Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
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Articles
  • Ryo OYAMA, Masahiro SAWADA, Kazuki SHIMOJI
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 3-26
    Published: 2018
    Released: March 16, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: August 10, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The high temporal and spatial resolutions of geostationary satellite observations achieved by recent technological advancements have facilitated the derivation of atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs), even in a tropical cyclone (TC) wherein the winds abruptly change. This study used TCs in the western North Pacific basin to investigate the ability of upper tropospheric AMVs to estimate the TC intensity and structure. We first examined the relationships between the cloud-top wind fields captured by 6-hourly upper tropospheric AMVs derived from images of the Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) and the surface maximum sustained wind (MSW) of the Japan Meteorological Agency's best-track data for 44 TCs during 2011-2014. The correlation between the maximum tangential winds of the upper tropospheric AMVs (UMaxWinds) and MSWs was high, approximately 0.73, suggesting that the cyclonic circulation near the cloud top was intensified by the upward transport of absolute angular momentum within the TC inner core. The upper tropospheric AMVs also revealed that the mean radii of UMaxWinds and the maximum radial outflows shifted inward as the TC intensification rate became large, implying that the low-level inflow was strong for TCs undergoing rapid intensification. We further examined the possibility of estimating the MSW using 30-min-interval UMaxWinds derived from Himawari-8 target observations, which have been used to track TCs throughout their lifetimes. A case study considering Typhoon Lionrock (1610) showed that the UMaxWinds captured the changes in the cyclonic circulation near the cloud top within the inner core on a timescale shorter than 1 day. It was apparent that the increase in the UMaxWind was associated with the intensification of the TC warm core and the shrinkage of UMaxWind radius. These results suggest that Himawari-8 AMVs include useful information about TC intensification and related structural changes to support the TC intensity analysis and structure monitoring.

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  • Hironobu IWABUCHI, Nurfiena Sagita PUTRI, Masanori SAITO, Yuka TOKORO, ...
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 27-42
    Published: 2018
    Released: March 16, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: September 15, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     An algorithm for retrieving the macroscopic, physical, and optical properties of clouds from thermal infrared measurements is applied to the Himawari-8 multiband observations. A sensitivity study demonstrates that the addition of the single CO2 band of Himawari-8 is effective for the estimation of cloud top height. For validation, retrieved cloud properties are compared systematically with collocated active remote sensing counterparts with small time lags. While retrievals agree reasonably for single-layer clouds, multilayer cloud systems with optically thin upper clouds overlying lower clouds are the major source of error in the present algorithm. Validation of cloud products is critical for identifying the characteristics, advantages, and limitation of each product and should be continued in the future.

     As an application example, data are analyzed for eight days in the vicinity of the New Guinea to study the diurnal cycle of the cloud system. The present cloud property analysis investigates cloud evolution through separation of different cloud types and reveals typical features of diurnal cycles related to the topography. Over land, middle clouds increase from 0900 to 1200 local solar time (LST), deep convective clouds develop rapidly during 1200-1700 LST with a subsequent increase in cirrus and cirrostratus cloud amounts. Over the ocean near coastlines, a broad peak of convective cloud fraction is seen in the early morning. The present study demonstrates the utility of frequent observations by Himawari-8 for life cycle study of cloud systems, owing to the ability to capture their continuous temporal variations.

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  • Yuhei YAMAMOTO, Hirohiko ISHIKAWA
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 43-58
    Published: 2018
    Released: March 16, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 24, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared (TIR) is an essential parameter in the retrieving land surface temperature (LST) from space. This paper describes the LSE maps in three TIR bands (centered at 10.4, 11.2 and 12.4 μm) used for retrieving the LST from Himawari-8. Himawari-8, a next-generation geostationary satellite has high spatial and temporal resolutions compared to previous geostationary satellites. Because of these improvements, the Himawari-8 LST product is expected to contribute to the observation of small-scale environments in high-frequency. In this study, the LSE is estimated by a semi-empirical method, which is a combination of the classification based method and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) thresholds method. The land cover classification information is taken from the Global Land Cover by National Mapping Organizations version3 (GLCNMO 2013). Material emissivities of soil, vegetation and others are taken from the MODIS UCSB emissivity library and the ASTER spectral library. This method basically follows the semi-empirical methods developed by the previous studies, but advanced considerations are added. These considerations are the phenology of vegetation, flooding of paddy fields, snow/ice coverage, and internal reflections (cavity effect) in urban areas. The average cavity effect on LSE in urban canopies is approximately 0.01, but it reaches 0.02 in built-up areas. The sensitivity analysis shows that the total LSE errors for the three bands are less than 0.02. The LSE estimation is especially stable at the vegetation area, where the error is less than 0.01.

