Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 13 , Issue 1
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • M. KAWANO
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 1-6
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The angular distribution of the cosmic radiation has been investigated as a function of the angle from the vertical on the summit of Mt. Huzi (γ=35°22', elevation 3700m), at a base station (Gotenba, elevation 460m) and at two stations between them (elevations 2800m and 1300m). The east-west effect has also been studied. The distributions at all stations are similar in concentration about the vertical, showing the composite nature of the radiation, Excess of some 10 to 15% of west over east-value is clearly recognized at an angle 30° at all stations. At an angle 60° the excess appears clearly on the summit. The mean absorption coefficient was calculated with the assumption of simple exponential law with the result μ=34.3×10-3g-1cm2. (period of observation: 1934, August-September)
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  • K. TERADA
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 6-12
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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  • M. YOSHITAKE
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 13-16
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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  • N. YAMAMOTO
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 16-20
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    I have determined the space charge of the e_??_rth's electric field at various heights from the standpoints of current continuity, potential, gaseous conduction and gravity.
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  • S. SAKURABA
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 21-27
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    The theory of land and see breeze has aleady been attacked by various authors with some success in their respective manners. Here the present author also treated this problem from a little different stand-point of view. By properly omitting unnecessary terms in their magnitudes in the equations of motion, continuity and heat conduction, the author solved them, putting the distribution of temperature at the surface in the form; The result of our solution shows that the coefficients of kinematic eddy viscosity and eddy thermal diffusivity will have the numerical values ranging from 108 to 109, in their most, in C. G. S. units, which will be admissible in consideration of the scale of the influence domain of motion.
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  • S. TAKAYA
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 27-43
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    In Chapter I of this paper, the steady flow of air subjected to the isothermal and adiabatic changes along a mountain of Pockels' form was firstly treated by the aid of the stream function. As simple examples of vortical motion we take the case of two vortices lying wind-and leeward of a mountain which are caused by the effect of the profile itself. The configulations of the stream-lines are shown in Fig. I and Fig. II according as the upper boundary is a plane or a curved surface.
    In Chapter II, we take firstly two problems for a current flowing with the general velocity past a fixed cylindrical obstacle when the slight variations of densities of fluid follow the laws ρ=ρ0(1-mrcosθ) and ρ=ρ0(1+ma2/r2cosθ), the solutions being obtained by the method of successive approximation derived by Airy. The forms of the stream-lines are shown in Fig. III and Fig IV. The same method stated above is also applicable to the case of vortical motion in a cylindrical vessel, the density of fluid varying at very slow rate with ρ=ρ0(1+mrcosθ) Fig. V shews, with, of course, exaggerated magnitude in m, the stream-lines of the motion which is symmetrical with a certain radius.
    The problem for the motion in a cyclone relating to the case of symmetry about the axis was discussed. It can be solved from the hydrodynamical equations by separating into two parts, one the gradient wind system and the other vortical system. The solution for the latter was found to be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions.
    In Chapter III, the flow of air past a fixed spherical obstacle was discussed as the density of fluid varies according to the law ρ=ρ0(1+ma3/r3sinφ), the solution being obtained by the same method as Chapter II. The forms of the stream-lines were shewn in Fig. IV.
    The circulation of the atmosphere with constant density in a spherical shell were then treated as a three-dimensional problem. The solution for a simpler case where f(x)=ax, F(x)=0 as shewn in equation (33) was easily obtained in terms of the associated Legendre functions, while in the case where f(x)=ax, F(x)=-b2/s2x the solution for the equation such as (43) was expressed by the terms of the continued fractions as derived by Kelvin and Darwin used for integrating the dynamical equations of the tides. Fig. VII and Fig. VIII corresponds to the former, the degree of the function being 2, 4, 6 and 8, and Fig. IX refers to the latter. The latter is the case in which the close coincidence of the observed and theoretical values shews the existence of this mode of circulation in the actual atmosphere.
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  • H. NOTO, Y. MOTOMURA
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 43-49
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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    The period of the Gustiness was chiefly investigated and it was found that the longest period which was experienced when the velocity of wind was small reached 200 seconds or more, but when the velocity of wind exceeded over 10 metres the period became under 10 seconds and was nearly equal. The amplitude which was taken as the difference between the smallest and the largest values within 20 minutes was investigated and somewhat different from those generally treated. If Amax, is diffined as such a special meaning, or the amplitude of exteremity, it is expressed by the following relation,
    Amax=0.64X Wind Velocity
    The relation can be held through the whole range of Wind Velocity.
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  • H. KURASIGE
    1935 Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 50
    Published: 1935
    Released: February 05, 2009
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