Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 46 , Issue 2
Showing 1-25 articles out of 25 articles from the selected issue
  • Mitsuro HYAKUMACHI, Kiroku KOBAYASHI, Tadao UI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 121-125
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Among 35 isolates selected from various anastomosis groups of Rhizoctonia solani, 22 isolates produced fumaric acid (FA) in their culture. As far as we know, FA has not previously been known as a metabolite of R. solani. No relationship with pathogenicity has been seen in FA productivity. Among the anastomosis groups there has been no difference in FA productivity, but a great difference has been seen among the isolates. In sugar beet roots naturally infected by R. solani a great amount of FA (47μg/g, fr. wt.) was detected, and in sugar beet root slices which had been artificially infected by inoculation with R. solani a little FA was detected.
    Download PDF (263K)
  • Tadaoki INABA, Toshihiko HINO, Toshihiro KAJIWARA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 126-131
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Conidia of Java corn downy mildew fungus, Peronosclerospora maydis (Racib.) C. G. Shaw [Sclerospora maydis (Racib.) Butl.], were formed on the upper part of diseased corn leaves which were in the process of development or had just developed, but they were not formed on the basal part. This phenomenon was observed in each diseased leaf of a plant and also in both leaves with half-leaf and full-systemic symptoms. When inoculated plants were incubated at 25 C-20 C (daytime-night, 12 hr each) for different durations, the sporulating areas of developing leaves were narrow 20 and 30 days after inoculation (the 7th-8th and the 10th-11th leaves, respectively), being limited to the upper part of the leaves. After 40 and 50 days the sporulation occurred on the whole leaf surface of these leaves (the 7th-10th leaves), and the sporulating areas of newly developing leaves were quite wide (the 13th-14th and the 14th-15th leaves, respectively) compared with the areas of those after 20 and 30 days. The speed of leaf elongation on developing leaves was higher after 20 and 30 days (the 7th-8th and the 10th-11th leaves, respectively) than after 40 and 50 days (the 13th-14th and the 14th-15th leaves, respectively). Namely, the faster the leaf elongation, the narrower the sporulating area. These results indicate that sporulation ability is closely related to the host leaf growth and that the ability on a site of leaf appears after a certain period of time after the emergence of the leaf site.
    Download PDF (789K)
  • Kuniyuki MIYAJIMA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 132-139
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fifteen phages of Pseudomonas fuscovaginae (the pathogen of sheath brown rot of rice plants) isolated from infected flag leaf-sheaths, rotted seedlings and diseased seeds in Hokkaido prefecture, Japan, were classified into three groups by their host ranges and forms of plaques. None of phage strains FP 1, FP 2 and FP 3 attacked any of 55 species of other bacteria that included 35 species of pseudomonads. The phage particles of all strains were all tadpoleshaped, consisting of a polyhedral head and a tail. FP 1 and FP 3 had a head of 60 and 50nm in diameter, respectively, both with a contractile tail; and FP 2 had a head of 59nm with a long noncontractile tail. The thermal inactivation point of FP 1 was at 70 C for 10min in PB medium, whereas for FP 2 and FP 3 it was 60 C. The optimum temperature for plaque formation was 25-28 C for all phages. The one-step growth curve of phage FP 1 indicated that the latent period was about 110min, the rise period was 130min, and the average burst size was 220 PFU/cell in PB medium at 25 C.
    Download PDF (937K)
  • Yasuo HOMMA, Yutaka ARIMOTO, Hiroharu TAKAHASHI, Takehiro ISHIKAWA, Iz ...
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 140-149
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Conidial germination, hyphal elongation and penetration of Leveillula taurica (Lev.) Arn. on the leaf surface of peppers were observed using both optical and electron microscopes.