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  • Yuhei YAMAMOTO, Hirohiko ISHIKAWA, Yuichiro OKU, Zeyong HU
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 59-76
    Published: 2018
    Released: March 16, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 24, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     This paper presents a method for estimating the land surface temperature (LST) from Himawari-8 data. The Advanced Himawari Imager onboard Himawari-8 has three thermal infrared bands in the spectral range of 10-12.5 μm. We developed a nonlinear three-band algorithm (NTB) that makes the best use of these bands to estimate the LST. The formula of the algorithm includes 10 coefficients. The optimum values of these coefficients were derived using a statistical regression method from the simulated data, as obtained by a radiative transfer model. The simulated data sets correspond to a variety of values of LST, as well as surface emissivity, type and season of temperature and water vapor profiles. Viewing zenith angles (VZAs) from 0° to 60° were considered. For the coefficients obtained in this way, we verified the root-mean-square error (RMSE) in terms of the VZA, LST and precipitable water dependence. We showed that the NTB can accurately estimate the LST with an RMSE less than 0.9 K compared with the nonlinear split-window algorithm developed by Sobrino and Romaguera (2004). Moreover, we evaluated the sensitivities of the LST algorithms to the uncertainties in input data by using the dataset independent of the dataset used to obtain coefficients. Consequently, we showed that the NTB has the highest robustness against the uncertainties in input data. Finally, the stepwise LST retrieval method was constructed. This method includes a simple cloud mask procedure and the land surface emissivity estimation. The LST product was evaluated using in-situ data over the Tibetan Plateau, and the validity was confirmed.

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  • Miho SEKIGUCHI, Hironobu IWABUCHI, Takashi M. NAGAO, Teruyuki NAKAJIMA
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 77-89
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 08, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 08, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     We developed an atmospheric gas absorption table for the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) based on the correlated k-distribution (CKD) method with an optimization method, which was used to determine quadrature weights and abscissas. We incorporated the table and band information of the AHI into a multi-purpose atmospheric radiative transfer package, RSTAR. We updated the package so that users could easily specify the satellite and band number. Use of this update made it possible to carry out calculations rapidly and accurately using the optimized CKD method. RSTAR is easy for beginners to use and facilitates comparison of results. Cloud retrieval tests using different numbers of quadrature points showed that cloud retrievals could be significantly affected by the CKD model's accuracy.

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  • Arata OKUYAMA, Masaya TAKAHASHI, Kenji DATE, Keita HOSAKA, Hidehiko MU ...
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 91-109
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 20, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: March 30, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The new geostationary (GEO) meteorological satellite of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Himawari-8, entered operation on 7 July 2015. Himawari-8 features the new 16-band Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), whose spatial resolution and observation frequency are improved over those of its predecessor MTSAT-series satellites. These improvements will bring about unprecedented levels of performance in nowcasting services and short-range weather forecasting systems. In view of the essential nature of navigation and radiometric calibration in fully leveraging the imager's potential, this study reports on the current status of calibration for the AHI. Image navigation is accurate to within 1 km, and band-to-band coregistration has also been validated. Infrared (IR) band calibration is accurate to within 0.2 K with no significant diurnal variation and is being validated using an approach developed under the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System (GSICS) framework. Validation approaches are currently being tested for the visible and near-IR (NIR) bands. Two such approaches were compared and found to produce largely consistent results.

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  • Michiko OTSUKA, Hiromu SEKO, Kazuki SHIMOJI, Koji YAMASHITA
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 111-131
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 06, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: March 23, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Rapid scan atmospheric motion vectors (RS-AMVs) were derived using an algorithm developed by the Meteorological Satellite Center of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) from Himawari-8 rapid scan imagery over the area around Japan. They were computed every 10 min for seven different channels, namely, the visible channel (VIS), near infrared and infrared channels (IR), three water vapor absorption channels (WV), and CO2 absorption channel (CO2), from image triplets with time intervals of 2.5 min for VIS and 5 min for the other six channels. In June 2016, the amount of data was increased by more than 20 times compared to the number of routinely used AMVs. To exploit these high-resolution data in mesoscale data assimilation for the improvement of short-range forecasts, data verification, and assimilation experiments were conducted. The RS-AMVs were of sufficiently good quality for assimilation and consistent overall with winds from JMA's mesoscale analyses, radiosonde, and wind profiler observations. Errors were slightly larger in WV than in VIS and IR channels. Significant negative biases relative to sonde winds were seen at high levels in VIS, IR, and CO2, whereas slightly positive biases were noticeable in WV at mid- to high levels. Data assimilation experiments with the JMA's non-hydrostatic model based Variational Data Assimilation System (JNoVA) on a cold vortex event in June 2016 were conducted using RS-AMVs from seven channels. The wind forecasts improved slightly in early forecast hours before 12 hours in northern Japan, over which the vortex passed during the assimilation period. They also showed small improvements at low levels when averaged over the whole forecast period. The results varied slightly depending on the channels used for assimilation, which might be caused by different error characteristics of RS-AMVs in different channels.

