Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 10 , Issue 1
Showing 1-13 articles out of 13 articles from the selected issue
  • D. Nisimura
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 1-18
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    D. Brunt and other authors pointed out that the results of meteorological observations made at O'Gyalla, Horns Rev, Lindenberg and other places, do not satisfy Taylor's well known equation, U=V(cosθ-sinθ). (1)
    In our previous papers we got a following equation (2), by making an assumption that the angle between the gradient wind and the resistance is nearly constant;- U=V{cosθ-tan(c-θ)sinθ} (2) where U is the velocity of the surface wind, V that of the gradient wind, θ the angle between the velocity of wind and the straight isobars, c a certain constant of which the mean value is found to be 65° or 70° as a result of actual observations.
    In the present paper, we have shown that practically the equation is applicable, with relatively small deviation, for every value of θ, by comparing the values computed by this equation with observed ones at Croydon, Lympne, Calshot, Holyhead, Lindenberg, Naha and Tateno.
    The author has proceeded further to investigate the relation between the vertical distribution of the wind and the lapse-rate of temperature with the observed values at Lindenberg.
    It was shown that the ratio of the velocity of the surface wind to that of the gradient wind is nearly constant namely about 0.4 in the case of inversion, increasing with the lapse-rate.
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  • Masanao ABE
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 19-25
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    Introduction:- A peculiar cloud already known as a kind of lenticular cloud is formed by the obstruction of Mt. Fuji. The cloud I relate here also belongs to this kind and this cloud is called “Tsurushi”.
    The investigation regarding this cloud was made by the aid of cinematographs as well as two cabinet cameras which were set at two points 500 meters apart from each other; the simultaneous exposure of cameras being made at these two points. Thus I obtained stereoscopic photoplates and cinema filmes; by the aide of the former, I calculated the geographical position of the cloud relative to Mt. Fuji, and by the latter, the motion of cloud was studied stereoscopically.
    Place of observation:- Gotenba, Shizuoka-Ken.
    Date of observation:- 10 A. M. 27th, January 1930.
    Cloud Height and Location:- The cloud, “Tsurushi” was located eastwards of the summit of Mt. Fuji and 4.3km. high above sea level.
    Cloud Figure and its Motion:- The cloud mass is composed of many lenticular clouds of convex shape lying side by side horizontaly and the cloud particles, which compose this cloud, are waving and moving along the surface of the cloud, descriving an arc-like path. This can be observed by stereoscope and by cinematograph.
    Wind Direction and Velocity at the time when Photograph was taken:- At my observing station, the wind was north and its velocity was 2 or 3 meters per second; as for the wind on the summit of Mt. Fuji, I was informed that the east-northeast wind suddenly changed to the west from 9 o'clock and its velocity increased to 10m. per second; and a cloud “Tsurushi” was seen in the sky eastward for the same duration of time of my observation in the same morning.
    Supposition Pertaining to the Formation of the Cloud Figure:- We may suppose that this cloud figure is simply formed by the heaving of air or the vortex as a consequence of the obstruction of a mountain, but we can otherwise suppose it to be due to the collision of upper and lower air currents, whose directions are different from each other, due to the interference of mountain; or it may seem more reasonable to think so about the formation of such cloud figure.
    The Experiment in a Wind Channel regarding the Collision of Air Current:- In order to know the condition of air current caused by the collision of upper and lower winds, the experiment was so conducted that the model of Mt. Fuji (size 1/50, 000) was placed in the experimental wind chamber as if the upper wind is west above 3km. in corresponding real height. Regarding the wind below, three experiments were made for east, northeast, and north; and this lower air current was made to blow in to the experimental chamber from a rectangular shaped nozzle which was inserted by the side of the chamber. To see the figure of the collision of air current, the smoke produced from one kind of incense-stick, was mixed with the side air current. Thus the figure of collision of upper and lower currents, by the obstruction of the mountain, could be experimentally formed. The deduction, made from the experiment in a wind channel, may not be sufficient to explain the figure of the cloud completely, but I dare say that the aspect of the air current, in an experimental chamber, shows the probable tendency of the air condition which will really occur in the nature.
    Arrow Showing the Direction of Air Flow in Three Dimentions:- In order to show the motion of air current on a plane, it becomes necessary to express the direction of air current by three dimentions. Owing to such necessity, I tried to use the sign of special arrow. This conventional figure is derived from the view of the shaft of an arrow when looked at a certain inclination, thus the thicker part being nearer to the observer, and vice versa; as for the distance from the observer, the size of an arrow shows its location.
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  • S. FUJIWHARA, M. SANUKI
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 26-27
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    In practical meteorology we find inconvenience in adjusting the zero point and scale division of existing evaporimeter and pluviometer of balance type. In the present note we propose to make the angle between the indicator and the arm of water basin exactly 90°. The scale then becomes proportional to the tangent of the angle between the indicator and the vertical. Thus a remarkable facility is attained both in calibration of scale and in maintenance of zero point.
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  • M. SANUKI
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 28-30
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    From an aerodynamical point of view I have shown that the lift of a hemispherical cup of radius a in a steady air flow of velosity V considered as an ideal fluid is (ρ, the air density) for the angle of attack α. The Robinson factor is obtained from the balance of the aerodynamical moment due to 4 cups and the frictional moment due to the bearing in the form where γ is the length of arm and κ the coefficient of friction.
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  • H. ARAKAWA
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 30-34
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    The author studied the mechanisms of the Robinson Cup Anemometer and Helicoid Anemometer hydrodynamically. The Robincon factor and Anemometer factor, say, are expressed as a function of the velocity of wind. The rotating velocities of blades of both anemometers are found to be proportional to the velocity of wind as long as the velocity of wind is moderate.
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  • S. TAZIMA
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 34-38
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    These experiments have been made in order to investigate the effects of internal and external pressures upon the reading of a thermometer. The time lag of several thermometers has been examined. We have known that the effect of the external pressure was so small as to be practically negligible even under the low pressure as on the top of Mt. Fuji. When the thermometer was in an inverted position, its reading is about 5 per cent larger than in the normal one.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 38-41
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 41
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 42
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 42a-43
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 43-44
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 44-46
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1932 Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 46-49
    Published: 1932
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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