The Bulletin of Japanese Curriculum Research and Development
Online ISSN : 2424-1784
Print ISSN : 0288-0334
ISSN-L : 0288-0334
Volume 22 , Issue 4
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • Toshikazu YAMAMOTO, Jun MORIYAMA, Reizo AOKI, Ryoya MAKINO
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 1-8
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A teaching tool was developed to enhance the learning of A.C. and D.C. visually which are parts of the study items in the electricity domains of the Science and the Industrial Arts and Home Making Courses in Junior High School, and its teaching effect was investigated. The teaching tool developed was constructed by using the following setup: two light emitted diodes (LEDs) are attached to the disk with each polarity reversed mutually and the difference between A.C. and D.C. can be learned by how their emitted lights are observed under the constant rotating speed of the disk. In the case where D.C. voltage is inflicted, one of their sides is only illuminated and therefore their lights are observed with a continuous ring. In case the A.C. voltage is inflicted, each one is observed with on-and-off ring. Moreover, the on-and-off lights can be observed in the stationary state by controlling the disk rotating speed to be proper one in the case of A.C. voltage. Therefore, the lesson is possible to use for finding the A.C. frequency by the number of lights emitted and the number of rotations of the disk. By comparing the results of trial lesson using this tool and the former one, it became clear that the students could observe and recognize the illumination state of LEDs more correctly by using this tool, and the stability of learned contents about A.C. frequency became higher.
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  • Takemori MOTOMURA, Seij UCHIOKE
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 9-18
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to inspect the effectiveness of Fuzzy analysis. With that purpose, we evaluated the Informatic education as general education at Junior high school, Senior high school and University levels. We engaged ourselves to a study using various analyses such as Factor analysis, Cluster analysis, Correlation analysis and to interpret the research data as before. This study established evaluation items considered to be the learning person side from both of leader side and examined class evaluation by a teacher simultaneously. As a result, I understood the following things by using Fuzzy analysis that include Fuzzy measure, Membership function, and Fuzzy integral. We understood as a result that the emotion domain consisting of "interest, concern, desire and manner" and "scholarship fixing" were related substantially to the curriculum and contents of Information Literacy. The evaluation of Information Education added a level of a school and contents of another subject taken from a point of view of Information Science (knowledge, understanding), Administration of Information (emotion), Information practical use (technical skill) which are indispensable in introducing Literacy. These agree with evaluation item provided by the former study on this aspect.
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  • Kengo MAEDA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 19-25
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to clarify the scientific abilities of pupils that are expected or required in science teaching by students aspiring to be a teacher. The 46 scientific abilities in a questionnaire were made based on the behavioral objectives of science presented by Klopfer, and the needs of the students were asked by using a rating scale ranging from one to five. The students were asked about their teaching attitudes such as instructors and supporters too. The results suggested that the students expected the pupils to acquire the scientific abilities beforehand, in particular, the scientist-like attitude and the basic experimental skill that corresponded to the first and second factors abstracted using the principal component analysis, respectively. The five interpretable factors were obtained. The prerequisite scientific abilities of pupils were also discussed from the viewpoints of the degree of experience in practice teaching and the degree of learning in science, because these two criteria were found to affect clearly the student's ideas about the teaching attitude.
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  • Kumiko TSUKAHARA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 27-36
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    According to the prior investigation made before this research, the students of this school have the wish of becoming elated with mathematics despite of their attitude to dislike it. Moreover, the students have the exact recognition and the expectation about the value of mathematical view and mathematical thinking. This paper proposed introducing the history of mathematics into lessons as a method for attaining the aim of learning mathematics in a high school to reach this expectation. Consequently, the comparison of the class which introduced the history of mathematics, and the class which did not introduce the history of mathematics looked at the clear difference in the recognition about the value of mathematical view and mathematical thinking. That is, in the following point, deepening of students' consciousness was seen by introducing the history of mathematics. It is a fact that the mathematical view and mathematical thinking were more important than memorizing, or using the solution method of problems in learning mathematics.
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  • Yuuji MIZUI
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 37-46
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this study, I firstly reviewed studies on preventive factors in solving story problems that were examined. Secondly, I investigated some possible impeding task factors on solving Nonroutine Story Problems on Speed (NSPS). The two main factors clarified so far include task factors and problem solver's factors. The former factors are divided into context factors, structure factors and syntax factors, and the latter factors are classified into cognitive factors, metacognitive factors and beliefs/emotional factors. It is likely that the difference in speed treated in a story (i.e. rate = distance / time, rate = water volume / time), the difference in placed situation (i.e. overtake, encounter), and the difference in condition (i.e. distance or water volume, time) are hindering task factors of NSPS.
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  • Yoshifumi MIKUMA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 47-54
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study presents a historical perspective on speech communication activities in the extracurricular English-learning student body of Japanese schools, called the English Speaking Society (E.S.S.), where they use such forensic activities as speech, debate and drama as a means of studying English. The E.S.S. boasts of 120 years of history, providing English students whose learning backgrounds are in the traditional "lockstep" classroom with opportunities to test their knowledge and fine-tune it through use. In my previous research, I have pointed out the "social-constructivist" nature of the E.S.S. speech activities, which necessitate students to engage in "legitimate peripheral participation." In this paper, I argue that through the use of speech, the E.S.S. has historically been serving as a social interface for the English learners. This interface allows student's linguistic knowledge to be used to talk about what happens both outside and within the learner, outside and within the classroom, thereby allowing understanding of the idea of functioning "socially". This social function, I contend, is the phase of education that has been predominantly absent from the standard curriculum and left in the hands of the learners.
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  • Tomoko YOSHIKAWA, Noriok ARAI
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 55-63
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A lesson plan in "General Home Economics" in the upper secondary school level was developed and practiced with the intention to stimulate students' interest in dwelling with the environment and foster their ability and willingness to take part in the process of decision making and implementation to initiate change. In this report, the evaluation of the lesson plan was made by means of analyzing students' answering sheets and writings. The observable effects were as follows: 1. Ninety-seven percent of the students replied that the study was interesting, and the plan were evaluated with high acceptability. 2. The students seemed to learn most intensively while planning, drawing and making models of school rooms and public facilities such as stations, parks and shopping centers. 3. By taking part in actual lessons based on the lesson plan, the students' positive attitude toward studying dwelling environment issues and what they could do about them increased. These results lead to the conclusion that the theme, topics and ways of learning of this lesson plan were affirmatively accepted by students and the certain effectiveness of the lesson plan for the purpose of the study became evident.
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  • Hiroshi SUGA
    Type: Article
    2000 Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 65-74
    Published: March 31, 2000
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to examine the beliefs of a music teacher by making a phenomenological investigation into the structure of his beliefs, and the effects that they have on students and the flow of classes. In this study, the music class conducted by Hiroshi Yamamoto at Fukushima University Affiliated Elementary School was analyzed based on participant observation and a post‐class interview with him as a teacher. This analysis made clear that the structure of his beliefs was as follows: 1) he attempts to broaden the children's musical values by letting them experience music as a network of expression, 2) he consistently takes the position of being a kind of impromptu supporter, and 3) he emphasizes making a place of musical communication of the music class. The structure of this belief system is consistent as a whole, and as a result of the stable management noted in these beliefs, the children developed to the point that they were able to organize ensemble activity by themselves, and to positively express themselves through an informal concert during the noon recess at school. At the same time, it became clear that the respondent has struggled with internal conflict between his role as a supervisor and his role as a music teacher. The future task is to clarify the improvement process by which a music teacher can overcome such conflicts in forming a strong belief system.
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