Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 3 , Issue 5
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Suminosuke ONO
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 113-117
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This paper is bublished in a complete from in an “Annual Report of the Central Meteorological Observatory of Japan”: Magnetic Observations for the Year 1916, and an abstract in Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity, March 1924. Following are written in Japanese in abstracted form. In the original paper the value of sensibility of magnetograms which was used to show numerical example was mistaken. Corrected tables are shown in the authors second paper Investigation on Range of the Variation of Magnetic Elements published i the Annual Report of the Central Meteorological Observatory of Japan: On the Magnetic storms observed at Kakioka, Japan in 1917 and 1920. It will appear in corrected form in Japanese Joural of Astronomy and Geophysics. Vol. III.
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  • Kameziro HAN'I
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 117-122
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    In Mount Weather Bulletin, E Gold has shown that the diurnal variation of the amount of precipitation is negatively correlated with the diurnal variation of pressure. In his excellent book “Rain” Prof. T. Okada noticed the double oscillation in diurnal variation of precipitation in Japanese stations. The author investigated in the same problem using the records for 30 years taken at 11 stations in Japan. The result is that there are just many types of the variation of precipitation in Japan as shown in Hann's “Lehrbuch.” In Japan the amplitude of the diurnal variation decreases as the latitude increases. Of the two maxima of two double oscillations, the forenoon one is greater at the southern Japanese stations and the afternoon one is greater at the northern ones. (3) The time difference between the maximum phase of the precipitation and the minimum phase of the pressure varies between 2 to 4 hours and the difference is greater as to proceed more east in Japan.
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  • Siro TAKAYAMA
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 123-128
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    From a statistical research on the cotton crops in America from 1866 to 1923 the author noticed: -(1) The tendency of negative correlation exists between the crops and sunspot activity (area is concerned). (2) In the increasing phase especially near the minimum of spot-activity, the crops have tendency to increase; in the decreasing phase, especially near the minimum of spot activity, the crops have tendency to increase. In the decreasing phase, especially near the maximum, of the spot activity, the crops tend to decrease. (3) The crops remarkably decrease when the spot activity strikingly increases near its maximum phase, and the crops markedly increase when the spot activity decreases conspicuously near its minimum phase. (4) The correlation between the crops and spot activity exists but it is not as sufficiently large as to be numerically formulated.
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  • Katutosi TAGUTI
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 128-130
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    (1) Paper by Katutosi Taguti. (The original paper in Japanese pages 128-130)
    After the author, there are three kinds of famine brought to Japan in past 2 centuries: -1. Due to cyclonic storm or flood. 2. Due to general coolness and long continued rainfall in summer months. 3. Due to drought.
    Among them, that due to general coolness is most serious in Japan. On examining the past record the author found that the famine of worst nature occurred when the sunspot cycle is large i.e. the cycle in which the total sunspot number is largest. For example, in 1782, 1783 and 1786 general coolness in summer destroyed the rice crops of these years. Many people died of hunger. The average sunspot number for the cycle 1775-1784 was 62.4, which was one maximum of six cycles from 1755 to 1823. In 1833, 1835 and 1836, nearly the same circumstances took place, which years lie in the maximum cycle of 1833-1843. etc. These relation is shown in Fig. I in Japanese page 130.
    (2) Paper by K. Yamazawa. (The original note in Japanese pages 131-134)
    The author used the record of rice crops in Hida province for 174 years beginning in 1750. He classified the annual crops as rich, normal, poor and famine. The frequencies of the years with each of these 4 types are tabulated as follows.
    This result shows that rich crops and famine have more chance to appear inthe period of the greater cycle and poor crops in that of the smaller cycle. The author took statistics in various ways. All those results agree very well to affirm the above results. Table in Japanese p. 132 shows the distribution of crops during 174 years.
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  • Kingoro YAMAZAWA
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 131-134
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    (1) Paper by Katutosi Taguti. (The original paper in Japanese pages 128-130)
    After the author, there are three kinds of famine brought to Japan in past 2 centuries: -1. Due to cyclonic storm or flood. 2. Due to general coolness and long continued rainfall in summer months. 3. Due to drought.
    Among them, that due to general coolness is most serious in Japan. On examining the past record the author found that the famine of worst nature occurred when the sunspot cycle is large i.e. the cycle in which the total sunspot number is largest. For example, in 1782, 1783 and 1786 general coolness in summer destroyed the rice crops of these years. Many people died of hunger. The average sunspot number for the cycle 1775-1784 was 62.4, which was one maximum of six cycles from 1755 to 1823. In 1833, 1835 and 1836, nearly the same circumstances took place, which years lie in the maximum cycle of 1833-1843. etc. These relation is shown in Fig. I in Japanese page 130.
    (2) Paper by K. Yamazawa. (The original note in Japanese pages 131-134)
    The author used the record of rice crops in Hida province for 174 years beginning in 1750. He classified the annual crops as rich, normal, poor and famine. The frequencies of the years with each of these 4 types are tabulated as follows.
    This result shows that rich crops and famine have more chance to appear in the period of the greater cycle and poor crops in that of the smaller cycle. The author took statistics in various ways. All those results agree very well to affirm the above results. Table in Japanese p. 132 shows the distribution of crops during 174 years.
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  • Sanzi SUNAMI
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 134-137
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Kingoro YAMAZAWA
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 137-139
    Published: June 20, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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