Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 28 , Issue 2
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Y. Saito
    1950 Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 35-61
    Published: 1950
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In 1942, Dr. M. Okamoto discussed a case of the drift current in a polytropic ocean when the wind sweeps over a finite area of the surface. But, since the sea is not bounded by land in his discussion, his treatment is not exact, because Sx and Sy, where Sx and Sy mean the total flow, are used simultaneously as conditions of continuity.
    Thus, in the present paper, the author tried to obtain a complete analytical solution for the problem in a rotating canal, taking account of the term of the horizontal kinematic viscosity Vx, and Vy, and that of the. vertical kinematic viscosity Vz.
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  • H. Arakawa
    1950 Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 62-66
    Published: 1950
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is well known that the orographic rainfall in Japan is strongly influenced according to their path of cyclones. Under simplified assumptions as (1) the Japanese archipelagoes can be represented by a straight barrier, and (2) the intensities of rainfall are proportional to the quantity of air flow ascending the straight barrier forced by the cyclonic wind system, the close relationship between the path of cyclones and the orographic rainfall has been deduced by quite kinematic way. The intensity of rainfall has been estimated for the two representative cases, i.e., (1) a depression advanced along the Japanese archipelagoes, and (2) a depression crossed the Japanese archipelagoes perpendicularly.
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  • S. Ogiwara
    1950 Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 66-70
    Published: 1950
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In 1915 .G. I. Taylor obtained a formula expressing the rate of the vertical transfer of heat by turbulence. In obtaining this he assumed that there is no resultant transfer of mass across any horizontal plane. However, when the heat is transferred vertically and the vertical distribution of temperature changes, the change of the vertical distribution of pressure. will follow. This means that the mass is transferred vertically and so Taylor's assumption is not correct. We obtained an equation which expresses the rate of the vertical transfer of heat and the change of the temperature of the air taking the transfer of mass into consideration and compared this with the results obtained by observations.
    The equation expressing the rate of change of temperature was given by where K is the eddy conductivity and _??_ is the dry adiabatic lapse rate of the air temperature. The second term of the right-hand side of the above equation arises due to the effect of the vertical transport of air being taken into consideration.
    As an example the diurnal variation of the upper air temperature was obtained from the above equation and it was compared with the result from Taylor's equation and the observed values at Lindenberg. In the above table, K was assumed to be 105.
    From the above table we can find that Taylor's result holds only below 500m and the discrepancy increases with height. On the contrary, our result holds fairly good up to higher levels even if K is assumed to be constant.
    Details will be published in the Science Report of Tohoku University Series V, Vol. 1. No 3.
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  • Y. Miyata
    1950 Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 71-76
    Published: 1950
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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