Japanese Journal of Health and Human Ecology
Online ISSN : 1882-868X
Print ISSN : 0368-9395
ISSN-L : 0368-9395
Volume 23 , Issue 1
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Tomohiko Koya
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 1-11,A1
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This article contributes to the information of sterilization and induced abortion which are very prevalent and represent important factors of the precipitous decrease of the birth rate in the present Japan. The author made adetailed investigation on the motivation, reason, and the result ; one of the most interesting findings was that the women, generally speaking, used to resort to the sterilization operation under the condition of their having one ortwo male children already. Another finding must also be of value, that whenwomen resort to induced abortion, the next baby will come to them very soon. For this reason, the author wants to emphasize that “ it is not clever” to take the induced abortion for the purpose of birth control, not to say the other disadvantages.
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  • Takako Arakawa
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 12-20,A1
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In an endeavor directed to a wider and higher synthesis of biological, medi cal! and social factors in dealing with the public health problem, the authoress investigated the demographic phenomena as diagnostic indices of the public health condition in Ibaraki Prefecture. The result is summarized as follws :
    1. In the first chapter, demographic data of the census in 1950 were handled and an abridged life table for Ibaraki Prefecture was made out.
    2. In the second chapter, the authoress traced the movement of population and the change with age of the principal causes of death in Ibaraki Prefecture.
    3. In the third chapter the authoress she studied socio-biologically the population groups in urban as well as rural districts in Ibaraki Prefecture. She concluded that the increase of a capacity of population in 'rural parLs of this prefecture had attained the utmost limit, and a balance of population had naturally to be kept by the increase in movement of population to urban districts.
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  • Takako Arakawa
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 21-27,A1
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In an endeavor directed to a wider and higher synthesis of biological, medical! and social factors in dealing with the public health problem, the authoress investigated the demographic phenomena as diagnostic indices of the public health condition in Ibaraki Prefecture. The result is summarized as follws :
    1. In the first chapter, demographic data of the census in 1950 were handled and an abridged life table for Ibaraki Prefecture was made out.
    2. In the second chapter, the authoress traced the movement of population and the change with age of the principal causes of death in Ibaraki Prefecture.
    3. In the third chapter the authoress she studied socio-biologically the population groups in urban as well as rural districts in Ibaraki Prefecture. She concluded that the increase of a capacity of population in 'rural parLs of this prefecture had attained the utmost limit, and a balance of population had naturally to be kept by the increase in movement of population to urban districts.
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  • Takako Arakawa
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 28-38,A1
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In an endeavor directed to a wider and higher synthesis of biological, medicall and social factors in dealing with the public health problem, the authoress investigated the demographic phenomena as diagnostic indices of the public health condition in Ibaraki Prefecture. The result is summarized as follws:
    1. In the first chapter, demographic data of the census in 1950 were handled and an abridged life table for Ibaraki Prefecture was made out.
    2. In the second chapter, the authoress traced the movement of population and the change with age of the principal causes of death in Ibaraki Prefecture.
    3. In the third chapter the authoress she studied socio-biologically the population groups in urban as well as rural districts in Ibaraki Prefecture. She concluded that the increase of a capacity of population in 'rural parLs of this prefecture had attained the utmost limit, and a balance of population had naturally to be kept by the increase in movement of population to urban districts.
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  • Mitio Ikai, Junko Yamakawa
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 39-43,A2
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The pulse rate test is a useful method to check circulatory-respiratory fitness. A quick recovery of the pulse rate to the standing normal is one characteristic of fitness. It is pointed out however, that the pulse rate must be counted immediately since the rates fall rapidly especially in the trained,
    Boas recorded some years ago, with cardiotachometer, heart rate of boys in each fifteen seconds interval during and after exhausting exercises.
    The author closely followed up the heart rate of healthy women with a cardiotachograph during and after 50-100 meters sprint running. Action current of the heart was led from the subject by two electrodes attached to the chest. The amplified current of R-wave of ECG operated Thyratron relay system and a electromagnetic oscillogra. ph. The signals of start and finish of the running were marked on the record of the heart rate.
    It was found that if the time constant of the amplifier for ECG was reduced to 0.05 second, the effect of skeletal muscle activity was negligible. The wires connecting the subject with the cardiotachograph were 50 meters long, giving the subject free running on the straight course on the track.
