CYTOLOGIA
Online ISSN : 1348-7019
Print ISSN : 0011-4545
Volume 40 , Issue 2
Showing 1-31 articles out of 31 articles from the selected issue
  • O. P. Mittal, B. Kaul
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 221-225
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    In the small Indian mongoose, H. auropunctatus (Hodgson) no racial difference has been found. The diploid number is confirmed to be 35 and 36 in the male and female, respectively. It is concluded that a part of original Y-chromosome is translocated onto an autosome. The X-chromosome forms a trivalent with that particular autosomal bivalent bearing Y. However, certain cells at diakinesis and metaphase I also reveal 17 bivalents and a univalent X, which is due to the precocious disjunction of X from that autosomal bivalent.
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  • M. S. Pavgi
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 227-235
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Germination of teliospores of Puccinia soghi Schw., overwintered outdoors was studied and illustrated in sequence. Physiological maturity and appropriate adjustment of environmental factors such as the amount of condensed moisture and adequate supply of oxygen were important for normal germination. Excessive moisture deposit resulting in reduction in oxygen tension induced atypical germination, inhibition or delaying development of the basidiospores and nuclear divisions. Decline in the number of basidiospores, abnormal branching and thickening of promycelia and sterigmata, failure in septation and delayed nuclear organization or association of daughter nuclei were important features observed. Possible consequences of these aberrations leading to sterility and pathogenic variability are indicated.
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  • Masahide Kurita, Yûzô Kuroki
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 237-242
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    A study was made on H-segments of autosomes in female clones of Rumex acetosa. Chromocenters at interphase as well as H-segments at early prophase are variable in number, in contrast with the H-segments at mid-prophase where their number is constant to a clone. It was considered that the chromocenter undergoes the DNA replication with a heterochromatic coiled state in some cases and without the coiled state in the other cases. At early- and mid-prophase, each of the H-segments is darkly stained or is lightly stained as an euchromatic segment is. The dark H-segment must have been originated from the chromocenter kept through an interphase, and the light H-segment from a chromocenter-forming segment which lost the coiled state under the DNA replication. The H-segment taking no chromocenter figure under the replication seems to be more rapidly coiled than an euchromatic segment through early- and mid-prophase.
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  • C. L. Kaul
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 243-248
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Pollen sterility in a plant of Allium cepa was found to be associated with a high incidence of univalents. Initial pairing of the chromosomes took place at early prophase but in 70% of the cells the chromosomes separated completely prior to metaphase I. This dissociation of paired chromosomes occurred either on account of failure of chiasmata or of their precocious terminalization. Desynapsis was of the ‘medium-strong’ type. Anaphase I was typified by unequal chromosome distribution, lagging and a high frequency of precociously dividing univalents. The first nuclear division resulted in the fromation of 1-8 micronuclei. A second nuclear division occurred rarely.
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  • Beverly J. White, Joe-Hin Tjio
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 249-252
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    The AL/N mouse strain was found to have 38 chromosomes including two translocation submetacentrics identical to TlWh. Giemsa-banding showed that the TlWh AL/N translocation submetacentrics both involve chromosomes 5 and 19; meiotic studies of male (TlWh_??_×AL/N_??_) F1 hybrids confirmed these results. The origin and significance of TlWh and several other Robertsonian mouse translocations are discussed.
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  • D. V. S. Tyagi, K. Das
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 253-262
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Eighty four barley mutants induced through the treatment of EMS and EMS+DES were cytologically tested. Detailed cytological account of the five mutants which showed abnormal meiosis has been presented. Abnormal features were like univalents, precocious separation, unequal distribution of chromosomes, fragments, bridges, laggards and irregular tetrad formation. Pollen was sterile to variable degree. Discussion deals with the possible causes of univalent formation at meiotic prophase and variability of univalent behaviour at metaphase I and anaphase I stages. Abnormal features have been ascribed to desynapsis. Morphology of the mutants has been described and their uses highlighted.
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  • III. Mentha arvensis Linn. × M. spicata Linn
    S. N. Sobti
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 263-267
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    F1 hybrid between M. arvensis Linn. subsp. haplocalyx Briq. var. piperascens Holmes and M. spicata Linn. was produced. The hybrid is intermediate in morphological characters between the two parents and is completely sterile. The detailed cytology of the hybrid and the parents is described. The genome present in M. spicata is not homologous with any of the genomes present in M. arvensis subsp. haplocalyx var. piperascens.
