Internal Medicine
Online ISSN : 1349-7235
Print ISSN : 0918-2918
ISSN-L : 0918-2918
Volume 45 , Issue 22
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
EDITORIALS
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
  • Satsuki Kawasaki, Osamu Hasegawa, Shinobu Satoh, Tatsuya Saito, Haruko ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1267-1271
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Objective: To examine factors that affect the development of retinopathy after short-term inpatient management of diabetes.
    Patients and Methods: The subjects were 143 patients with type 2 diabetes who were admitted for inpatient management of diabetes, and did not have retinopathy of the right eye at admission, and had an HbA1c level of ≥8.0%. We studied the characteristics of patients who developed retinopathy within one year after discharge.
    Results: Between the admission date and one year after discharge, twenty-six patients developed retinopathy and the retinopathy subsequently regressed in 5 patients. The 26 patients who developed retinopathy had a significantly longer duration of diabetes (p<0.005), had a higher fasting blood glucose level at admission (p=0.06), and received insulin therapy during the admission at a higher rate (p=0.06) than the 117 patients without retinopathy. The magnitude of the reduction in HbA1c level at 3 months after discharge was smaller in the 13 patients who developed retinopathy within 3 months after discharge than in the 130 patients who did not. Among the 26 patients who developed retinopathy, the HbA1c level at one year after discharge of the 5 patients whose retinopathy regressed was lower than that of the 21 patients whose retinopathy did not regress (p=0.06).
    Conclusions: A long duration of diabetes, high fasting blood glucose level at admission, and treatment with insulin were associated with the development of retinopathy. Patients with these characteristics should undergo frequent fundus examinations after correction of hyperglycemia. The retinopathy was likely to improve if patients maintained strict glycemic control after discharge.
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  • Akiko Noda, Shigeru Nakai, Taro Soga, Tatsuki Sugiura, Norihisa Iwayam ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1273-1278
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Objective: Sleep disturbance and the use of hypnotic medications are common in patients on hemodialysis. Factors that contribute to sleep disturbance and the use of hypnotic medications in hemodialysis patients were investigated.
    Methods: With the use of a questionnaire-based survey, we examined the prevalence of symptoms that reflect sleep disorders such as insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), and snoring and use of hypnotic medications in 252 hemodialysis patients.
    Results: The overall prevalence of insomnia was 59.1%, with the prevalence of difficulty in initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS), and early morning awakening (EMA) being 47.6, 24.2, and 28.2%, respectively. Daytime sleepiness and habitual snoring were reported by 42.5 and 33.7%, respectively. The prevalence of routine use of hypnotic drugs was 25.8%. Both RLS and age were significantly associated with insomnia [odds ratio (OR), 3.75; p 0.001, OR, 1.03; p < 0.01]. RLS was a significant factor for DIS, DMS, and EMA (OR, 2.26; p < 0.05, OR, 3.44; p < 0.0005, OR, 4.25; p < 0.0005) and age was a significant factor for DMS and EMA (OR, 1.03; p = 0.053, OR, 1.05; p < 0.005). Both insomnia and snoring were associated with the use of hypnotic drugs (OR, 2.97; p < 0.001, 1.59; p=0.13).
    Conclusion: Both RLS and sleep-disordered breathing may contribute to sleep disturbance in hemodialysis patients. RLS in particular may be an important factor in insomnia, which in turn is likely responsible for the high prevalence of hypnotic drug use in hemodialysis patients.
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  • Kyoko Nomura, Mutsuhiro Nakao, Mikiya Sato, Eiji Yano
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1279-1283
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Objective: To investigate 1) the patterns of regular prescriptions for benzodiazepines among department clinics in a university teaching hospital, 2) the effects of patient's characteristics on regular benzodiazepine prescriptions, and 3) the patterns of benzodiazepine prescriptions among department clinics from the perspective of pharmacological half-life.
    Patients: Patients were 22,099 outpatients (51% female; mean age: 56 years) who were prescribed any drug three or more times.