    The heart rate increased, as well known, rapidly from the beginning of running and reached the maximum rate at the finish of the sprint running. It was noted that respiratory arrhythmia disappeared as the heart rate increased during and after the running. Although the initial drop in the heart rate after the end of running was rapid, it was possible to know the nearest value of the maximum rate in the running by counting the rate in five seconds just after completion of the running. In the study of recovery course, it was useful to count the pulse rate every fifteen seconds after the end of running.
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  • Haruo Mizushima
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 44-51,A2
    Published: 1956
    Released: December 22, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The first life table in Japan was constructed by using the data for l891-98. Since then seven complete life tables were constructed at irregular intervals; and since 1949 abridged life tables were published annually.
    By using these life tables a generation life table was computed by the following procedure:
    It was assumed that 100, 000 babies were born simultaneously at the beginning of 1891 and exposed to the infant mortality (q0) shown in the first life table; when they became one year old in the next calendar year, they were exposed to q1 in that life table, and so on : When they became 8 years old in 1899 they were exposed to q8 in the second life table for 1899-1903, and so on.
    For the blank calendar years for which no life tables were constructed, the mortality rates required were estimated by weighted means derived from tables for preceding and following calendar years, more emphasis being laid on the nearer one.
    By this procedure lx, dx, qx, px could be computed till the age 65. As there are a considerable number of persons who were born in 1891 and have attained the age 65 this year (1956) still living today, ex can not be computed. But if it is assumed that the persons 65 years old today would have the same expectation of life in the future as e65 shown in 1955 life table (this assumption seems not very absurd), then ex of the generation life table for the people born in 1891 can be computed. This assumption was adopted in this life table.
    The result is shown in Table and Graphs in the text.
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  • H Katsunuma
    1956 Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 52-54,A3
    Published: 1956
    Released: November 19, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Division of Health Care and Nursing was established at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo in 1953, for the 'purpose of educating prospective nurses and multi-purpose health workers who have enough understanding and knowledge of medicine and public health, to be able to work in the field of nursing and public health for the sake of individuals and communities.
    The Curriculum of this division is composed of two parts, namely, the course of general education for biology and the course of specialization for health care and nursing.
    The former comprises cultural sciences, social sciences, natural sciences, foreign languages, and physical education, 1500 hours being assigned to this part.
    The latter part is given for the purpose of specialization after passing through the former. About 2500 hours are scheduled for this part:
    Public Health is taught in the course of the specializatipp, The speci* gravity, of Public Health is 19% of the total credit hours including, general education, and about 30%, of the professional subjects,
    The of the specialized subjects consist of basic meclicine, clincai metdiine, nursing arts, and clinical nursing. c
    The breakdown of the public health study is as follows:
    Lectures 240. hours
    Laboratory. practice 225 hours
    Field practice 225; hours
    Seminar 90 hours
    780 tours
    The contents of the public health studies carried out follow:
    1. Public Health (General Part)
    (1) Human Ecology
    Biota-biotop System
    Autoecology
    Synecology
    Structure of Population
    Analysis of Environmental Physiology
    (a) Homesotasis
    (b) Maximum Permissible Limit
    (c) Physical, and chemical Environment.
    Biological Environment
    Social Environment
    (d) Genetics and Nutrition
    (2) Statistical, Reasoning,
    (3) Epidemiology
    (a) Principles of Epidemiology,
    (b) Descriptive, Epidemiology
    Theoretical Epidemiology,
    Field, Epidemiology
    (4) Sanitation.
    (a) Environmental Sanitation
    (b) Food and Milk Sanitation
    (5) Medical Technology
    (6) Social Technology
    II. Public Health (Special, Part)
    (1) Public Health Methodology
    (a) Health Education
    (b) Health Administration
    (c) Health Service
    (2) Community Health Practice
    Urban Health
    Rural Health
    School Health
    Occupational Health
    (3) Research and Seminar.
    (1) Field epidemiological survey
    (2) Field study on intestinal parasites control
    (3) Intoxications chemical due to methaemoglobin formation
    (4) Care of premature infants
    (5) Technic of computation and calculation
    (6) Morphinism and other addictions
    (7) Eugenic counseling
    (8) Leprosy control
    (9) Tuberculosis control etc.
    The background philosophy of the curriculum was established on the following basis.
    (1) All the medical and health activities must be performed on the basis of public health in a wide sense ; accordingly all the medical and health personnel must by all means be public-health minded, so that the students who will later participate in these activities should obtain an adequate knowledge and comprehension of public health during their university education.
    (2) Either in a world-wide sense, or in a domestic sense especially, the most important philosophy of medical and health activity is to be communitydirected and patient centered.
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