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  • S. S. N. Sinha, S. S. Acharia
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 269-276
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    From the meiotic analysis of fifteen varieties of Lens culinaris it was noted that there was a regular formation of seven bivalents in all these vaireties but they differed in the number of ring and rod bivalents per pollen mother cell and the value of 1/2 chiasmata per bivalent. From the analysis of intraclass variance it was noted that there existed a significant variation in their chiasmata frequency. A negative correlation was noted in all these varieties except K 1995, where there was a positive correlation. Such observation indicated that there was a variation in the distribution of chiasmata even in the same nucleus. The analysis of pollen grains revealed that pollen sterility was present in such variety, but it had not attained appreciable value.
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  • S. Naskar, D. K. Nanda
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 277-284
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Ring gland in adult Chrysomyia megacephala is composed of a dorsomedian globular compact gland, the corpus allatum over the aorta and an amalgamated component of corpus cardiacum and hypocerebral ganglion (gland-ganglion complex) below. The latter is innervated by oesophageal and recurrent nerves. The lateral portions of the ring do not expose cellular consistency. The corpus allatum is semisyncytial and contains discernible CAH- and AF-positive material. The difference in size and contour of the gland depends upon the maturity and age of the fly. The corpus cardiacum contains intrinsic cells and extrinsic fibres exhibiting secretion and storage respectively. Massive granule rich hypocerebral ganglion cells invade the corpus cardiacan elements. The immediate relation of these cells with the parenchymal elements of the corpus cardiacum is hitherto not established.
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  • Bibha Bhattacharya
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 285-299
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Thirtyfive taxa under five genera of the family Commelinaceae have been studied cytologically. Different populations of the same species collected from different regions of Eastern India have also been studied. The chromosome numbers determined range from 2n=20 to 120.
    The chromosome complements of different populations of the same species have been found to differ from each other not only in the number but also in the structure of the chromosomes to a greater or lesser extent. In the origin of different members of the family studied here, structural alterations have been as important as the changes in the number of chromosomes, in the evolution of new forms. In speciation in this family as seen from chromosome number records allo and aneuploidy have played much more important roles than autopolyploidy.
    Variations in the chromosome complements in somatic nuclei of the same individual have been found in some cases. Since all the species are propagated profusely through vegetative means, the occurrence of varying numbers in the somatic tissue obviously provides scope for the origin of new types; through their entrance into the growing apex of daughter shoots.
    In view if the data obtained so far, it has been suggested that there are two major chromosomal lines within the family Commelinaceae, one starting from a basic set of 4 or 5 comparatively short chromosomes, the other from a basic set of 6 long chromosomes. The other numbers are apparently derived ones.
    Reviewing the different systems of classification, the one followed by Pichon (1946) or Brenan (1966) has been found to be more compatible with the cytological data since they group the taxa together as climaxes of different sub-lines of evolution. Cytological evidences are more in favour of them rather than of the systems recognising only two major groups within this family.
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  • A. Seetharam, K. M. D. Nayar, R. S. Aradhya, H. S. Hanumanthappa
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 301-305
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Seeds of finger millet var. Co. 1 were treated with ethyl methane sulphonate. In the M1 generation of such treated material, asynaptic mutants were observed. Cytological studies revealed that asynapsis was medium-strong with a high frequency of univalents at diakinesis and metaphase-I, along with a few bivalent-like associations. Even in these bivalents, the association was very weak with end-to-end attachment of homologous chromosomes in a rod like fashion without the formation of any visible chiasmata. The asynaptic mutants were highly sterile, but a few progeny showed varying number of chromosomes suggesting the feasibility of developing aneuploid lines in finger millet.
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  • Seiichiro Fujimoto, Nahid Pahlavan, Harold D. Woody, W. R. Dukelow
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 307-311
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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  • Maggie M. Chiu, Richard H. Falk
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 313-322
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    The structure of young frond cells of Lemna perpusilla is similar to meristematic cells. The abscission zone which forms in Lemna is found to consist of 4-5 rows of rectangular cells. Early in development, cells in this zone often have long segments of endoplasmic reticulum associated with plasmodesmata. Later, microtubules associated with the walls of cells in this zone assume a random orientation. Myelin figures appear and as abscission progesses, cell separation occurs. The development of crystal and the association of ribosome-like particles are also observed.
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  • D. G. Krishnappa, M. S. Chennaveeraiah
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 323-331
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Solanum indicum L. reveals variations both in phenotypic and karyotypic characters forming a complex. The variants are found in distinctly different localities which also enjoy different ecological conditions in South India. Among them, Type I from Castle Rock, Type III from Niligiri Hills and Type IV from low land plains and scrub forests are distinct with respect to their morphological and cytological characters. Type II and some populations belonging to Type I are also distinct, but they possess intermediate characters; they reveal cytological variations within their respective populations. All the four Types have 2n=24 chromosomes excepting for the presence of extra chromosomes in some populations.
