2001
    Released: March 23, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A six-year-old female golden retriever weighing 28.6kg was brought in, unable to sit up straight, with sudden and serious tachypnea. Body temperature was 39.1°C, and tendon reflex was weak. The mucosal membranes were suffused markedly. An enlarged spleen was seen on rediographs. Blood chemistry tests showed remarkable increase of red blood cells, highly concentrated hemoglobin, and a higt value of PCV, although there ware no signs of dehydration. A diagnosis of polycythemia was made, and phlebotomy was performed twice letting 700ml of blood each. The procedure was drastically effective. Then, to find out what had caused the disase, several different kinds of tests including bone marrow tests were done. There were no disorders in the respiratory system, circulation system, or internal organs such as the kidneys. The level of serum erythropoietin was in a normal range, but vitamin B12 level was higher than normal and 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate (2, 3-DPG) was lower than normal. On the basis of these findings and hematological results, the possibility of secondary polycythemia was ruled out, and polycythemia vera was definitely diagnosed. On the 7th day, the dog was discharged from our hospital, and is now under control by medication.
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  • Keiichi FUJITA, Masami TONOKURA, Sachiko HANADA, Hiroyuki TAKAYANAGI, ...
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 23-26
    Published: 2001
    Released: March 23, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A five-year-old female yorkshire terrier brought in for scaling, and a-five-year-old male miniature dachshund with the right infraorbital abscess were found to have decay on the occlusal region of the maxillary first molar tooth. Both affected teeth had pulp necrosis, lack of clinical crown, and periapical lesion, so we chose to extract them, because of the difficulty of repair. The postoperative progress of each dog was satisfactory. Histopathologically, the affected teeth were diagnosed as carious. These cases are rather rare, because carnivoraous animals such as dogs and cats have seldom been reported to have caries. In fact, we seldom encounter such patients in daily clinical work.
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Teaching Report
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