    Germination of conidia of L. taurica reached the maximum level of about 70% within 2 to 3hr after inoculation. Each conidium bore a germ tube at the tip of which an appressorium was formed at 3hr after inoculation. Conidial germination initiated in most cases from the base of conidia, in some cases from the tip of conidia and in rare cases even from the middle of conidia. There was only one germ tube in any case of conidial germination. Almost all of the germ tubes initiated to form appressoria within 3hr after inoculation. There were two types of appressoria formed on the pepper leaves: namely, one was a fist-like appressorium in shape formed immediately after conidial germination, while the other was a pier-like appressorium formed on extended hyphae. The latter showed a tendency to bifurcate two or three times. Neither type of appressoria bore haustria, but seemed to play the role of fixing the germ tube or hypha to the leaf surface. The hyphae initially grew in a winding fashion, forming appressoria a few times and penetrating through the stomata by branched hyphae in most cases or, in rare instances, by main axial hyphae on the lower leaf surface. After the first penetration, the hyphae elongated, branched at a right angle to the parent hyphae and penetrated further through the stomata by the tips of the branches. After penetrating two or three times the hyphae continued to develop in a straight line, reaching about 2, 700μm in length 6 days after inoculation. In this fungus, the colonies were fan-shaped, and not circular or oval as in the case of some ecto-parasitic powdery mildews.
    Download PDF (2278K)
  • Shiro KUNINAGA, Ryozo YOKOSAWA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 150-158
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Base composition of DNAs of 30 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani Kühn was compared. The relationships between the base composition of DNA and each anastomosis group or cultural type were investigated.
    The range of guanine plus cytosine (GC) content of R. solani DNA was 40.9 to 49.3 mole%, and its average was 45.3 mole%. The GC contents of the isolates within each anastomosis group were almost same. Little difference of GC content was observed between the sasakii type (IA) and the web-blight type (IB) in AG-1. Furthermore GC contents of the rush type (IIIB) and the root rot type (IV) in AG-2-2, were quite similar. While a significant difference was observed between the potato type (IV) in AG-3 and the root rot type (IV).
    AG-1 showed the highest GC content (avg. 48.8 mole%) among all of the anastomosis groups, followed by AG-4 (avg. 47.3 mole%), AG-3 (avg. 47.1 mole%), AG-5 (avg. 45.2mole%), AG-2-2 (avg. 44.6 mole%), AG-2-1 (avg. 43.7 mole%), AG-6 (avg. 41.8 mole%) and AG-BI (avg. 41.4 mole%).
    These results suggest that each anastomosis group must be regarded as a genetically independent unit.
    Download PDF (384K)
  • Kaoru HANADA, Hiroshi TOCHIHARA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 159-168
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Four strains of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y, CMV-L, CMV-E and CMV-P), Peanut stunt virus (PSV) and chrysanthemum mild mottle virus (CMMV) had a tripartite genome. Molecular weights of RNA's of CMV, PSV, and CMMV in aqueous gels were determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Analysis utilizing pseudorecombinants constructed by RNA3 exchange between CMV strains or between GMV-L and CMMV revealed that serotypes were determined by RNA3, while symptoms on cucumber and cowpea plants depended on RNA1+2. Furthermore when RNA 1 and RNA 2 were exchanged between CMV strains, symptoms on cowpea depended on RNA2.
    Download PDF (1265K)
  • Takahito SUZUI, Tokio MAKINO, Akira OGOSHI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 169-178
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An outbreak of Phytophthora rot of strawberry cv. Reiko and Hoko-Wase was recorded in Shizuoka Prefecture in 1978. Diseased plants showed crown, petiole and root rot as well as wilt. Phytophthora sp. was isolated from the diseased tissues. The fungus was identified as P. nicotianae var. parasitica from characteristics of sporangia and sex organs, cardinal temperature and electrophoresis. All of isolates of P. nicotianae var. parasitica were of the mating type A2. Artificial inoculation with isolated fungus caused crown, petiole and root rot of strawberry plants and the inoculum was recovered.