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  • Keiya YUMIMOTO, Taichu Y. TANAKA, Mayumi YOSHIDA, Maki KIKUCHI, Takash ...
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 133-149
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 20, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: April 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) launched a next-generation geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS), Himawari-8, on October 7, 2014, which began its operation on July 7, 2015. The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) onboard Himawari-8 has 16 observational bands that enable the retrieval of full-disk maps of aerosol optical properties (AOPs), including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and the Ångström exponent (AE), with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. In this study, we combined an aerosol transport model with the Himawari-8 AOT using the data assimilation method and performed aerosol assimilation and forecasting experiments on smoke from an intensive wildfire that occurred over Siberia between May 15 and 18, 2016. To effectively utilize the high observational frequency of Himawari-8, we assimilated 1-h merged AOTs generated through the combination of six AOT snapshots taken over 10-min intervals, three times per day. The heavy smoke originating from the wildfire was transported eastward behind a low-pressure trough and covered northern Japan from May 19 to 20. The southern part of the smoke plume then traveled westward, in a clockwise flow associated with high pressure. The forecast without assimilation reproduced the transport of the smoke to northern Japan; however, it underestimated AOT and the extinction coefficient compared with observed values mainly because of errors in the emission inventory. Data assimilation with the Himawari-8 AOT compensated for the underestimation and successfully forecasted the unique C-shaped distribution of the smoke. In particular, the assimilation of the Himawari-8 AOT in May 18 greatly improved the forecast of the southern part of the smoke flow. Our results indicate that the inheritance of assimilation cycles and the assimilation of more recent observations led to better forecasting in this case of a continental smoke outflow.

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  • Pradeep KHATRI, Tadahiro HAYASAKA, Hironobu IWABUCHI, Tamio TAKAMURA, ...
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 151-172
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 20, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: April 09, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The present study implements long-term surface observed radiation data (pyranometer observed global flux and sky radiometer observed spectral zenith transmittance data) of multiple SKYNET sites to validate water cloud optical properties (cloud optical depth COD and effective radius Re) observed from space by MODIS onboard TERRA and AQUA satellites and AHI onboard Himawari-8 satellite. Despite some degrees of differences in COD and Re between MODIS and AHI, they both showed common features when validated using surface based global flux data as well as cloud properties retrieved from sky radiometer observed zenith transmittance data. In general, CODs from both satellite sensors are found to overestimated when clouds are optically thin. Among a number of factors (spatial and temporal variations of cloud, sensor and solar zenith angles), the solar zenith angle (SZA) is found to have an impact on COD difference between reflectance based satellite sensor and transmittance based sky radiometer. The Re values from the sky radiometer and satellite sensor are generally poorly correlated. The difference in Re between the sky radiometer and satellite sensor is negatively correlated with COD difference between them, which is likely due to the inherent influence of Re retrieval precision on COD retrieval and vice versa in transmittance based sky radiometer.

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Notes and Correspondence
  • Nurfiena Sagita PUTRI, Hironobu IWABUCHI, Tadahiro HAYASAKA
    2018 Volume 96B Pages 239-250
    Published: 2018
    Released: September 20, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: January 23, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     Two case studies of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) in the Indonesian region were conducted by applying an improved “Grab ‘em Tag ‘em Graph ‘em” (GTG) tracking algorithm and the Integrated Cloud Analysis System (ICAS) algorithm to Himawari-8 AHI infrared data. The first case over Java Island showed a land-originating MCS in the boreal winter, which coincided with a wet phase of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the Maritime Continent. The second case showed the evolution of MCS under the influence of a strong vertical wind shear during the boreal summer. The cloud top height (CTH) of deep convective part in the first case was larger than that in the second case, while the temporal evolution of CTH was similar between the two cases. For the anvil part, the median CTH of the second case was relatively stable at around 13 km, while that of the first case showed a considerable temporal variation ranging from 14 to 16 km. The cloud-particle effective radius (CER) of the anvil increased after the period of maximum deep convective CTH in both cases, although the CER was slightly larger in the second case than in the first case. These differences in cloud properties between the two cases were attributable to the background wind profiles.

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