    Methods: Cross-sectional study of patient-based data (July 2002 to August 2003) from the database of a computer ordering system at a university hospital. The patterns of regular prescriptions for benzodiazepines were compared among the clinical departments (i.e., Internal Medicine, Psychiatry, and Others). A logistic regression model was used to assess the effects of patient gender and age, and the clinic visited on the issuing of regular prescriptions for benzodiazepines.
    Results: Regular benzodiazepine users were 3,204 (14.5%). Benzodiazepines were more likely to be prescribed for women (61.3%) than for men and were prescribed most often by psychiatrists (31.7%), followed by internists (20.1%). Multivairate logistic regression model showed that being female and elderly, and being prescribed by a psychiatrist were significantly associated with regular benzodiazepine prescriptions. With regard to the pharmacological half-life, internists were more likely to prescribe short half-life benzodiazepines than were psychiatrists (p < 0.001).
    Conclusion: A large number of outpatients at a Japanese university hospital appeared to be maintained on a regular supply of benzodiazepine drugs. Educational programs are needed to promote the rational prescribing of benzodiazepines.
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CASE REPORTS
  • Aki Tomihara, Naoto Ashizawa, Kuniko Abe, Naoe Kinoshita, Keisuke Chih ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1285-1289
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A 24-year-old pregnant woman with Marfans syndrome delivered by cesarean section during the 38th week of gestation. Although aortic root dilatation did not increase during pregnancy, three months after delivery, the patient noticed a pulsatile abdominal mass. Aortic aneurysm was diagnosed and surgical replacement of the infrarenal abdominal aorta to the common iliac arteries and reconstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery were performed. Moreover, the patient subsequently developed a Stanford type B thoracic aortic dissection, even after more than four months of β-blockade.
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  • Yasunori Iwata, Takashi Wada, Akio Uchiyama, Atsuo Miwa, Izaya Nakaya, ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1291-1295
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
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    We report a case with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, showing IgA deposition which disappeared after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).
    In 1996, a 28-year-old man was diagnosed with IgA nephropathy by renal biopsy. Steroid therapy improved proteinuria from 3 g/day to 1 g/day. In 2003, he received PBSCT following the initial therapy for ALL. After complete remission, urinary protein and hematuria remained at between (-) and (±). In 2004, the second renal biopsy specimen revealed no deposit of IgA or C3. These findings suggested that immune reconstruction with PBSCT following immunosuppression therapy was of benefit to IgA nephropathy.
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  • Yoko Uchiyama-Tanaka, Yasukiyo Mori
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1297-1302
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
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    A 69-year-old man with a 10-year history of diabetes mellitus and 1-year history of steroid treatment for nonspecific interstitial pneumonia presented with a nightly fever of over 39°C after surgery for a false abdominal aortic aneurysm. Hypercalcemia was detected, despite acute renal dysfunction. There was no laboratory evidence of collagen disease or infection including tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based amplification of DNA from a bone marrow biopsy specimen revealed Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antituberculous chemotherapy was initiated. Early bone marrow biopsy and the use of new techniques such as PCR can avoid delay in initiating the proper treatment for compromised patients.
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  • Kaori Okayasu, Yuichiro Takeda, Jun Kojima, Atsuto Yoshizawa, Nobuyuki ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1303-1307
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A 44-year-old man was treated with amiodarone for dilated cardiomyopathy. After 53 months, he developed amiodarone-induced interstitial pneumonia. Amiodarone treatment was terminated, and the patient was given corticosteroids. These treatments were effective. However, pneumonitis recurred whenever prednisolone was reduced to less than 5 mg per day. Considering the patient's background characteristics, we considered his body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and found his to be high. When four additional patients with amiodarone pulmonary toxicity were reviewed at our institute, a correlation between BMI and the duration of shadow disappearance was found (R2=0.8695). Because amiodarone is lipophilic, the patient's high BMI might have influenced the repeated appearance of pulmonary toxicity.
