The Bulletin of Japanese Curriculum Research and Development
Online ISSN : 2424-1784
Print ISSN : 0288-0334
ISSN-L : 0288-0334
Volume 34 , Issue 3
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • Toru TATTA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 1-10
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study examines the modern-day significance and potential of the double-objective organizational theory of Japanese language teaching, focusing on the "double-objective structuring theory" and "two-fold curriculum-integrated teaching unit theory." Here we elucidates the development of learning topics in Japanese classes is important not only for children's self-learning but also for their self-evaluation. Moreover, it suggests that the existing double-objective argument has not adequately explored the link between students and their linguistic competence. Thus, this study indicates that encouraging students through evaluative activities to think about the nature and value of verbal learning fosters their self-evaluation abilities as well as establishes innovative and creative Japanese lessons. Further, by assessing the double-objective organizational theory on learning evaluation, this study discusses the challenges and prospects of stimulating self-evaluation abilities for learning significance in Japanese language lessons.
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  • Akiko SUZUKI, Shigeko SHOYAMA, Kazunami MINE, Takaya KOUYAMA, Hidetosh ...
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 11-20
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The objects of this study are to clarify Japanese elementary school students' cognition about craft education by their consciousness survey. As a result, 6th students had favorable image of craft education, saw as useful learning and accepted the learning effect. So they were concerned with the craft in daily life, at the same time there were sex difference and individual difference. We could see to come under the influence of their parents.
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  • Hiroki HARADA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 21-30
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the present conditions and problems in honorific instruction. Research until now has mostly been conducted in the areas of Japanese language pedagogy and sociolinguistics but not in the area of liberal arts language education. Here I shall examine 1) the report, 2) the outline, and 3) the teaching material. The present condition can be said to be one of honorific instruction through communicative proficiency. If we consider how honorific language instruction in real life situations is conducted, then we can see that this learning method is effective, and therefore it can be concluded that we need to instruct from real life situations.
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  • Aki MURATA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 35-39
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
  • Masato OGAWA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 41-46
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The author teaches elementary and secondary social studies methods and other various education courses in the School of Education at Indiana University Kokomo. His elementary social studies methods course focuses on integration, rational-building, and assessment outcomes and value-added student learning. His students are required to complete a comprehensive field experience in an elementary classroom, progressing from observation, aiding the teacher, instruction of the existing curriculum, to the design and implementation of an integrated social studies and science curricular project. His secondary social studies methods students are also required to complete a comprehensive field experience in a secondary social studies classroom, Students are required to develop lessons of which some were to be taught in the middle or high school classroom, pre/post evaluation of student learning, multimedia approach to the concepts, rational, and summative evaluation. The author's focus in international studies through the lens of social studies education, diversity and multicultural education, and social studies education in the United States has afforded him the opportunity to conduct several research studies with scholars from the United States and abroad. He has published various articles in peer-reviewed international and national journals. In addition to those publications, he has made numerous research presentations at international, national, and state/regional conferences. His three international presentations were at the invitations of the Japanese Educational Research Association for the Social Studies and the Japanese Civic Education Association, and the majority of his other research presentations were at the National Council for the Social Studies and the American Educational Research Association conferences, both of which are highly respected professional gatherings in the field of social studies education and educational research. Through presenting and attending international conferences, participating in international and cross-national research projects, reading and writing research articles in international journals, the author has come to recognize the great differences between the social studies education research traditions of the United States and Japan. The United States has largely inherited the western epistemological tradition, which holds an analytical view of the world, typically characterized through empirical investigation, but the Japanese research tradition seems to be rooted in the introspective and to focus more on curriculum and lesson development for teachers. Since Japan and the United States have different cultural and historical backgrounds, the author believes how different epistemological traditions shape social studies education research. In the current era of globalization, many researchers in social studies education want to gain rich insights from comparative studies in varied national contexts. More researchers are becoming interested in conducting and interpreting comparative and international research with scholars in other countries. The author believes that understanding another country's research practices and methodologies can better enable researchers to acknowledge the major concerns and issues that exist across countries. As boundaries between national borders continue to blur, this understanding can help researchers better interpret and present their findings with greater international relevance.
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  • Keita TAKAYAMA
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 47-54
    Published: December 25, 2011
    Released: May 08, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This article reviews the current state and issues of teacher education in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Particularly, it focuses on the role that teacher education and more specifically sociology of education have played in addressing disparity in educational outcomes based on 'race'/ethnicity, language, and socio-economic status. I identify, as one of the central issues with Australian teacher education's effort to rectify social inequality through education, the relative lack of effort to bridge the disciplinary boundaries between those who teach and research curricular methods and those who teach and research social justice issues in education. I use the discussion of this Australian case as a point of reflection for rethinking Japanese teacher education and curricular research in general. In conclusion, I call for more effort on the part of curricular researchers and sociology of education researchers to bridge the existing disciplinary boundaries that have undermined the effectiveness of educational research community and teacher education programs in addressing disparity in educational outcomes.
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