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  • VI. Chromosome relationships between Papaver species of the Section Orthorhoeades (P. syriacum f. adpresso setulosus and P. rhoeas and their amphiploids)
    C. P. Malik, T. N. Mary
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 333-345
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Cytogenetic relationships between two diploid species belonging to genus Papaver section Orthorhoeades (Papaver syriacum f. adpresso-setulosum Boiss; P. rhoeas Lin.) is assessed using several parameters e.g. morphology, cytology, extent of crossing and cytogenetic display of hybrids and amphiploids. Even F2 populations have also been analysed cytogenetically.
    Both the species had normal meiotic course and 7 bivalents were formed at metaphase I; there was preponderance of rod bivalents in the P. syriacum. The hybrids between the two species had reduced chromosome pairing and less chiasma frequency compared to the parents. Univalents and heteromorphic rod bivalents were deciphered at metaphase I of the FI's. Our studies also indicated structural differences between chromosomes of two species. The presence of multivalents in the diploid hybrids suggested heterogenity for segmental arrangements within the two species and pachynema studies supported such inferences. The genetic differentiation of two species paralleled phenotypic differentiation. The F2 populations also exhibited meiotic disturbances and reduced fertility but increase in the variability of the chiasmata frequency. There were some plants with translocations also. The variability in size and number of fragments at anaphase I and anaphase II suggested their origin through chromosome breakage and reunion rather than inversion heterozygosity. The amphiploid had mean pairing as 1.54IV+.78III+8.25II+3.0I. Multivalents were low in frequency and rod bivalents were in higher percentage. Persistance of bridge-fragment configurations at anaphase I, II of the tetraploid amphiploid derivative (i.e. amphiploid) supported their origin through breakage-reunion process. Detailed taxonomic relationships of two species within themselves and with other species in the section Orthorhoeades is further discussed.
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  • B. D. Singh, B. L. Harvey
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 347-354
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Cytogenetic behaviour of Haplopappus gracilis (Nutt.) Gray cells cultured on agar or in liquid B5 medium containing 4.5×10-6 M 2, 4-D, was studied. The nuclei in explants (hypocotyl cells from three-day old seedlings) had 2C, 4C and 8C DNA values and showed a continuous distribution. The explants fixed 72 hrs after they were placed on the culture medium, showed only diploid and tetraploid mitoses. On the agar medium, the frequency of polyploid cells increased with time, while in the suspension cultures, a drastic increase in the frequency of diploids was observed. Longer transfer intervals in the suspension cultures resulted in an increase in the frequency of tetraploid cells. It is suggested that endoreduplication is the major factor involved in the increase of the polyploid frequency.
    The frequency of chromosome I was greater than expected in the majority of the aneuploid cells, and in the suspension cultures many diploid cells had a deleted chromosome II. It is suggested that the genes present in chromosome II are comparatively less essential than those present in chromosome I for the in vitro survival of H. gracilis cells in the culture systems used.
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  • S. S. Raghuvanshi, C. S. Pathak
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 355-363
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Polyploids of Phlox drummondii, Hook. raised in white, yellow, dark pink, red and violet varieties exhibited improved flower size, blooming pattern and also displayed improvement in shade of colour over their diploid progenitors. While C1 tetraploids had lower chiasma frequency than diploids, in C2 there was increase in chiasma frequency which was higher than diploids. Result of efforts to raise triploids as a result of hybridizations between 2n and 4n have been discussed. Differential response towards seed setting had been exhibited by different varieties at tetraploid level. Possibility of raising double varieties has been discussed.
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  • Abraham Mathew, P. M. Mathew
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 365-370
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Cytology of seven species of Blumea indigenous to S. India, viz. B. wightiana (n=9 and 2n=18), B. barbata (n=8 and 2n=16), B. lacera (n=18 and 2n=36), B. virens (n=9 and 2n=18), B. jacquemontii (n=9 and 2n=18), B. oxyodonta (n=9) and B. membrancea (n=18) has been studied, of which three are fresh reports and the others are new counts.
    Four haploid basic chromosome numbers are known in Blumea (x=8, 9, 10 and 11), of which x=8 is reported for the first time in the genus. The S. Indian taxa fall into two basic series, x=8 and 9. Cytological evidence indicates that x=10 in Blumea could be the earlier evolved condition, from which the lower constitutions found among the S. Indian taxa have evolved by progressive reduction through formation of B's followed by their elimination.