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  • Hiroshi Kawabata, Toshioki Sawaki, Takafumi Kawanami, Kumiko Shimoyama ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1309-1314
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
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    Three cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) complicated with inflammatory intestinal ulcers all had cytogenetic abnormalities with trisomy 8. The first two patients were diagnosed with intestinal Behçets disease and were successfully treated with salazosulphapiridine, and the third patient died after leukemic transformation. We review the reported cases of MDS complicated with Behçets disease. Most of these cases are Japanese, having intestinal involvement as well as cytogenetic abnormalities with trisomy 8. We discuss the significance of trisomy 8 in intestinal involvement in MDS.
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  • Taiji Tsunemi, Yuki Sakai, Koichi Tsunoda, Yasuhiro Irie, Yoshiaki Wad ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1315-1317
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    The patient was hospitalized due to rapidly undulant fever and sore throat. Empirical antibiotic therapy was started, however, headache also occurred. Lumbar puncture disclosed polynuclear leukocyte-predominant pleocytosis indicating that the patient suffered from bacterial meningitis. The antibiotics therapy was increased, however, consciousness became impaired and erythema multiforme-like skin lesions appeared. T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity in the brainstem. HLA testing revealed B54 and Cw1. The patient presented futures of Behçets disease at the same time as those of Sweets syndrome and it was difficult to distinguish between the two diseases. Administration of prednisolone showed remarkable effect.
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  • Yusuke Yakushiji, Yoshinori Haraguchi, Shu Soejima, Yukinori Takase, A ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1319-1322
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    We describe a rare case of spontaneous middle cerebral artery (MCA) dissection that caused cerebral infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which also presented with a hyperdense artery sign. A hyperdense artery sign of the MCA in acute cerebral infarction strongly indicates thromboembolic MCA occlusion, which is often treated with thrombolytic therapy. However, thrombolytic therapy for intracranial artery dissections has both risks and benefits, due to the association of artery dissections with SAH. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that an MCA dissection can also cause cerebral infarction with a hyperdense artery sign, particularly in young patients presenting with headache.
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  • Masafumi Seki, Naruhiko Ikari, Seigo Yamamoto, Yuhki Yamagata, Kosuke ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1323-1326
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A 77 years old woman who had a bite with eschar on her left arm, was admitted to emergency ward in our hospital, because of high fever, severe malaise, skin eruption, and consciousness disturbance beginning 5 days previously. She was diagnosed as Japanese spotted fever by seropositive of Rickettsia japonica (R. japonica) antibody, and successfully treated with fluoroquinolone, after minocycline hydrochloride had been proven ineffective. R. japonica-specific DNA was detected by PCR from the tick: Haemaphysalis hystricis larvae collected from a mountainous location in Fukuoka, Japan where the patient had been bitten.
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  • Nobuyuki Toshikuni, Kazuhiro Ujike, Toshihiro Yanagawa, Tatsuhito Suga ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1327-1332
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A 69-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of hepatic failure after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection and fungemia due to Candida albicans associated with decompensated liver cirrhosis and renal failure was made. Bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis developed during hospitalization. Candidemia, endophthalmitis and hepatorenal failure improved with intensive therapy. After discharge, endophthalmitis of the left eye relapsed and vitrectomy was performed. Clinicians should be aware that fungemia complicated by endophthalmitis can be caused by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There might be a risk of such complications among patients with liver cirrhosis in an immunocompromised state.
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  • Makoto Furugen, Shin Yamashiro, Maki Tamayose, Yui Naha, Kazuya Miyagi ...
    2006 Volume 45 Issue 22 Pages 1333-1336
    Published: 2006
    Released: December 15, 2006
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a history of fever, headache and disorientation. His cerebrospinal fluid revealed eosinophilia and his serum had an antibody against Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis). Then, he was diagnosed as eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis. He was treated with repeated lumbar punctures and oral prednisolone. Although a symptom he had been suffering from at the time of his admission was urinary retention, this symptom disappeared as his general condition improved. Therefore his case was considered to be Elsberg syndrome with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by A. cantonensis.
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