    Download PDF (1522K)
  • Masafumi MATSUZAKI, Masamiti KAN, Akira KISO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 179-184
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A new disease of strawberry caused by Phytophthora sp. was found in Saga and Fukuoka Prefecture on August 1978. The symptoms of the disease appeared on crown and leaves of strawberry grown in the nursery beds. Phytophthora sp. was isolated with high frequency from crown and leaves of infected young plants. Microscopic observations of fruit bodies of the isolated fungus revealed that zoosporangia had prominent apical papilla and antheridia were formed amphigynously. The optimum temperature for mycelial growth on a medium was at 30 C and the growth was slightly observed even at 35 C. Seedlings, mature fruits and petioles of strawberry, seedlings of egg plant, tomato and green pepper, fruits of egg plant and mature fruits of tomato were highly susceptible to the fungus by artificial inoculation. Fruits of green pepper and cucumber were slightly susceptible whereas seedlings of cucumber, melon, pumpkin and tabacco, and stem of tabacco were not susceptible. Based on these morphological and pathological properties, the fungus was identfied as Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica (Dastur) Waterhouse.
    Download PDF (902K)
  • Masao GOTO, Toshifusa TAKAHASHI, Tokutake OKAJIMA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 185-192
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Twenty-nine cultures of Erwinia milletiae (Kawakami & Yoshida 1920) Magrou 1937 were isolated from galls on Wistaria floribunda DC. which were collected in several areas of the Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. Seven cultures of E. herbicola (Lühnis 1911) Dye 1964 were isolated from the surface of leaves of Citrus spp. and W. floribunda DC. The physiological and pathogenicity characters of these cultures were compared. Cultures of E. milletiae were pathogenic on only 2 plant species out of 48 tested, namely W. floribunda DC. and W. brachybotrys Sieb. & Zucc. on which outgrowths were formed on growing stems 10 to 14 days after inoculation. These outgrowths developed into galls about 5 mm in diameter 1 month after inoculation, 20 to 30 mm 1 year after inoculation and 50 to 60 mm 2 years after inoculation. Gall formation was also induced on the thick roots, crowns, trunks, leaf-petioles, and midribs of leaflets of the plants following wound inoculation. No culture of E. herbicola was pathogenic in any plants tested, although one culture (EH2) induced a confluent necrosis in citrus leaf tissues when inoculated by the infiltration technique. Physiological and biochemical characters of E. herbicola showed that this species is quite heterogeneous since out of 71 tests with seven cultures, 18 gave variable results. In contrast, the cultures of E. milletiae were consistently homogeneous in their physiological and cultural properties, variations being detected in only 3 tests. The characters of E. milletiae were closely similar to those of E. herbicola, falling within the range of diversity of the latter. Therefore, we consider that on the basis of pathogenicity to Wistaria floribunda DC. and W. brachybotrys Sieb. & Zucc., E. milletiae should be classified as a pathovar of E. herbicola under the scientific name of E. herbicola pv. milletiae (Kawakami & Yoshida 1920) nov. comb. Culture EM1 is proposed as the neopathotype strain of the bacterium and has been lodged in Plant Diseases Division Culture Collection, DSIR, Auckland, New Zealand and National Collection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria, Plant Pathology Laboratory, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Harpenden, England.