    Four species of Blumea reported here showed frequent occurrence of accessory chromosomes in the PMC's at meiosis, and they showed a tendency for meiotic elimination. This is the first report of B's in the genus.
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  • J. Syamasundar, M. G. Panchaksharappa
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 371-376
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    The cytochemical composition of the hypertrophied synergid cell in Allium cepa is studied in relation with egg, zygote and the young embryo by using localization methods for insoluble polysaccharides, nucleic acids and proteins.
    The two synergids are larger than the egg cell to begin with and their cytochemical composition is similar to that of the egg cell in having low cytoplasmic polysaccharides, RNA and proteins; their large nuclei show less stainability for DNA. With the organization of the egg apparatus completed, one of the synergids becomes more hypertrophied than the other and both of them possess PAS positive cytoplasm which is rich in RNA and proteins. The nuclei in the synergids are proportionately large and stain with azur A as densely as the nuclei of the somatic cells. The smaller synergid degenerates after fertilization. The hypertrophied synergid, by the side of the zygote, has an immensely large nucleus with chromatin reticulum made of giant chromatin threads-perhaps polytenic in nature. The hypertrophied synergid remains active until the embryo reaches 3-celled stage and degenerates later. The enlarged synergid cell of A. cepa does the functions of absorption, storage and subsequent secretion of nutritional substances required by the egg, zygote and the young embryo.
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  • T. Terasmaa
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 377-382
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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  • D. K. Gulati, P. S. Sabharwal, P. R. Bhalla
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 383-388
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Young roots from onion bulbs were treated with different concentrations of water-soluble extracts of tobacco smoke condensate from 4 experimental cigarettes (IA1, IA2, IA3, and IA4). The cigarettes have varied in amounts of tar, nicotine and total phenols produced (Table 2). From the treated roots, meristematic cells were examined for various cytological parameters. TSC from all cigarettes induced mitotic irregularities. These abnormalities consisted of breakage of chromosomes during metaphase or anaphase, stickiness at metaphase and bridging at anaphase. The mitotic irregularities increased with increasing concentrations of TSC. There were no significant differences in potency of TSC from four experimental cigarettes in inducing mitotic abnormalities. In addition to the mitotic irregularities, TSC from different cigarettes inhibited cell wall formation which resulted in binucleate cells. Thus, the present studies clearly show that TSC from various cigarettes, yielding different amounts of tar and nicotine, have no differential cytological effects on onion root-tip cells.
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  • H. C. Choudhuri
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 389-400
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    The haploid number of chromosomes in S. melongena var. Bassawa is found to be 12. Frequencies of chiasmata at diplotene and diakinesis are analysed. The chiasma frequency per bivalent at diplotene and diakinesis varied from 2.2 to 1.3 respectively.
    The association of chromosomes in three and four occurred in 21.29% cases observed. The occurrence of high frequency of multivalents in a diploid seemed to indicate the presence of translocation interchanges in S. melongena var. Bassawa.
    The frequency of univalents varied from 4.63 to 5.10%. Sturctural changes and gene mutation are probably responsible for failure of pairing among pairable chromosomes. The behaviour of univalents varied, they either pass to poles or lag and divide. The division and elimination of univalents cause unequal distribution of chromosomes on second metaphase plates. Univalents and fragments which failed to be included in the daughter nuclei formed micronuclei (7.4%).
    Chromatid bridge formation varied from 5.0 to 5.25% in the first and second anaphases respectively. The chromosome irregularities and abortion of pollen grains (38.3%) are presumably due to gene mutation.
    The spontaneous chromosome aberrations and partial sterility indicate that the diploid S. melongena var. Bassawa is presumably of hybrid origin.
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  • A. Sheriff, M. S. Chennaveeraiah
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 401-408
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Three populations under Chlorophytum attenuatum collected from three different geographical regions in India have been subjected to cytological and cytotaxonomic studies. Cytological studies have revealed that the species exists at different levels of polyploidy under the 7-basic chromosome number series in the genus, exhibiting a very interesting regional distribution pattern. The population from the Londa area consists of hexaploids (2n=42). The Mahabaleshwar population is a mixture of hexaploids (2n=42) and 12-ploids (2n=84) which are morphologically indistinguishable. The Nandi Hill population is unique both phenotypically and cytologically in consisting of only 12-ploids (2n=84). The chromosome number of 2n=84 as a stabilised condition is the highest recorded so far in the genus. While the karyotypic features of all the three populations conform to the general karyotype pattern in the genus, the karyotype of each population is distinct from the other. Meiotic behaviour is indicative of the allopolyploid nature of the three populations. The superimposition of phenotypic variation over cytological variation in each population makes them so distinct that it provides a basis for the breaking up of the species attenuatum on cytotaxonomic and biosystematic considerations, removal of Nandi Hill and Londa populations from attenuatum and their elevation to the rank of new species under Chlorophytum.
