Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 9 , Issue 1
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • Takewo HEMMI, Jûkichi IKEYA
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-15
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1. The present paper deals at first in a detailed way with the results of the morphological studies together with the opinion of the senior author of this paper, that Lenzites tenuis LÉV., Lenzites Earlei MURRILL, Boletus sinuosus SOW., Daedalea gibbosa PERS. and Trametes gibbosa (PERS.) FR. are synonyms given to the same fungus.
    2. The shapes of the orifices of tubes of the present fungus are conspicuously changeable not only on the different individuals, but also on the different portions of the same sporophore. The idea, that the lamellate form seems to be more evoluted than the trametoid and other forms, led the senior author to use the new name Lenzites gibbosa to the present fungus.
    3. In the present paper brief notes on the results of the writers' investigations on this fungus causing wood-rot of various broadleaf trees, with particular reference to the diagnostic characters of decay in the wood as well as to the relation of temperature to its growth, are also given.
    4. The rotted wood becomes soft and light, changing uniformly to whitish color. By such macroscopical changes in wood and also by the cultural experiment using BAVENDAMM's method, the fungus is safely recognized to be one of FALCK's “Korrosionspilze” causing the white spongy rot. The fungus is widely distributed throughout Nippon from Hokkaido to Formosa.
    5. The relation of temperature to the mycelial growth of the fungus was studied by growing it on poured plates of apricot decoction agar, of potato decoction agar and of soy agar, according to SAITO's formula, incubated at different temperatures. From the data of this experiment it was found that the mycelium of this fungus grows very vigorously at 28°C and 32°C and the optimum temperature for its growth seems to lie at a temperature a little higher than 28°C.
    Download PDF (2080K)
  • I. KAWAI
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 16-21
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1) The present paper deals with intracellular bodies associated with the dwarf disease of mulberry trees. The bodies are found either in epidermal cells or in mesophyll cells of the affected leaves.
    2) A single intracellular body is found often in close contact with the nucleus of the host cell, although sometimes two are found in one and the same cell. They are usually oval, round or occasionally irregular in shape, and from 4.5 to 13.5 microns in length and from 4.5 to 6.0 microns in width.
    3) The bodies apparently consist of somewhat homogeneous substance surrounded by an inexplicit membrane, and contain many vacuoles of various sizes.
    4) From this discovery of intracellular bodies in affected leaves, it is beyond doubt that the dwarf disease of mulberry trees is a trouble due to a virus.
    Download PDF (861K)
  • Seito TAKIMOTO
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 22-32
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The bacterial spot of tomato was found causing a considerable loss in the districts devoted to production of tomato in Chosen. Its symptoms were found to be identical with the description given by E. M. DOIDGE, M. W. GARDNER, and J. B. KENDRICK, however, with a greater damage on the pedicels and peduncles. On about April when the plants are still in the seedling stage, this disease first becomes apparent, causing its greatest spread in the months of June and July, especially after rain which follows the sunny days. Greatest loss occured on the soil of relatively low water holding capacity and low in organic matter.
    The writer has found the causal organism to be practically same as the one described by the above mentioned investigators and B. B. HIGGINS, as Bacterium vesicatorium.
    The infection is effected through the stomatal openings and the injured tissues, and rarely uninjured fruits. The organism overwinters in the soil and in the infected leaves, stalks and seeds. Effective control of the disease is obtained by the seed disinfection with 1: 1000 to 1: 3000 solution of mercuric chloride, followed by spraying two or three times with 3-2-75 or 3-2-90 Bordeaux mixture prior to the appearance of the disease.
    Download PDF (1590K)
  • Yoshitaka INOUE
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 33-40
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1. In other papers, the writers divided the pathogenicities of culture-strains of the rice blast fungus, Piricularia Oryzae BR. et CAV., into three classes. According to SATOH (6) and SETO (7), the rice blast fungus is capable of decomposing the cellulose added to the culture media. In the present investigation the writer has intended to compare the degree of such abilities shown by 21 culture-strains of the fungus and also to illustrate the relation. between their pathogenicities and cellulose-decomposing abilities.
    2. The writer cultured those strains on the synthetic agar plates containing colloidal cellulose for two weeks. The cellulose-decom-posing abilities of the strains were compared by means of measuring the width of the clear and semitransparent zones appeared around the developed colonies of the fungus, when iodine-solution was poured on the plates.
    3. As far as the writer's experiment was concerned, the cellulose-decomposing abilities shown by those culture-strains were obviously differentiated. Such strains, as No.3, 9, 10, 12, 15, 20, 21, 29 and 34, showed the most active ability, while those, as No.17, 25 and 32, were the weakest. The other strains were inserted between the above two groups, although there were some variations among them. Such specialization in the cellulose-decomposing abilities of the fungus seemed to be almost parallel to that in their pathogenicities. The strains, which were strong in the pathogenicity, showed generally the active ability in the cellulose-decomposition.
    Download PDF (460K)
  • Seito TAKIMOTO
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 41-43
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A bacterial disease on Cissus japonica WILLD., with black spots on the leaves has been noted. The causal organism is believed to be a heretofore undescribed species, and proposed the name Aplanobacter cissicola n. sp. The description of the bacteria is as follows:
    A non-motile short rod with rounded ends, occurs in single or in pair. Measures 1.0-2.0×0.5-0.9μ, no spore but capsule formed. Gram negative. Colonies on potato extract agar are circular, convex, smooth, and dirty white. Feebly clouded in beef bouillon followed by precipitation of pellicle and rim. Gelatin not liquefied, milk digested without coagulation; good growth in USCHINSKY'S solution with the formation of pellicle, green pigment and increased viscidity. Strict aerobic, nitrate not reduced, nor hydrogen sulphide and indol produces. Starch is not digested, no acid nor gas from sucrose, glucose, lactose and glycerin. Salt toleration 3%. Minimum temprature for growth 10°C, maximum 35°C, optimum 30°C, with the thermal death point of 49-50°C.
    The host is limited to Cissus japonica WILLD., being nonparasitic on other vines.
    Download PDF (573K)
  • H. ASUYAMA
    1939 Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 44-52
    Published: 1939
    Released: April 03, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (593K)
feedback
Top