Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 4 , Issue 1-2
Showing 1-18 articles out of 18 articles from the selected issue
  • Y. NISIKADO, H. MATSUMOTO, K. YAMAUTI
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-12
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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    The present paper is an introductory report of the writers' studies on the Fusarium-blight of wheat, caused by Gibberella saubinetii (MONT.) SACC. (Fusarium graminearum SCHWABE), and deals with the physiological specialization of the causal fungus.
    The fungus attacks wheat, barley and other cereals and causes not only the head-blight but also the seedling-blight everywhere in Nippon (Japan). It is one of the most serious menace to the wheat industry in our country.
    The physiological specialization has been proved to be common in many of pathogenic species of Fusarium, and the studies on this problem are important. Therefore the writers began their investigation on this phase of the causal fungus. One hundred and twenty four strains of Gibberella saubinetii (MONT.) SACC. were isolated from the diseased ears of wheat and barley, which were sent to the writers from various parts of Nippon. The pathogenicity of these strains was studied by inoculation experiments. After surface disinfection, wheat grains inoculated with the conidium suspension of each of these strains, and were sown in sand in flowerpots, which were previously sterilized under fifteen pounds pressure for from two to four hours. The percentages of the germinatel wheat grains, and of the diseased seedling affected after the germination were studied by triplicated inoculation-experiments. An example of the results is given in Table I.
    For the comparison of pathogenicity of each of the Fusarium strains to wheat seedlings, the writers preferred the percentages of the healthy seedlings secured, to the total wheat grains sown. The mean percentages of the healthy seedlings developed from the inoculated grains were computed, together with the differences between each of these mean percentages and that of the uninoculated control wheat, and the ratios of these differences to their probable errors. The results are given in Table II.
    The figures in Table II show that some of the strains tested were very strong in their pathogenicity to the wheat seedlings. The differences between the mean percentages of healthy seedlings of some strains and that of the control are 20 to 50 times of their probable errors. Evidently such strains are strongly pathogenic to wheat, at least under the circumstances tested. On the other hand, in some strains the differences are only under three or five times of their probable errors. These strains should be assumed to be non-pathogenic to wheat. Between the strains showing the extremely strong and weak pathogenicity, a number of strains of intermediate strength are found, according to these results.
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  • T. NISIKÔRI
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 13-20
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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    1. The results of the inoculation experiment with uredospores of Puccinia triticina ERIKS. on barley show that seedlings of 13 varieties tested are susceptible in summer and autumn.
    2. The uredosori on barley seedlings are fewer in numder and smaller in size than those on the susceptible wheat plant. But the pathogenicity of the uredospores produced on barley is not changed and they can infect barley and wheat again.
    3. In the course of winter, these barley seedlings show a high degree of resistance against the fungus.
    4. When inoculated in winter, the germ tubes enter the leaves freely through the stomata, but some of the infecting hyphae stop their growth, producing haustrium mother cells, without forming haustoria and these hyphae soon die. The wall of the host cells in contact with this dead hyphae is swollen and deeply stained with safranin. Occasionally some haustoria are developed, but sooner or later they collapse and die together with the invaded cells.
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  • S. TAKIMOTO
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 21-24
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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    1. The present paper deals with a study carried out by the writer on some characters of a new fungus which causes an anthracnose of azuki bean.
    2. The disease first appears on the under surface of the leaves of the host, as circular, reddish-brown spots. Pale-coloured specks are produced just opposite them, which later become conspicuously brown.
    3. Artificial infection with this fungus was secured on azuki bean, cowpea and kidney bean.
    4. A certain fungus isolated from cow-pea was found by the writer to be identical with the present fungus.
    5. As the causal fungus of this disease is hitherto undescribed, the name of Colletotrichum phaseolorum is proposed for this organism.
    Colletotrichum phaseolorum n. sp.
    Acervuli which are imperfect and subepidermal rupture and compose irregular or hemisphaerical mycelial mass in which setae surrounded by conidia are formed. Conidia are mostly fusiform, 17-20×3-7μ in size, rarely cylindrical or spindle-shaped. Conidiophores are short; setae are dark brown, one to three celled, 60-110×3-4μ (on Phaseolus radiatus, L. var. aurea, PRAIN.), 60-120×3-4μ (on Vigna Catiang, var. sinensis, KING.), one to several from an acervulus. On potato agar black coriaceous colony is formed. Temperature for growth ranges between 9-36°C, optimum 30°C. It is parasitic on Azuki bean (Phaseolus radiatus, L. var. aurea, PRAIN.), cow-pea (Vigna Caliang, var. sinensis, KING.) and Kidney beau (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.)
    Type specimens are collected in Nakahara, Kasuyagun, Hukuoka Pref., June 1922, Oonomura, Tikusigun, Hukuoka Pref., Aug. 1933 on Azuki bean, and in Hakozaki, Kasuyagun, Hukuoka Pref., Sept. 1924, Sept. 1925, Aug. 1933 on cow-pea
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  • Eikichi KAWAMURA
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 25-28
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 29-31
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 31-32
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 32-33
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 33-34
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 35-36
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 37-39
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 39-42
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 56-65
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 65-74
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 74-84
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 84-92
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 92-100
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 101-109
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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  • 1934 Volume 4 Issue 1-2 Pages 110-115
    Published: 1934
    Released: March 26, 2009
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