Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II
Online ISSN : 2186-9057
Print ISSN : 0026-1165
ISSN-L : 0026-1165
Volume 26 , Issue 6
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • G. Yamamoto, M. Siotani
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 149-157
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The data of atmospheric turbulence at Maubasi were further analysed, and discussed the effects of changing the time, interval, on which mean wind velocity was calculated and on which all other characteristic quantities concerning turbulence were deduced. It was also discused the so-called Taylor number on atmospheric turbulence in relation with that of wind tunnel turbulence.
    Download PDF (670K)
  • Y. Miyake, T. Hamada, K. Saito, S. Hosoi
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 157-161
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Water of the Nagase River in Fukushima Prefecture which flows into the Lake Inawashiro is well known by its strong acidity. Observations were done by the authors on the distribution of pH along the river. It was fonnd that the origine of acid is due to the hot spring Nakanosawa which is strongly acidic by its sulphuric and hydrochloric acid content. By this acidic water the Nagase River and also the Iake Inawashiro are polluted in which fishes can not live. The distribution of other chemical constituents were also studied.
    Download PDF (303K)
  • T. Hosino, S. Shono
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 161-169
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is well known that the prevailing westerly wind is a result of the general circulation of atmosphere, and essentially, when an air mass displaces from lower latitude to higher latitude following the law of the conservation of angular momentum, the westerly component becomes mo_??_e strong on account of rotation of the globe. So, the s_??_rength of the prevailing wind are only controlled by meridional circulations. As a souse to make this meridional circulations hasten, We considered a low pressure part at higher level when the monsoon bursts out from the Mongorian anticyclone rapidly in winter. and excites the compensation current from the sorroundings especially from south into this part of low pressure, then the meridional circulations are hastened and prevailing westerly wind becomes strong. Basing on this consideration, we got a new method of wind forecasting at higher level by using the pres ure pattern at ground prevailing in winter, We can predict the wind velocity at higher level with errors of about 10m/sec, using the above method.
    Download PDF (648K)
  • H. Matui
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 169-171
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The investigation was carried out for the purpose of measuring the condensation nuclei essential for the formation of fog.
    The Chemical Compositions of fog water at Hitoyosi, Kumamoto Prefecture are as follows:
    The writer demonstrated that coal produced nuclei if this fuel were burnt. In my previous paper. it was shown that sea salt particles driven up from sea-surface are entirely sufficient to serve as condensation nuclei.
    From the analytical data mentioned above, the writer has proved that condensation nucle are mainly comp_??_sed of combustion products from coal (sulphuric acid. ammonia, soot, coal ashes etc.) or of sea salt particles dispersed in the atmosphere (CaSO4. Na2SO4 NaCl etc.).
    Download PDF (251K)
  • S. Hirase, T. Kogure
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 172-174
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We observed how the direction of wind is disturbed by a U-shapad schoolhouse and abcertained that the distarbance depends on velocity. whose degree may be classified into nearly three typas. The reason why these phenomena took place was researched by model experiments.
    Download PDF (259K)
  • H. Hatakeyama
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 174-175
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The smoke cloud of the air-raid fire of Yokohama covered the area beyond Mito. The Kakioka Magne_??_ic Observatory was also covered by this cloud and the Benndorf's electrograph recorded the variation o the atmospheric potential gradient due to the cloud. The potential gradient was about 17 V/M at first. When the tip of the cloud reached the zen_??_th the gradient began to decrease, and after about half an hour, when the sky was covered with dense black smoke-cloud it reached about O V/M. The height of the top and the ba e of the cloud was estimated about 1300 m and 700 m at Mt. Tsukuba Observatory.
    The density of the spa e-charge in the smoke-cloud is estimates at 0.0075 esu/m3. And it is also estimated that it is about 0.3 esu/m3 at Yokohama. It is about he same degree of magnitude with that in the case of the cloud of smoke of the Volcano Asama, the dust storm, the snowstorm and the smoke of the locomotive.
    Download PDF (151K)
  • H. Hatakeyama
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 175
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The temperature distr bution between the surface of the skin and the surface of the quilt, when a man lies down on the bed, was measured by the thermo-couple. The heet-loss through the quilt is 9-14 kcal/h. m2 which is about one severalth of that through the clothes, when a man is standing. The heat transfer coeffcient concerning to the surface of the quilt, which spreads horizontally, is 6.4 which is about half of that to the verticai surface of the cloth.
    Download PDF (76K)
  • H. Hatakeyama
    1948 Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 175a-176
    Published: October 05, 1948
    Released: February 05, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The humidity in the boxes made of Sugi (Japanese cedar), Hinoki (Japanese cypress), Kiri (paulownia) and etc. was observed by hygrographs from Sept, 1941, to Nov. 1942. There was little difference in the humidity variation in each kind of woods and in each size of boxes. When the range of the humidity variation with the period from several days to about half a month in the room is about 20%, that in the box is only about 5%, The range of the seasonal variation is about 20%, in the room and about 15% in the box.
    Download PDF (160K)
feedback
Top