Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 3 , Issue 4
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Siro OHTI
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 83-95
    Published: May 10, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the neighbourhood of Japan there are three stations at which the date of the first snow is earlier than that of the first frost in nearly each year. These are Chefoo, Minatuki and Aikawa. At Sisakazima the date of the first snow is a little earlier than that of the first frost in the average but not always in individual cases. On finding this peculiar fact, the author first noticed that all these stations are situated on island or sea side and facing toward north or northwest. Hence winter northwesterly monsoon blows from over the sea at these stations. On the authors opinion it is very likely that the nocturnal cooling in early winter nights at these stations can not be sufficient to cause frost owing to the heat supply from the sea water. Meanwhile the outbreak of cold continental air will occur. The wind will come fast sweeping over the sea, absorbing moisture to some extent and on encountering the first land, it will precipitate moisture in form of snow. This reasoning seems rather proper but there is still difficulty that there are many stations under nearly the same condition as those three but without earlier snowfall. The author then found that at these three stations the northwesterly monsoon is especially intense. The formation of night frost, which is favoured by the calm transparent air, must be hindered by the monsoon at these stations. The isochronals for the first frost and snow and the curve for equal interval between the first frost and snow is charted in fig. 2, 3 and 4. (Japanese page 93, 94.) The wind velocities at various stations are tabulated in Japanese pages.
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  • Kameziro HAN'I
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 95-102
    Published: May 10, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Southerly wind at Nase is well known among Japanese weather-men as an indication for the coming rain. T. Yamazaki had already investigated the reliability of the indicator and showed that the expectation of rain at Kobe on the new setting-in of southerly wind at Nase was very high. The present author took statistics for the late 6 years which elapsed since Yamazaki's investigation and obtained the expectation of 89% of coming rain at Nase on the breaking in of southerlies for winter months.
    On Haze: by K. Matsuyama (Japanese page 102-104): The auther cannot be contented with noting down simply ∞ for haze on his field note. His desire is to classify haze according to its mechanism or origin.
    His tentative clasification is that
    1 Hzae in narrower sence {(a) Yellow sand haze (b) Dust haze (C) Smoke haze}
    2 Kasumi (that is misty or waterly)
    3 Yellow sand
    (i, a) Yellow sand haze; Having yellowish red tint, diffusingly cover the sky, making no apparent stratification most frequent in Spring and Summer.
    (i, b) Dust haze; with thin gray tint. Occurs by strong wind after long drought; Street dust, Volcanic ashes etc. beeing its origin.
    (i, c) Smoke haze, well known.
    (ii) Kasumi (explained in the preceeding number of this Journal) whitish tint. Not likely to be observed in city atmosphere; misty and waterly.
    (iii) Yellow sand; more distinct one with the same character as (i, a); minute earthen powder whirled up by cyelonic storm on the continent and brought to Japan across the sea.
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  • Kinziro MATSUYAMA
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 102-106
    Published: May 10, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1925 Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 107-108
    Published: May 10, 1925
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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