Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 2 , Issue 6
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • Takuji Abe
    1933 Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 501-512
    Published: April 10, 1933
    Released: March 18, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1. The present paper deals with the results of the writer's exp riments on the relation of air humidity to germination and the effect of low temperature on the vitality of the urediniospores of Puccinia glumaruns, Puccinia triticina and Puccinia Lolii which cause the cereal loss in the vicinity of Kyoto.
    2. Either a saturated atmosphlre or a drop of precipitated moisture was almest ideal for germination of the urediniospores of P. triticina On the contrary those in dry condition kept in 99% relative humidity showed very low germinability, averaging 4.29%. In 95% it is very questionable whether any germination took place.
    3. In the case of P. glumarum, the percentage of the germinated spores in the saturated atmosphare without a film of water was very low as compared with that of the germinated spores sown in water drops. In 99% relative humidity they germinated about 1.5%.
    4. The germinability of the urediniospores of Puccinia Lolii in dry condition kept in the saturated atmosphere was a little lower than that of the spores sown in water drops, but in 99% relative humidity they germinated about 17%.
    5. The results obtained seem to support the opinion of ward, Lauritzen and others that the uredinicspores to germinate in an atmosphere at or near the point of saturation and, therefore, a film of water covering the leaf surface is not essential to infection.
    6. By the microscopical examination at the end of 24 hours, it was learned that water conylenses around the dried spores in 100 and 99% relative humidity, and only after this can gerru-nation take place.
    No such water film, however, was formed in 95 or 90%. Hence the opinion of Beauvérie, Melhus and Durrell and Stock that direct contact with water is essential for germination of the urediniospores seems to be supported by these experiments.
    7. The urediniospores of P. triticina and P. Lolii together with their host-leaves were held in a refrigerator at the constant temperature of-8°to-9°C. A few spores of both the fungi did not lose their vitality even after 44 days, although the former seemed to be more resistant for refrigeration than the latter. A suspension of the urediniospores, of P. Lolii was held and frozen in the same refrigerator for 24 hours. The germin bility of such spores was decreased to ca. 4%.
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  • Hajime Yoshii
    1933 Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 513-519
    Published: April 10, 1933
    Released: March 18, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The causal fungus of the leaf spot disease of Gomphrena globosa was isolated at Fukuoka, and its pathogenicity was proved by inoculation experiments. Infection took place k etc een two and four days after inoculation and sporulation began after a few weeks.
    In morphological and cultural characters, the fungus is much resembling Macrosporium Solani, M. Corotue or M. Porni and produces on the host plant long, tapering, slnder-beahed conidia arising singly at the tips of conidiophores. No attempts were succoedccd to produce conidia by ordinary cultural methods. But, on the hyphae which were cut into small pieces and rendered to dry, were produced conidia in keeping them in the moist chamber for several days. These conidia were quite similar to natural ones.
    The organism is identified morphologically with Alternaria Gomphrenae, Togashi. on the characters of the cultured fungus, however, it is quite different from Togashi's description. Some comparative studies of these points have been tried.
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  • 1933 Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 520-522
    Published: April 10, 1933
    Released: March 18, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (338K)
  • 1933 Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 523-574
    Published: April 10, 1933
    Released: March 18, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (6218K)
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