Japanese Journal of Phytopathology
Online ISSN : 1882-0484
Print ISSN : 0031-9473
ISSN-L : 0031-9473
Volume 46 , Issue 3
Showing 1-23 articles out of 23 articles from the selected issue
  • Takuji KOZAKA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 281-283
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Toshikazu TANI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 284-286
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Toshihiro KAJIWARA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 287-290
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Masao YAMADA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 291-293
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Hisatoshi KAKU
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 294
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Tomonori SHIRAISHI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 295
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Satoshi T. OHKI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 296
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Michiaki IWATA, Yukio SUZUKI, Tetsuro WATANABE, Sadaaki MASE, Yasuharu ...
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 297-306
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    The activities of enzymes including peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, phenylalanine ammonialyase, tyrosine ammonia-lyase or catechol-O-methyltransferase in rice leaves were surveyed to elucidate the mechanism of action of probenazole in connection with the resistant reaction of host plant against rice blast fungus. The activities of enzymes were increased evidently in the treated-inoculated rice leaves with probenazole and rice blast fungus conidia than in the leaves of treated-noninoculated, nontreated-inoculated or nontreated-noninoculated one. The above results seem to be closely correlated with the facilitated formation of a physical barrier in and around the invaded cell, which was observed microscopically.
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  • Kuniomi MATSUMOTO, Yukio SUZUKI, Sadaaki MASE, Tetsuro WATANABE, Yasuh ...
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 307-314
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Plant hormones were tested for their effect on the occurrence of rice blast disease caused by Pyricularia oryzae Cav., using a compatible race and cultivar combination. The degree of disease occurrence, as measured by the number of lesions or by the types of lesions, was suppressed by the treatment with auxins (2, 4-D, NAA, IAA), tryptophan or Ethrel (an ethylene releasing agent), whereas stimulated by the treatment with kinetin or abscisic acid (ABA). Gibberellin also tended to stimulate the occurrence of the disease with considerable elongation of the leaves and sheaths. The suppressive effect of IAA or Ethrel turned into stimulative by the combination with kinetin or ABA and the effect of IAA was also interfered by the combination with the antagonists of auxin. The number of lesions on the leaves treated by kinetin with Ethrel was more numerous than that was treated with kinetin alone. While the number of lesions on the leaves treated by ABA with IAA or Ethrel was fewer than that was treated with ABA alone. The lesions on the leaves were conspicuously of acute type after the treatment with kinetin and were of chronic type after the treatment with ABA. The relationship between plant hormones and resistance of rice plant to the rice blast disease was discussed.
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  • Hiroshi KAMIUNTEN, Satoshi WAKIMOTO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 315-321
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    The physical properties and chemical structures of the filamentous phage Xf2 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. oryzae were clarified. The phage Xf2 was concentrated from enriched phage suspensin by differential centrifugation, purified by CsCl equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation and used for chemical analysis. The phage Xf2 was found to be composed of about 11% DNA and 89% of protein. The base composition of Xf2 DNA was adenine: guanine: cytosine: thymine=22.7:30.4:25.8:21.1, indicating high similarity to that of the X. campestris pv. oryzae phage Xf. Xf2 DNA was characterized as single-stranded one because of its noncomplementary base ratios and melting curve.
    SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proved that Xf2 protein consisted of major and minor proteins. Major coat protein was found to consist of 43 amino acid residues, showing some differences from that of Xf and filamentous coliphages. Histidine, cystine and phenylalanie were absent and the content of hydrophobic amino acids was calculated at 15 molecules per one coat protein. The molecular weight of major coat protein of Xf2 determined by amino acid composition analysis was 4740 daltons, and that of minor coat protein determined by gel electrophoresis was 56, 000 daltons.
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  • Setsuo SHIMIZU
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 322-328
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Liberation of conidia of Pyricularia oryzae Cav. from a newly formed lesion on a leaf or a detached node of rice plant placed in dark box (30×35×60 cm) and sedimentation of the liberated conidia were observed. The box has a slit (4×30 mm) for Tyndall illumination and has a window for observation. The sedimentation path of conidium was photographed by using a motor driving 35 mm-camera or a 8 mm-movie camera under the illumination. Liberation of conidia occurred after maturation of conidia on the lesion under 100% relative humidity and the conidium was observed to sediment singly in the box. Terminal velocity of sedimenting conidium was varying from 4.0 to 8.7 mm/sec in still air. Average value was 6.7 mm/sec by the method using 35 mm-camera and 7.0 mm/sec by the movie method. The value is of the order expected from McCubbin's empirical formula, but less than the one expected from Stoke's formula.
