Japanese Journal of Health and Human Ecology
Online ISSN : 1882-868X
Print ISSN : 0368-9395
ISSN-L : 0368-9395
Volume 82 , Issue 1
Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
Foreword
Original Articles
  • Keiko SAKAKIBARA Seki, Hirono ISHIKAWA, Takahiro KIUCHI
    2016 Volume 82 Issue 1 Pages 3-19
    Published: January 31, 2016
    Released: February 29, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Objective: The present study revealed mentoring relationship at work and association of mentor support with mentee job satisfaction and mental health.
    Methods: A web-based survey was administered to 2,028 managers and staff within large corporations; 1,283 responses (63.9%) were obtained, and 1,178 responses with full data were analyzed. Multiple regression analyses assessed the association between the amount of mentor support and mentee job satisfaction and mental health.
    Results: Male and female mentees receive support from multiple mentors within and outside of their organization. Male mentees receiving high career, psychosocial, and role-modeling support from mentors within the same organization showed greater job satisfaction and better mental health than non-mentees. Female mentees receiving low career support, as well as high/low psychological and role-modeling support from mentors within the same organization showed greater job satisfaction than non-mentees; however, no significant differences emerged regarding mental health for female mentees.
    Conclusions: Results revealed that mentors within the same organization are particularly important for maintaining and improving job satisfaction among male and female mentees as well as mental health for male mentees. However, some gender differences did emerge suggesting nuances regarding mentor support outcomes for men and women.
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  • Midori NISHIYAMA, Erina SUZUKI, Michiyo HASHIMOTO, Nobuko TAKAOKA, Mic ...
    2016 Volume 82 Issue 1 Pages 20-29
    Published: January 31, 2016
    Released: February 29, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The aim of this 3-month cohort study was to examine the association between low sense of coherence (SOC) and poor subjective well-being of new medical students at a university. Participants were first-year students at Dokkyo Medical University (111 students in 2011, 107 in 2012, and 118 in 2013) who completed self-report questionnaires comprising 29 SOC items and 12 lifestyle items upon entry in April and again in July. Total SOC scores for April (131.8) and July (130.8) were almost unchanged, although meaningfulness and manageability scores decreased significantly and comprehensibility scores increased significantly. Mean scores of total SOC, manageability, and comprehensibility of students whose subjective well-being was good in April but poor in July were significantly lower than those of students whose subjective well-being was good in both months, whereas the mean score of meaningfulness of students with poor subjective well-being in both months was significantly lower than that of students whose subjective well-being was poor in April but good in July.Odds ratios for poor subjective well-being adjusted for age, sex, and year of admission were significantly high for low comprehensibility (4.33: 1.35-13.9) and low manageability (8.51: 1.90-38.1).Thus, our study suggested that the SOC of new medical students can be used to identify those students at risk of poor QOL.
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