Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 16 , Issue 2
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
Review Article
Original Article
  • Tohru FUKASE
    2007 Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 35-40
    Published: 2007
    Released: February 12, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In three dogs infested by fleas and not satisfactory treated with a fipronil or an imidacloprid product, flea specimens were collected and identified as the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis. Drug-sensitivity of each isolate of the fleas was evaluated to permethrin, fipronil and imidacloprid by in vitro knockdown tests, and it was revealed that each isolate was very insensitive to the drug that had been used for the treatment. The fleas on the 3 dogs were then completely eliminated with a drug to which each flea isolate was sensitive at in vitro evaluations.
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  • Takuo SHIDA, Takuya MARUO, Asae MORI, Hiroko KAWAMURA, Haruo TAKEDA, Y ...
    2007 Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 41-45
    Published: 2007
    Released: February 12, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We retrospectively reviewed giant thymomas in 9 dogs, which were satisfactorily treated by high-energy, hypo-fractionated, multi-portal X-ray irradiation. The average number of irradiation doses was 4: twice in 1 case, 3 times in 3 cases, and 4 times in the remaining 5 cases. The average dose was 10 Gy: the doses ranged from 5 to 12. The average total dose given to one animal was 35 Gy: the doses ranged 21 to 44 Gy. The average number of irradiation ports was 5, ranging from 2 to 9. After irradiation, respiratory symptoms were improved in 5 cases out of 6. Hypercalcemia was seen in 7 cases, but all returned to nomal 1 week after radiotherapy. The average survival time after radiation was 208 days. Regarding adverse effects, dermatitis was seen only in 1 case, and it was probably because multiple-field irradiation reduced undesirable exposure of normal tissues. These findings show that radiotherapy by high-energy, hypo-fractionated, multi-portal X-ray irradiation can alleviate canine giant thymoma safely and effectively.
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Case Report
  • Nozomi SHIRAKAWA, Kazuaki TAKASHIMA, Tomonori KATAOKA, Junka NOYAMA, T ...
    2007 Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 47-49
    Published: 2007
    Released: February 12, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A five-year-old, male, domestic rabbit was referred to us with a tumor-like mass in the abdominal subcutaneous tissues. The mass was left untreated in spite of our advice. Two months later the size of the mass had doubled. Although the mass adhered to the abdominal wall, we were able to remove it surgically. The rabbit recovered, but died 37 days later from respiratory arrest during the repair of an accidental bone fracture. Histopathologically, the tumor turned out to be a malignant fibrous histiocytoma measuring 70×70×65 mm.
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  • Masato FUJIMURA
    2007 Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 51-55
    Published: 2007
    Released: February 12, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An Akita dog with atopic dermatitis caused by allergy to pollen and house dust mites was successfully treated by nine-year continuous hyposensitization. This is the longest case ever reported of hyposensitization without a break. The disease developed at the age of 18 months, when the first intradermal test was done. The dog had a positive reaction to such antigens as house dust mites, mugwort, velvet grass, dandelion, ragweed, 7-grass mix, Japanese cedar pollen. On the whole the treatment was effective during the period, and no adverse reaction was observed.
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