Food Hygiene and Safety Science (Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi)
Online ISSN : 1882-1006
Print ISSN : 0015-6426
ISSN-L : 0015-6426
Volume 38 , Issue 2
Showing 1-22 articles out of 22 articles from the selected issue
  • Isao TOMITA
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 39-47
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Masahiko OGAWA, Tohru SAKAI, Kazuyuki OHKUMA, Tadashi MATSUMOTO, Yoshi ...
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 48-61_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A method for rapid determination of 95 kinds of pesticide residues in agricultural products by solvent extraction, GPC clean-up and GC/MS-SIM was developed.
    1) A mixed solvent of acetone-ethyl acetate-n-hexane (2:9:9) was selected for extraction, with anhydrous sodium sulfate as a drying agent.
    2) GPC elution profiles of pesticides and major components in agricultural products were studied with various organic solvents, i. e., toluene, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran and cyclohexane. Toluene was selected as the most suitable mobile phase for GPC with well-swollen Bio Beads S-X3.
    3) Detection limits of 95 pesticides by GC/MS-SIM were sufficient for practical use. Eighty-six pesticides spiked into 5 kinds of agricultural products gave good recoveries by the proposed method, which is considered to be satisfactory for the rapid determination of multiple pesticide residues in agricultural products.
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  • Toshio HIDAKA, Tadashi KIRIGAYA, Taro KAWAMURA, Saju KAWAUCHI
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 62-68_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Gel filtration of soybean sprouts treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) affords a fraction showing a high level of chloroform (CHCl3), and this was studied to identify the precursors of CHCl3.
    Eight spots were observed on the plate in thin layer chromatography of the fraction, and their Rf values suggested that they might be amino acids. The mass spectral ion peaks of the fraction obtained by LC/MS suggested the presence of ten kinds of amino acids. The presence of these amino acids was confirmed by HPLC of the fraction, and among them, L-asparagine showed the highest value of 131.1μg/mL. When the ten kinds of amino acids thus detected were treated with NaClO, CHCl3 was formed from seven of them. An amino acid standard solution prepared with amounts similar to those in the fraction was treated with NaClO for 24 hours. The consequent CHCl3 formation was 94.2% of that formed from the fraction. Thus, the amino acid constituents identified in the gel filtration fraction are considered to be the precursors of CHCl3 formed in soybean sprouts by NaClO treatment.
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  • Yasuo TANAKA, Shiro HOSOI, Ryoko SHIMIZU, Tadashi KIRIGAYA, Tadayoshi ...
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 69-77_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    Endosulfan (ES), a widely used organochlorine pesticide, is oxidized to ES-sulfate in the environment. In addition, ES is metabolized to ES-sulfate, ES-alcohol, ES-ether, ES-lactone and other products in plants.
    A simple and rapid method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ES and its metabolites, including α-ES, β-ES, ES-sulfate, ES-alcohol, ES-ether and ES-lactone, with GC. In this method ES and its metabolites are eluted in three fractions from a silica gel column. The metabolites are identified by GC/MS.
    The developed method was applied to crops in which α-ES, β-ES and ES-sulfate had been detected by use of an established method. These compounds were also detected by the new method, together with ES-ether, ES-lactone and ES-alcohol in some samples.
    The recoveries of ES and its metabolites fortified at the levels of 0.1μg/g and 1μg/g were more than 90%. The detection limits of α-ES, β-ES, ES-ether and ES-lactone were 0.25ng/g, and those of ES-sulfate and ES-alcohol were 0.5ng/g, respectively.
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  • Mitsue OHTA, Mikako NARITA, Tomoko MIYOSHI, Tomoko ITOYAMA, Mika KIMUR ...
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 78-84_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    Simple and rapid extraction and determination methods were developed for the analysis of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) in chewing gum by GC and GC/MS. The antioxidants were extracted with acetonitrile from samples, and the extract was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate. This solution was injected into GC and GC/MS instruments.
    Recoveries of BHA, BHT and TBHQ ranged from 81.4 to 98.9%, from 80.7 to 106% and from 70.8 to 116%, respectively, and the detection limits of these antioxidants were 1ppm in GC analysis and 0.1ppm in GC/MS analysis.