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  • Masao GOTO, Toshihusa TAKAHASHI, Miguel A. MESSINA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 329-338
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri (Hasse 1915) Dye 1978 isolated from citrus canker in Japan (canker A) and those from cancrosis B in Argentina (canker B) were compared by pathological, physiological, serological and phage susceptibility properties. Strains of canker B organism were characterized by being significantly less virulent than those of canker A organism on various citrus plants such as Unshu, Natsudaidai, lemon and navel orange. Strains of canker B organism also differed from those of canker A organism in small size of colonies on agar plates, delayed lag period in liquid media, inability to utilize lactose and maltose, susceptibility to a new phage Cp 3, and lack of an antigenic component of the latter. Ten out of twenty-one strains of canker B organism were unable to utilize malonate which was consistently utilized by strains of canker A organism. All strains of canker B organism utilized mannitol, while one-half of the strains of canker A organism did not utilize this substrate. It was concluded that such differences supported the differentiation of canker B organism as a distinct group within the pathovar of X. campestris pv. citri.
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  • Kouji YOSHIDA, Tadanori GOTO, Masayasu NEMOTO, Tsuneo TSUCHIZAKI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 339-348
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    In 1970-1975, five viruses, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), muskmelon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) and tomato ringspot virus (TomRSV), were isolated from field-grown melon plants in Hokkaido. Identification of the viruses was based on host range, physical properties, vector relationships, particle morphology and serology. The isolate of CMV was found to be serologically related to Y strain of CMV, and to be the most prevalent virus infecting melons in Hokkaido. WMV, which has flexuous filaments about 750nm long, was transmitted by aphids in a non-persistent manner, and its host range was restricted mostly to Cucurbitaceae, Leguminosae and Chenopodiaceae. According to the classification of Webb and Scott, this virus belongs to the WMV-2group. CGMMV which has straight rods 300nm long was not transmitted by aphids, and its host range was restricted to Cucurbitaceae and Chenopodium amaranticolor. The virus reacted with antiserum to watermelon strain, but not with antiserum to cucumber strain of CGMMV. MNSV with isometric particles 25 to 30nm in diameter, had a host range restricted to Cucurbitaceae. The virus was soil-borne, but not transmitted through seeds of melon. Olpidium sp. was found constantly to present in roots of plants naturally infected with MNSV. In the greenhouse, almost all of the melon plants grown on the soil infested with MNSV were symptomless. However, when leaves of these symptomless plants were rubbed with gauze, necrotic local lesion appeared on the rubbed surface. Mass of virus particles and/or multivesicular structure were observed in cells of parenchyma tissue adjacent to vessel, when thin sections of the necrotic local lesion induced by mechanical abrasion of the leaves were observed under an electron microscope. TomRSV, isolated for the first time from melons, showed isometric particles about 25nm in diameter and has a wide host range. This virus was transmitted through seeds of soybean, but not through seeds of melon. The virus reacted with antiserum to TomRSV.
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  • Kouji YOSHIDA, Tadanori GOTO, Masayasu NEMOTO, Tsuneo TSUCHIZAKI
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 349-356
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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    Squash mosaic virus (SMV) was isolated from a melon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus) showing mosaic symptoms in Yuhbari, Hokkaido. The host range was limited to Cucurbitaceae, except for Pisum sativum and Lathyrus odoratus, among 41 plant species belonging to 10 families tested. The virus was not transmitted by the aphids, Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii, but transmitted by the chrysomelid beetles, Aulacophora femoralis and Atranchya menetriesi, and coccinelled beetles, Epilachna admirabilis and E. sparsaorientalis. When the insects, A. femoralis and E. sparsaorientalis, were transferred daily to healthy melon plants, they remained infective for 16 days and 4 days, respectively. The percentage of transmission through seeds of melons, cv. Yuhbari King, Earl's Favourite, Honeydew, Spicy, and Prince, and pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima), were 13.5%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 15.3%, 10.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. No seed transmission occurred in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), cucumber, and watermelon. Infectivity of crude sap from infected melons was lost by heating at 65-70C for 10minutes, by diluting 2×10-5-10-5, and by aging at 20 C for 12 days. The virus was isometric particles of 25 to 30nm in diameter. In ultrathin sections of the virus-infected melon leaves, the virus particles were observed in the vacuoles of spongy parenchyma cells and palisade parenchyma cells. The tubular structures were observed in the cytoplasm of spongy parenchyma cells and palisade parenchyma cells. The titer of antiserum to the virus was 1: 1600 in the ring interface tests. The antiserum reacted with four isolates of SMV from Hokkaido and an isolate from Okayama, but not with cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and muskmelon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) in gel diffusion test. From the results, the virus was identified as a strain that belongs to group I of squash mosaic virus.
    Within 72 samples of diseased melons showing mosaic symptoms, collected in the fields of Hokkaido from 1970 to 1975, 6 different viruses were recovered. They are 47 of CMV, 11 of watermelon mosaic virus, 5 of SMV, 3 of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, 5 of MNSV, and 1 of tomato ringspot virus.
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  • Keiko T. NATSUAKI, Shuichi YAMASHITA, Yoji DOI, Kiyoshi YORA
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 357-360
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • Setsu MIYAMOTO, Yuichi MIYAMOTO
    1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 361-363
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 364-373
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 373-382
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 382-391
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 391-400
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 400-409
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 409-418
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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  • 1980 Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 418-428
    Published: July 25, 1980
    Released: February 19, 2009
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