    Download PDF (1002K)
  • Rinzo Sato, Kenji Kitazawa
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 193-199
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A root rot disease of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) was found at Bibai and Memuro, Hokkaido in 1978. At the roots and base of the stems, diseased plants formed reddish brown lesions, which turned violet brown with the dovelopnent of disease. Symptoms of the tops were characterized by stunting, yellowing, and defoliation. The causal fungus was identified as Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. & Curt.) Wei by the similarity to the description of Ellis. Conidia of this fungus were brown, curved, and broad at the base, formed on conidiophores singly or in chain, and varied in morphology: i. e. clavate, cylindrical, and rarely Y shaped. Mean dimension was 155×15.2μm. Each conidium had 2 to 28 septa and a hilum at the base. Conidiophores averaged 83×7.3μm in dimension, were brown and erect, and formed singly or in group. Each conidiophore had 1 to 7 septa and a pore at the end. No stromata were observed. The basal cells of conidiophores were swollen. Young mycelia were white and fluffy and turned gray with age. They become olive to black or violet in appearance when conidia were produced. The fungus produced yellow or pink pigment in PDA. Growth on PDA occurred from 5 to 30 C with an optimum temperature range from 20 to 25 C. The optimum pH for growth was 5.0, and the range was from 4.0 to 8.0. Moist conditions of soil favored disease developement. The optimum soil temperature for disease development was 15 to 20 C. The fungus survived at least one year in soil. Of 13 plant species in 7 families tested, legminous plants (i. e. soybeans, beans, adzukibeans, cowpeas and alfalfa), and sugar beets were found to be susceptible to the fungus by inoculation experiments.
    Download PDF (856K)
  • Tadaoki INABA, Toshihiko HINO, Toshihiro KAJIWARA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 200-208
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Java corn downy mildew fungus, Peronosclerospora maydis (Racib.) C. G. Shaw [Sclerospora maydis (Racib.) Butl.], was inoculated to seedlings of corn, Zea mays L., at the 2.5-leaf stage and incubated at 25 C-20 C (daytime-night, 12 hr each) for 27days. Systemic symptoms appeared on the 6th-10th leaves of the plant thus treated. For anatomical study, the leaves used were the 8th, 9th and 10th leaves which were at the developing stage and the 11th leaf which had not emerged out of leaf whorl and showed inconspicuous symptoms. As for the 8th-10th leaves, samples were taken from sporulating area, non-sporulating area on lesion and border area between these 2 areas. As for the 11th leaf, no conidia were formed on the whole area and the tip part was sampled. Observations made after sectioning the samples embedded in paraffin revealed the presence of 3 kinds of hypha types, i.e., “crooked type”, “slender type” and “intermediate type”. In the samples taken from the leaf which had not emerged and also from the non-sporulating area, most of hyphae observed were of the slender type, intermingled with a few hyphae of the intermediate type, whereas no crooked type hyphae were found. In the sporulating area, however, most of the hyphae observed were of the crooked type, intermingled with a few hyphae of the intermediate type and very few of the slender type. In the border between these 2 areas, crooked and intermediate type hyphae were mostly observed with a few hyphae of the slender type. From these observations, it was concluded that the hyphae in leaf tissues seem to be of the slender type in non-sporulating areas located in the basal part of leaves at the developing stage as well in non-emerged leaves. These hyphae gradually change to the intermediate type and the crooked type along with the leaf development. After assuming the crooked type, the hyphae seem to be able to produce conidia.
    Download PDF (3265K)
  • Jae Eul CHOI, Nobuaki MATSUYAMA, Satoshi WAKIMOTO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 209-215
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    By means of gel diffusion test with antisera produced against Xanthomonas campestris pv. oryzae isolates Q7472 (pathogenic group I) and Q7502 (pathogenic group IV), three serovars, A, B-I and B-II, were designated in X. campestris pv. oryzae isolates collected from Asian countries. Among 160 isolates tested, 132 produced precipitin bands with both antisera and were designated as serovar A. The other 28 isolates gave bands with anti-Q7502-serum but not with anti-Q7472-serum and were designated as serovar B. Serovar B was further separated into B-I and B-II, in terms of heat tolerance of antigen. Among 28 isolates belonging to serovar B, 20 fell into B-I because they did not show any changes in reaction pattern even if heat treatment (dip into boiling water for 1hr) was given to the antigens. The remaining 8 isolates were designated as B-II as they lost their antigenicity by heating.