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  • Masumi OHFUJI, Takeji CHIKAMOTO, Isao KAMADA, Masamoto KOMATSU
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 85-91_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A gas chromatographic method was developed for the determination of dinoseb, dinoterb and 4, 6-dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC) in citrus fruits by methylation using trimethylsilyldiazomethane (TMSD).
    These dinitrophenol pesticides were extracted by homogenizing the sample with acetone. After evaporation of the acetone, the pesticides were extracted with dichloromethane. After evaporation, the residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate and the pesticides were methylated with TMSD in the presence of methanol at room temperature for 30min and then cleaned up with a Sep-Pak® Florisil cartridge using diethyl ether-hexane (1:1). The eluate was concentrated and analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector using a SUPELCO SPB-5 capillary column.
    The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.01-0.2μg/mL. The detection limits of the respective pesticides in citrus fruits were 0.005μg/g. The recoveries of the pesticides added to citrus fruits at 0.05ppm ranged from 73 to 85%.
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  • Yuji SHIRAI, Shigetaka SUZUKI, Wakana SEKIGUCHI
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 92-96_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    An analytical method for chlorfluazuron (CFA) in feed by HPLC was established. Water was added to a sample, and CFA was extracted with acetonitrile. The extract was cleaned up on a porous diatomite cartridge, followed by a Florisil column and a silica cartridge. The CFA was determined by HPLC on an ODS column of Mightysil RP18 (4.6mm i. d.×250mm) with a UV detector (260nm). The recovery test was conducted with 3 kinds of feed spiked with CFA at levels of 0.02-2.0ppm. The mean recovery values were in the range of 78.7-95.7%, and the relative standard deviations of repeatability (RSDr) were within 14.1%. A collaborative study (7 laboratories) was conducted with mixed feed spiked with CFA at the level of 1.0ppm. The mean recovery was 87.7%, and the relative standard deviation of reproducibility (RSDR) was 3.7%. The detection limit was 0.02ppm in a sample.
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  • Yoko UEMATSU, Yuki SADAMASU, Keiko HIRATA, Masako HIROKADO, Kazuo YASU ...
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 97-104_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Residual levels of 12 solvents in 96 flavor preparations were analyzed by head-space gas chromatography and compared with those in 86 natural flavors. Methanol in 22, acetone in 8 and isopropanol in 8 samples exceeded the limits for spice oleolesin set by the FDA.
    Acetone and hexane levels in flavor preparations were lower than those in natural flavors. These 2 solvents were suggested to be residues of the extracting solvents.
    Methanol, isopropanol and ethyl acetate levels in flavor preparations were higher than those in natural flavors. These 3 solvents might represent artificial flavoring substances, condensed volatiles of raw materials or impurities of ethanol used as a diluent, as well as residues of the extracting solvents.
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  • Chiaki MURAKAMI, Takenori MARUYAMA, Isao NIIYA
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 105-109_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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    A sensitive method for the determination of propylene glycol esters of fatty acids (PGEs) in foods by HPLC was developed. The PGEs were extracted from foods and purified by silica gel column chromatography. The isolated PGEs were derivatized with 3, 5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride and the reaction products were dissolved in a mixture of tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile (1:1) for HPLC. A portion of this solution was injected onto an Inertsil 5C8 column, and eluted with a mixture of acetonitrile and water (90:10) as the mobile phase. Detection was done with a UV detector set at 230nm. PGEs in various foods could be selectively detected without interference. Peaks of PGE having fatty acids of C16:0 and C18:0 could be well separated. The recoveries of PGEs added to margarine, shortening and cake powder at the level of 0.5% or 1.0% were more than 93%. The detection limits were 10μg/g for total PGE. The proposed method for determination of the content and fatty acids composition of PGE in foods is suitable for routine work.
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  • Yoshio YAMAURA, Kazuo NAKAMURA, Yuji ISHIHARA
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 110-115_1
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 179-180
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 180
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 181-182
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 182-183
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 183
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 184-185
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 185-186
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 186-187
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 187-188
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 188-189
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 189-190
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1997 Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 191
    Published: April 05, 1997
    Released: December 11, 2009
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