Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 22 , Issue 2
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Special Contribution
Orijinal Article
  • Shogo TANNO, Kazuaki TAKASHIMA, Tsuyoshi YAMANE, Yoshihisa YAMANE
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 49-52
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Six-month-old and eleven-month-old mixed-breed cats which had ingested dry squid accidentally were referred because of vomiting to Kurayoshi Animal Medical Center. Both cats showed increased serum creatinine concentration, which was measured by DRI-CHEM7000V. We treated them with subcutaneous transfusion and an antiemetic drug. The following day, serum creatinine concentration had returned to normal, and the clinical symptoms had improved. Separately, we examined changes in serum creatinine concentrations in two other healthy adult cats after being given squid. The cats also vomited, and their serum creatinine concentrations were measured by two methods, that is, the DRI-CHEM7000V and an enzyme method which is reported as more accurate. The values of serum creatinine concentration measured by the DRI-CHEM7000V were similar to those of the above-mentioned cats. But the values measured by the enzyme method were normal. Therefore, increased serum creatinine concentration in the cats after eating dry squid accidentally might be false.
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  • Nobuaki ARAI, Daisuke NAKAMARU, Yasushi HARA, Masahiro TAGAWA
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 53-60
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Steroid therapy, a common treatment for canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), is effective in suppressing pruritus, but many side effects caused by long-term administration of steroids have been reported. In contrast, hyposensitization therapy (allergen-specific immunotherapy) is recommended as the only treatment that can encourage natural healing of allergy in the WHO Position Paper, and is regarded as the best long-term therapy for CAD, in the veterinary field in Europe and the United States of America. In this paper, we expressed drug treatments and clinical symptoms numerically using Hillier’s symptom/medication scores, recorded the effects of dose reduction of steroid on the clinical symptoms 13 months after treatment and one month prior to treatment, and compared the results. We used 11 dogs suffering from CAD which had been controlled by steroid therapy. We achieved significant dosage reduction of steroids by hyposensitization therapy; the therapy was evaluated symptomatically as highly effective in 9 out of 11dogs (81.8%). In order to compare the medication scores and the steroid dosages before and after the treatment, we performed the Wilcoxon’s signed rank test. There were significant differences in both medication scores and steroid dosage (p<0.05,respectively).
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Cace Report
  • Hiroyuki INO
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 61-64
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Rabbits suffer broken bones more easily than other mammals such as cats because of their lower bone density. Generally, an intra-articular or comminuted fracture in rabbits is very difficult to repair. These facts make it difficult to determine which implant to choose, although their lower bone density does not cause slower bone healing. In this report, we applied external fixation using intramedullary pins and a kirschner wire to a femoral distal epiphysis comminuted fracture accompanying an intra-articular fracture in a rabbit. We succeeded in achieving good bone healing and complete functional recovery. A kirschner wire was especially helpful in repairing the intra-articular fracture in this case.
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  • Takeshi KUWAHARA, Kazue KUWAHARA, Koichi KUWAHARA
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 65-68
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A laryngeal mass was palpated in a 16-year-old spayed domestic cat with progressive respiratory distress. Generally, prognosis of a laryngeal tumor in cats is poor, because no tumor specific therapy has been established, and complete dissection of the larynx may lead to serious complications. In this case, permanent tracheostomy and a less invasive, partial excision along with biopsy of the mass were performed. The mass was histologically diagnosed as a laryngeal pharynx adenocarcinoma. The cat recovered, and was discharged on day 3 after surgery. According to the owner, the cat’s quality of life was ameliorated after surgery. But the cat developed dysphagia on day 54, and died a few days later. Although the cat was severely ill, its respiratory condition was good until death thanks to the tracheostomy. Consequently, in feline cases of severe respiratory distress because of a laryngeal pharynx adenocarcinoma, tracheostomy along with partial excision biopsy is one of good options for treatment, for both patients and the owners.
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  • Ryuji FUKUSHIMA, Migiwa KOMIYA
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 69-73
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An 11-year-old Shiba dog, which had been medicated for mitral regurgitation for three years, developed atrial fibrillation. The dog was hospitalized as it showed severe clinical symptoms including lethargy and anorexia. Blood chemisitry tests on day one revealed elevated glucose, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate amino transferase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, and hypokalemia. By the following day, defibrillation had been achieved by additional medication with efonidipine hydrochloride. The dog has been in good condition for 300 days since the defibrillation.
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Short Report
  • Shizuo YAMAGATA
    2013 Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 74-76
    Published: June 20, 2013
    Released: December 06, 2014
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    When a surgery to repair corneal perforation with corneal sequestration was performed in a cat, a deep corneal cleft along the ventral limbus was discovered. The cleft and perforation was sutured. The cornea around the cleft was clear, and no conjunctival hyperemia was seen, but this eyeball was excised at the owner’s request a week after surgery. The cleft had reached the middle of the lamina propria. Microscopic examination revealed the partial presence of epithelium deep in the cleft. The video images of the surgery 17 months before showed no lesion at the same site. This case is considered to have been an acquired, morphological abnormality.
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