Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 2 , Issue 5
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Katue MISAWA
    1924 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 137-144
    Published: October 15, 1924
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The author has already published a report on the remarkable glaze storm which occurred on January 22 and 23, 1923 in Nagauo Prefecture, Japan. (this journal 1923 p. 48-49). On April 5, 1923, a similar storm occurred in the same Prefecture, which was of a remarkably wide extent, covering the middle part of the Prefecture in the region near the mountain ranges facing the slope toward the Pacific and Japan Sea coasts respectively. The phenomenon was apparently due to the encounter of cold and warm air currents on the rear of a squall line which traversed the district at that time. The glaze occurred in a zone between the rain and snow areas, apparently only in those regions where the cold current was developed to a proper degree. The glaze generally set in at a high level and proceeded from thence toward the lower countries. At the upper boundary of the zone, glaze gradually yielded to snow in amount as the level ascent and a little above there was no trace of glaze but snow. The orographic conditions seem to affect remarkable the development of the warm and cold currents, so that the belt of region visited by the glaze shows a very irregular trend, Comparing the present case with the former, the author noticed that:-
    (1) Owing to the greater amount of absorption of the solar radiation by the object consisting the core of glaze than that by ice itself a considerable space was formed by the melting of the ice near the core.
    (2) The unsymmetrical growth of glaze on the wind side of any object was equally remarkable this time as on the last occasion.
    (3) The glaze on telegraphic wires grew toward one side or up ward according to the intensi_??_y and direction of the wind prevailing at that time. When the inner part of the mass of ice in contact with the wire melted, it turned (about 70° to 180°) down by the gravity, then it melted quickly at the upper side of the wires and at last fell down, leaving a cavity as shown in fig. in p. 139.
    Download PDF (456K)
  • Katutosi TAGUTI
    1924 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 145-146
    Published: October 15, 1924
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    On 1913 Prof. F. Omori noticed a peculiar variation of the sea level recorded at different Japanese, Italian and Austrian Mareographic stations, and gave a concluding remark “......a horizontal pressure applied from the inner side against the Japan arc, which is thus still in the process of change or growth, the consequence being the frequent production of seismic disturbances of gigantic magnitude. Under these circumstances it is natural that the land of Japan should present phenomena of the land elevation and depression. It seems probable that much light may be thrown on the instability of our earthquake country by a careful investigation of the variation in hight of the sea-level. etc.” Ten years, have elapsed and the Great Sagami-Bay Earthquake took place in the vicinity of Misaki, where Prof. Omori has pointed out the greatest secular elevation of the sea-level. In this respect the author getting data from the Military Survey Department calculated the variation of the sea-level observed at 10 Mareographic Stations since 1900-1923 and tabulated in p. 145. Figures in the table represent the excess or deficit from the average water stand in millimeter. It is seen that at Kusimo_??_o the variation is greatest.
    Download PDF (105K)
  • Morisaburo MISU
    1924 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 146-152
    Published: October 15, 1924
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A village named Kogo, in Ena District, Gihu Prefecture, casualities due to lightning were reported in August, 1922 and July, 1923. On the former occasion, a person struck came off with temporary fainting, while on the latter two women and a horese were killed. From the results of the investigations, the author remarks the followings: (1) The occurence of the casualities, which are otherwise regarded as rare in mountainous districts, are to be attributed to a special topographical condition of the district here concerued. (2) The thunderstorm, though proceeded generally along the valley, it occurred at well that it crossed a mountain ridge from one valley to another. It seems therefore that the effect of gravity as quoted by Defant was superceded on this occasion by the influence of an upper air current. (3) The thunderstorm in the present case increased its energy by coalescing with another. (4) The horse killed was shod, while the pony not shod was saved, which was standing near by. The two wommen killed were similarly nuder conditions apparently favourable for conducting the discharge.
    Download PDF (455K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1924 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 153-155
    Published: October 15, 1924
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (183K)
feedback
Top