    The degree of autoagglutination of isolates in 0.1-10% CaCl2 or 1% acriflavine hydrochloride solution closely related with serovars. Serovar B-I and B-Il showed marked autoagglutination while serovar A did not or much less in degree even if it occurred. The same phenomenon was also observed when heat treatment was given to the isolates suspended in 0.85% NaCl solution.
    Serovar A is distributed all over Asian countries more widely with higher frequency as compared to serovar B.
    Download PDF (1582K)
  • Shigeo NAITO, Toshiya SUGIMOTO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 216-223
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fructifications of an anastomosis group AG 2-2 of Thanatephorus cucumeris on the surface of the petiols of sugar beet plants bearing crown rot lesions and on that of surrounding soil under the oldest leaves of the outer whorls were frequently found in the fields from the later part of June to the middle of September in 1978 and 1979 in Hokkaido. Even in other crops such as corn, wheat and potato, they were sometimes discovered on the surface of the stem, the sheath and the soil under the canopy of the leaves of many plants. No relation was noticed to the kind of plants in the soil heavily infested with AG 2-2. Foliage blight of sugar beets did not occur until the basidiospores were discharged from these fruit bodies. From late July to late August, when the secondary lesions developed and enlarged, many fruit bodies were observed furthermore on the healthy surface adjacent to the lesions in the ventral side of the infected leaves under hot and wet weather conditions. The spore density in the air was closely associated with the number of leaves producing secondary lesions or with the disease severity. In the middle of August, number of spores trapped on an ager plate in the air decreased rapidly with the increase of the distance from the ground, but even at the height of 185cm, 188 spores per 18×18mm2 were caught during a night. At the height of 83cm in a bean field which was located 70m apart from the sugar beet field, 10 spores were recorded. Ninety-eight out of the 99 spore cultures which were obtained in the middle of August by the agar trap in the air in a sugar beet field and a bean field belonged to AG 2-2, and the one left belonged to AG 1. In the early part of September if the temperature was low, in addition to spore dispersal not being observed, primary lesions which were formed before that time were chlorolized in the peripheral area and perforated in the middle without forming the secondary lesions.
    Download PDF (2605K)
  • Tsunekuni MIYAKAWA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 224-230
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In an attempt to find suitable indicator plants for citrus likubin (greening disease occurring in Taiwan) a series of experimental tissue-inoculation tests was made on plants of various citrus species and hybrids and other rutaceous plants grown and maintained in the greenhouse.
    Typical leaf symptoms in citrus were various chlorotic patterns including some resembling zinc deficiency, also blotchy mottle, yellowing, shortening of internodes and stunting (Fig. 1, A-D). In the inoculated seedlings and budlings irregular chlorotic mottle along the veins was produced in 2 or 3 months at 28-32 C, the most favorable temperature conditions for symptom development. At the earlier stage of infection the symptoms tended to appear irregularly in parts of the inoculated plants, then gradually progressed throughout plants, forming shortened internodes, small leaves and sometimes vein corking (Fig. 1, E, F and B). In this series of inoculation tests, however, consistently high rates of infection were obtained by inoculation with 2 or 3 inoculum buds in each seedling or budling (Table 1).
    Among the citrus varieties tested, sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarins (C. reticulata) and Orlando tangelo (C. paradisi×C. reticulata) were found to be highly responsive to the likubin agent and likubin symptoms were clearly defined despite the presence of seedling yellows tristeza virus which is widespread in mandarin citrus trees in Asian countries. In contrast, Eureka lemon (C. limon), sour orange (C. aurantium), grapefruit (C. paradisi), and Sexton tangelo seedlings were much more sensitive to seedling yellows tristeza virus than to the likubin pathogen.
    The blotchy mottle which developed on leaves of inoculated rough lemon (C. jambhiri) was very similar to that of South African greening disease.
    Ponkan (C. reticulata) and Orlando tangelo seedlings showed especially conspicuous leaf symptoms in these tests (Fig. 1, A and Fig. 3). Therefore, it is suggested that these varieties be recommended as indicator plants for likubin, even if the inoculum carries seedling yellows tristeza virus.
