Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 18 , Issue 3
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Sayaka OKAMURA, Reeko SATO, Saori KOBAYASHI, Yuichi YAMADA, Jun YASUDA ...
    2009 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 61-67
    Published: October 01, 2009
    Released: November 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this study, the effect of exposure to an electric field on activation of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood in FIV positive or negative cats was investigated, using an electrical stimulating device which is used for 'electrostatic potential therapy'. In human cases and in a few species of animals, exposure to an electric field generated by an alternating current has been found to improve the physiological conditions. In our experiments, we used 8 cats infected by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and 5 cats without FIV, each of which was exposed to an electric field for 30 minutes per day for 2 weeks, and we measured the activation of lymphocytes after adding Concanavalin A, a stimulator of T cells. In the FIV positive cats, electric field exposure significantly activated blastogenesis of lymphocytes. Induction of lymphocyte blastogenesis in the FIV positive cats required a longer exposure than in the FIV negative cats. In addition, lymphocytes in the peripheral blood increased in some of the FIV positive cats. These results suggest that electeic field exposure is effective in stimulating immunological responses in FIV cats.
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Case Report
  • Yusuke OHIGASHI, Kuniyoshi YASUKAWA, Hideaki MASATSUGU, Keitaro MORISH ...
    2009 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 69-74
    Published: October 01, 2009
    Released: November 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A twelve-year-old, intact female maltese was brought to us with anorexia from one day before, and CBC, biochemistry, radiography, and ultrasonography showed polycythemia and right-sided renomegaly. Surgical removal of the right kidney was not done, because bilateral renal masses were found, and only a biopsy was performed. The renal masses were diagnosed as lymphoma. The dog was treated with multidrug combination chemotherapy, which improved polycythemia and anorexia for a while. On day 78, polycythemia recurred, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed lymphadenopathy. In spite of medication with lomustin, the polycythemia gradually worsened. The dog died on day 146. Canine renal lymphoma is a very rare disease.
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  • Yuichiro MIZUTANI, Kazuaki TAKASHIMA, Tsuyoshi YAMANE, Yoshihisa YAMAN ...
    2009 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 75-78
    Published: October 01, 2009
    Released: November 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A-one-year-old cat was brought to our clinic because it was experiencing difficult delivery after the first normal baby. The second baby was dead with the posterior body stuck hanging from the vulva. Laporatomy was done under anesthesia, and the body of the fetus was pushed out of the uterus, moved toward the vulva, and extracted. The head of the dead neonate was larger than normal, and had two faces with two ears, four eyes, two noses, two oral cavities, and two tongues. This was diagnosed as diprosopus. Both oral cavities were in communication in their deep areas. Cleft palate was also found in the left oral cavity. Feline diprosopus is rare, and this report will be useful for future reference.
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Short Report
  • Takehiro UNO, Kentarou OKAMOTO, Chiharu ONAKA, Keiichi FUJITA, Hozumi ...
    2009 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 79-84
    Published: October 01, 2009
    Released: November 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Twenty-three dogs with biliary sludge but without hepatocystic diseases had gallbladder ultrasound examination twice or more at intervals of 8 months or longer, and the amount of biliary sludge, its mobility, and the time course of its volume were observed. In the group of dogs with 2/3 or more of the gallbladder filled with biliary sludge at the first examination, the mean age was higher (11 years and one month) than in the other two groups with less biliary sludge. As to the change of volume of biliary sludge, the mean age of dogs with increased deposit was highest; many dogs aged more than 12 years showed an increase. Out of 15 dogs with mobile biliary sludge, the sludge disappeared or was reduced in seven dogs. Out of seven dogs with immobile sludge, five dogs showed an increase of sludge, and two showed no change. In our observations, however, there was no statistical difference between age and changes in the amount or mobility of biliary sludge. In hematological tests, we found no correlation between total serum thyroxin (T4) concentration and the amount of biliary sludge, although two of four dogs with a low level of T4 had immobile biliary sludge. In conclusion, our survey suggested that in dogs with immobile sludge or with 2/3 or more of the gallbladder filled with sludge tends to increase, and that it also tends to increase in aged dogs.
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