Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 23 , Issue 2
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
Special Contribution
Orijinal Article
  • Makiko NITTA, Masashi YUKI
    2016 Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 59-65
    Published: June 20, 2016
    Released: February 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The results of complete blood count and blood chemical analysis were compared between 164 tumor-bearing dogs and 26 clinically healthy dogs as a control. The dogs with a tumor were sorted into five groups;group 1: dogs with benign epithelial tumors; group 2: dogs with malignant epithelial tumors such as malignant mammary gland tumor and malignant melanoma; group 3: dogs with benign mesenchymal tumors; group 4: dogs with malignant mesenchymal tumors such as hemangiosarcoma; and group 5 :dogs with round cell tumors such as lymphoma and mast cell tumor. Further, the dogs with six major tumors were grouped separately, and their blood data were calculated individually. Namely, group A consisted of the dogs with benign mammary gland tumors, group B, the dogs with malignant mammary gland tumors, group C, those with malignant melanomas, group D, those with hemangiosarcomas, group E, those with lymphomas, and group F, those with mast cell tumors. The red cell count was significantly decreased in groups 5, D, and E. Hb and PCV were significantly decreased in groups 2, 4, 5, C, D and E. The white blood cell count and segmented neutrophil count were significantly increased in groups 2, 4, 5, B, D and E. The platelet count was significantly increased in group 2, and the platelet count was significantly decreased in group D. Glb, ALP, Ca and CRP were significantly increased in groups 2, 4, 5, B, and F. LDH was significantly increased in group E. This study suggested that routine blood tests might provide useful information for diagnosis of tumors.
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  • Mina MIZUKOSHI, Natsumi OKUMURA, Kaori IKEGAKI, Takuya YOGO
    2014 Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 66-71
    Published: June 20, 2014
    Released: February 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We designed three types of walking aids for blind dogs which could easily fit on the head of any dog breed, using commercially available materials; they consisted of a snood and fillers. Six blind dogs including large-breeds were fitted with one of our newly designed devices, and its ease of walking was observed. Then each pet owner took the dog home, had it wear the device for a week, and answered a questionnaire. Most dogs could evade most obstacles. The snood could be fixed well on 5 dogs, but the fitness depended on the form of the head and the position of the ears. The quality of the dog’s hair also affected the fitness. Next problem is which material and what kind of feelers should be used, especially for large breeds.
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Cace Report
  • Mie IHARA, Hiroyuki KADONO, Takashi KITAO, Satoshi KITAO
    2014 Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 72-75
    Published: June 20, 2014
    Released: February 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A neuter female cat with dysuria was suspected to suffer from urethral stricture. The presence of a firmly constricted lesion, which was approximately 1 cm, in the urethral lumen inside the pelvic cavity was confirmed by an ischial ostectomy. The urethra was resected about 2 cm in length including the constricted lesion, and the end of the resected urethra was anastomosed to the cervical stump of the previously ovaliohysteretomized uterus, instead of the end of the resected distal urethra. Before the urethroplasty, the luminal passage of the uterus was secured by removing surrounding connective tissue from the previous ovariohysterectomy. Microscopically, a urethral transitional cell carcinoma was found in the lesion. In this case, urethroplasty using urethrovaginal anastomosis could improve dysuria and the quality of life of the cat.
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  • Tadashi MIYAMOTO, Eriko SHIMADA, Yui KIMURA, Mai KAKUMOTO, Akina MIYAM ...
    2016 Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 76-78
    Published: June 20, 2016
    Released: February 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Global rapid increases of methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) is a serious problem to treat dogs and cats. No report on MRSIG in ferrets has been reported up to now. A four-year-old ferret was brought to us with the chief complaints of frequent urination and hematuria, and MRSIG was isolated from its urine. The isolated MRSIG was resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cephalexin, cefdinir, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, ofloxacin, and fosfomycin ; it was susceptible to doxycycline and chloramphenicol. Enrofloxacin, which was given to the ferret at first, was not effective, but doxycycline was effective. As this case showed, we need to consider the possibility of MRSIG infections in ferrets.
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  • Hikaru OGAYA, Masaaki KATAYAMA, Tatsuya SATO, Jun KAWAMATA, Yasuhiko O ...
    2014 Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 79-84
    Published: June 20, 2014
    Released: February 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A six-year-old castrated american shorthair cat was brought to us with the main complaint of hydronephrosis of the left kidney. Radiography and ultrasonography revealed dilatation of the left renal pelvis and proximal ureter, and the presence of a urolith in the right renal pelvis. Suspecting obstruction of the left ureter, we performed intravenous urography, but the contrast images were unclear. Therefore, antegrade pyelography from the left kidney was performed. This showed partial obstruction of the left ureter by uroliths, and identified the sites of these uroliths. The uroliths were successfully removed by ureterotomy, and the cat has been in good condition without any urinary problems for one year after surgery. From this, antegrade pyelography was thought to be effective in diagnosing ureterolithiasis and localization of uteliths.
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