    Kumquat varieties (Fortunella spp.) also developed chlorotic and yellowing leaf symptoms typical of likubin. No distinct symptom appeared on trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings; however, sub-inoculated seedlings were found to be infected by topgrafting them with susceptible citrus varieties.
    Murraya (Murraya paniculata), a favorite host plant for Diaphorina citri, the psyllid vector of greening disease, did not show any visible sign of infection following tissue-inoculation.
    Download PDF (2272K)
  • Norio SATO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 231-240
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The role of lesions of potato late blight on foliage and the possibility of lesions on below ground parts as sources of inoculum for the infection of tubers in soil were investigated. Infestation of the surface soil of the ridge by spores deposited from foliage lesions increased markedly within a few days after rain and then decreased rapidly. Tuber blight followed much rain when plants had foliage lesions, but not when foliage lesions were absent due to fungicide spray or death of haulm. If haulm was removed by cutting and the ridge watered much tuber infection occured only if the soil had been inoculated first. Blighted tubers buried in soil a week after inoculation were shown to produce spores. The infectivity of soil surrounding diseased tubers increased rapidly for a few days immediately after they were buried, reached maximum after about a week and then decresed. Increase in tissue resistance of the diseased tubers appeared to be the main reason for the decrease in sporulation. Only a few healthy tubers became diseased even when they were put in direct contact with diseased ones in the soil. It is concluded that tuber infection is more likely from haulm lesions than diseased tubers. Field observations showed that the site of tuber infection in soil was located more often on the bottom rather than the top surface of a tuber.
    Download PDF (519K)
  • Kiroku KOBAYASHI, Tadao UI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 241-246
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A Japanese isolate (A 10) of Cephalosporium gregatum from diseased adzuki bean stem in Hokkaido, Japan and an Iowa isolate (No. 2) from soybean stem in Iowa, U.S.A. were compared in their cultural and morphological characteristics and Gregatins productivities. The cultural and morphological characteristics of both isolates were almost the same and the growth rates at different temperatures and Gregatins productivities were also similar.
    Download PDF (1271K)
  • Naotaka FURUICHI, Kohei TOMIYAMA, Noriyuki DOKE
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 247-249
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (156K)
  • Masayuki NOZUE, Kohei TOMIYAMA, Noriyuki DOKE
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 250-252
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (147K)
  • Kiroku KOBAYASHI, Norio KONDO, Humio TANAKA, Tadao UI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 253-255
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (112K)
  • Kiroku KOBAYASHI, Tadao UI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 256-257
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (88K)
  • Takao KOBAYASHI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 258-262
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (811K)
  • Nobuhiro KITA, Hideyoshi TOYODA, Jiko SHISHIYAMA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 263-265
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (706K)
  • Kenji KITAZAWA, Takahito SUZUI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 267-270
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Verticillium dahliae Klebahn was isolated from various crops in Hokkaido. Most of the Verticillium isolates that had previously been identified as V. albo-atrum Reinke and Berth. or Verticillium sp. by other workers were also reidentified as V. dahliae Klebahn due to presence of microsclerotia, wide host range, possibility of growth at 30 C, and hyaline basal cells of conidiophore.
    Download PDF (665K)
  • Kenji KITAZAWA, Takahito SUZUI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 271-273
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Verticillium dahliae was found to be the cause of Verticillium black-spot disease of radish (Raphanus sativus L.), which has not been described up to this time. Diseased plants exhibited black discoloration of the xylem of the tap root and inconspicuous yellowing of the lower leaves. Inoculation experiments indicated that the fungus was also pathogenic to turnip, egg-plant, strawberry, tomato and cucumber.
    Download PDF (789K)
  • Makoto KOJIMA, Ichiro UYEDA, Tadafumi AOKI, Eishiro SHIKATA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 274-277
    Published: April 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (186K)
feedback
Top