Journal of Animal Clinical Medicine
Online ISSN : 1881-1574
Print ISSN : 1344-6991
ISSN-L : 1344-6991
Volume 10 , Issue 2
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Tetsuya SHIMODA, Tadahisa MASHITA, Takuya MATSUKAWA, Jyun NAKANISHI, T ...
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 81-85
    Published: 2001
    Released: April 17, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to clarify the characteristics of anemia in feline leukemia virus positive cats, a total of 267 cats were classified pathologically and pathophysiologically. 224 of the cats with enough data were divided into two groups, i.e a hyperplastic anemia group and a hypoplastic anemia group. The two categories were defined tentatively in this study according to the percentage of reticulocytes. Twenty-seven cats fell into the hyperplastic anemia group, and the other 197 cats into the hypoplastic anemia group, including 26 cases of secondary anemia. There was a tendency for cats with more severe symptomes to be categorized as having macrocytic anemia.
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  • Masato FUJIMURA
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 87-94
    Published: 2001
    Released: April 17, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Elimination and challenge tests were performed on skin-test-positive dogs with pruritus. Twenty-seven dogs had slight to moderate pruritus as their main complaint and also had food allergy. They were fed elimination diets for at least three weeks. After the allergic symptoms had lessened, each dog was given a series of three-day challenge diets consisting of a single antigen food. In almost all the cases, elimination diets improved the skin condition, and the results of the skin tests showed good correlation with the elimination and challenge tests. Fourteen of the dogs were allergic to beef, 14 to bread, 12 to eggs, 11 to potatoes, 11 to chicken, 11 to pork, 9 to rice, 8 to tomtoes, 7 to , milk, and 6 to cabbage.
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Case Report
  • Shuji FURUKAWA, Shizu HASHIMOTO, Sanae SAEGUSA, Hozumi YAMAMURA, Nobor ...
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 95-99
    Published: 2001
    Released: April 17, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We report two cats living in the same house which had respiratory probems (dyspnea, cough) and enlarged lymph nodes. Case one was a three-year-old male cat with dyspnea. A tumor attached to the chest wall was removed, and it consisted of an enlarged lymph node wiht granulomatous lymphadenitis. The cat died 11 months after surgery in spite of careful symptomatic medical treatment. Postmortem histopathological examination revealed Zieh1-Neelsen stain positive bacteria at the granulomatous foci, which indicated infection by a specific kind of mycobactera. The other case was a four-year-old female cat which had continual cough for six months. This cat was brought in ten months after the first visit of Case One. Palpation and radiography suggested the presence of tumors in the abdomen and chest, so exploratory laparatomy was done. An extremely enlarged lymph node was found on the mesenterium, but could not be removed completely. Thoracotomy was not performed. Histopathologically, the excised tumor was diagnosed as showing purulent granulomatous lymphadenitis. Medical treatment was initiated with rifampicin, isoniazid, and enrofloxacin for probable mycobacterial infection. Two months of medication effectively normalized the volume of the lymph nodes, and cured the cough. This cat has been in good health since then. Although mycobacteria were not actually detected by microbiological examination,the clinical and histopathological findings and the effectiveness of medication suggested that the disease was systemic mycobacterial disease.
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  • Naofumi OGUSHI, Masato KITAGAWA, Hiroshi KOIE, Tsuneo SATO, Kyuji SHIM ...
    2001 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 101-105
    Published: 2001
    Released: April 17, 2007
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This is a case report of a six-year-old male scotch terrier which developed multiple cutaneous lumps around the neck followed by hindlimb paralysis. A skin biopsy of one of the lumps revealed cutaneous lymphoma which tended to develop centripetally, and not toward epidermis. MRI of the spine was performed and a paraspinal tumor was found, but there was no evidence that the spinal cord was compressed by the tumor. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed atypical lymphoid cells, which indicated that the paralysis of the hindquarters was caused by infiltration of tumor cells into the spinal cord. The patient died of respiratory insufficiency two weeks later. MRI is invaluable for the diagnosis and prognosis of spinal cord neoplasms in animal clinics.
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Teaching Report
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