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  • U. Subhashini
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 409-413
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    The species N. umbratica reported from Australia (Burbidge 1960) is unique in the genus Nicotiana having a chromosome number of 2n=46. Intersubgeneric and intrasubgeneric crosses were made with a view to find out phylogenetic relationship. The present results substantiate Burbidge's findings, wherein she has accomodated the species N. umbratica in the section suaveolentes of subgenus petunioides. The crossability and cytological studies revealed, that N. umbratica is closely related to N. megalosiphon (2n=40). The study also supports Good-speed's (1954) prediction that the further expansion of the genus above the 24 paired level is possible by amphiploidy. The fertile amphiploid N. megalosiphon-umbratica (2n=86) is a positive proof.
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  • Angulo Ma. D., Sánchez de Rivera, A. Ma.
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 415-423
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Four ecotypes of Trifolium subterraneum L. are studied karyologically determining their chromosomes number 2n=16, and the respective karyotypes established by means of a comparative chromosome study.
    The karyological information obtained enables to set forth some considerations about the structural characteristics of the karyotype, agricultural conditions of the various ecotypes, as yet unsolved systematic problems and some problems related to the evolutionary tendencies in Trifolium.
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  • C. N. Sun
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 425-432
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    In the WI cells after 44 hours inoculation with adenovirus type 5 (Ad-5), there were many intranuclear viral particles and dense patches. Frequently, large nonviral paracrystalline bodies from 2 to 3μ in diameter were in the nuclei. In the cytoplasm of the inoculated cells, many of the mitochondria were disorganized by vacuolization. Sometimes a dense granular material was present in the mitochondria. Bleblike swelling of rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and partial fusion of cisternal membranes formed a network of ER cisternae.
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  • James T. Willerson, Jacquline R. Wakeland, Marvin J. Stone, Kern Wilde ...
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 433-440
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    A method for maintaining mouse spleen in organ culture has been described. Under appropriate conditions, the spleens survive for at least 8 days in vitro. The histological appearance of most of the cells remains normal, and glucose uptake and release of immunoglobulins persist during cultivation. Satisfactory results are dependent on utilization of relatively thick sections of splenic tissue: thin specimens (<0.5 mm slices from adult spleen and whole spleens from fetal mice) fail to survive well, whereas slices of >1.5 mm thickness or whole spleens from adult mice survive histologically and functionally for a period of at least 8 days.
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  • III. The Agrostideae, Aveneae, Brachypodieae, Bromeae, Festuceae, Phalarideae and Triticeae
    P. N. Mehra, M. L. Sharma
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 441-452
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Cytological investigations in 44 taxa belonging to 35 species and 18 genera of the tribes Agrostideae, Aveneae, Brachypodieae, Bromeae, Festuceae, Phalarideae and Triticeae were carried out from the hills of Darjeeling and Nainital. Ten species and a variety has been worked out for the first time and new cytological races were discovered for another two species.
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  • IV. The Arundinelleae, Eragrosteae, Isachneae, Chlorideae, Sporoboleae, Meliceae, Stipeae, Arundineae and Garnotieae
    P. N. Mehra, M. L. Sharma
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 453-462
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Cytological data on 26 taxa of the tribes Arundinelleae, Eragrosteae, Isachneaey Chlorideae, Sporoboleae, Meliceae, Stipeae, Arundineae and Garnotieae is presented from the hills of Darjeeling (E. Himalayas) and Nainital (C. Himalayas). Ten species marked * in Table 1 are cytologically reported for the first time. New chromosome numbers are reported for another 4 species marked † in the same table.
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  • V. The Bambuseae
    P. N. Mehra, M. L. Sharma
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 463-467
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
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    Cytological investigations in 6 species belonging to 3 genera of the tribe Bambuseae (Gramineae) have been carried out from the hills of Darjeeling. Of these, 5 species, Arundinaria aristata (n=24), A. japonica (n=24), A. pantlingii (n=24), A. racemosa (n=24) and Dendrocalamus hamiltonii (n=35) have been worked out for the first time.
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  • S. Fujimoto, T. J. Passantino, I. Koenczoel, S. J. Segal
    1975 Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 469-475
    Published: June 25, 1975
    Released: March 19, 2009
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
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