RADIOISOTOPES
Online ISSN : 1884-4111
Print ISSN : 0033-8303
ISSN-L : 0033-8303
Volume 25 , Issue 11
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • Nobuo WADA, Kenji SHINOMIYA
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 687-692
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The preparation of promethium-147 beta-ray sources with curie level intensities by electrodeposition from non-aqueous solutions is described. As the elements chemically analogous to promethium, samarium and neodymium were used to find the best conditions for producing uniform and adhering layers.
    Experience has shown that isopropyl alcohol was favourable as a organic solvent because of the absence of its moisture. Layers electrodeposited from alcohol with a high water content were very powdery and had poor adhesion to the backing. Therefore, the solution for electrodeposition was prepared by adding about 100μl of aqueous solution of the chloride of neodymium or samarium to 20 ml of isopropyl alcohol, or by dissolving those nitrates with same volume of isopropyl alcohol. The concentrations of the materials to be electrodeposited were 200μg/ml. After shaking well all volume of the solution was put in an electrodeposition cell. A platinum wire in the form of a spiral was used as anode. As backing materials, aluminium and stainless steel plates were found to be more favourable than platinum plate from the point of view of the adhesion of electrodeposited layer to those materials. It was derirable to arrange the current density as low as possible because excess current resulted in a less adherent layer. However, current density of more than 120, tA/cm2 was required for producing uniform and adhering layers. From the data of thermal analysis, it was concluded that the chemical form of electrodeposited layer was hydroxide. This layer was converted to oxide by heating the backing with the layer at temperatures above 600°C, and hence, more excellent adhesion of the layer was realized in the form of oxide. In case of samarium, a deposited layer of 0.6 mg/cm2 (0.5 Ci/cm2 calculated in terms of the radioactivity of promethium-147) was obtained in the form of Sm2O3 at a time. Thicker layer can be produced by repeating the electrodeposition after heating the backing with the layer. Similarly, promethium of activity 790 mCi per 5.1 cm2 was also electrodeposited successfully with a carrier of neodymium of 3.0 mg. The yield of electroposition was 98% for the electrolysis of 16 hours at a current density of 200μA/cm2. The sources prejared in this manner are suitable for a wide range of apjlications.
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  • Takehiro TOMITANI, Eiichi TANAKA, Norimasa NOHARA
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 693-698
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A new positron camera consisting of a focal detector of hexagonal multi-crystal array and a conventional Anger type scintillation camera was made. Annihilation γ-ray pair can be picked up among numerous ‘single’ γ-ray events by use of a fast coincidence circuit. A coarse collimator of long focus was designed and adopted to prevent incidence of ineffective ‘single’ γ-rays into scintillation camera, which otherwise limit high counting rate characteristics of the system. This collimator was also so designed that it improves the spatial uniformity of the detection efficiency. Some characteristics of the positron camera are; (1) maximum attainable high counting rate is about 2.5-5 kcps, (2) detection efficiency is 0.6-0.9 dots/sec/μCi, (3) spatial resolution is 6-9 mm (FW HM) (those figures depend on the distance from the collimator surface of the γ-camera to source), (4) area of uniform sensitivity is about 20 cm in diameter at the depth of 20 cm from collimator surface.
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  • Atsushi ANDO, Kinichi HISADA, Itsuko ANDO
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 699-705
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, 22Na, 42K, 86Rb, 134Cs, 64Cu, 110mAg and 198Au—the elements of group I in the periodic table—were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Seven preparations, sodium chloride (22NaCl), potassium chloride (42KCl), rubidium chloride (86RbCl), cesium chloride (134CsCl), cupric chloride (64CuCl2), silver nitrate (110mAgNO3) and chloroauric acid (H198AuCl4) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations but 64CuCl2, 24 hours in 64CuCl2. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and heart were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight.
    110mAgNO3 had considerably strong affinity for the malignant tumor. All preparations but 110mAgNO3 did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. The distribution of 42KCl in the rats very differed from that of 22NaCl, and was similar to the those of 86Rb and 134Cs. The distribution of 86RbCl in the rats was very similar to that of 134CsCl.
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  • Atsushi ANDO, Kinichi HISADA, Itsuko ANDO, Kikuo TERADA
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 706-711
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, manganese (54Mn), technetium (99mTc), rhenium (186Re), bromine (82Br) and iodine (131I) -the elements of group VII in the periodic table-were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Five preparations, manganese chloride (54MnCl2), sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4), sodium perrhenate (Na186ReO4), ammonium bromide (NH482Br) and sodium iodide (Na131I) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations but sodium pertechnetate, 1 hour, 3 hours and 24 hours in sodium pertechnetate. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney spleen and others were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight.
    All of five preparations did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. 54MnCl2 was excreted very slowly out of the body and had some affinity for the pancreas. As Na99mTcO4 and Na186ReO4 was rapidly excreted into the urine, retention values of these two compounds in the organs was very small. NH482Br was excreted very slowly out of the body. In Na131I, a large amount of iodine-131I was accumulated into the thyroid, but retention values of Na131I in other organs was very small.
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  • Yoshiyuki SHIMAMURA, Isao IKEDA, Kunio KURATA, Nobuharu YUI
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 712-716
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A simple kit for the preparation of 99mTc-labeled dimercaptosuccinate in a lyophilized form is described. The kit provides consistent more than 80% yields of the complex hawing the kidney seeking properties. The distribution of the complex was performed in the human by blood clearance, external renal measurements and scintillation camera imaging. Radiation dose based on the organ distribution in human was calculated, and the dose of whole body, kidney, testes and ovaries was 18.7 mrad/mCi, 674 mrad/ mCi, 14.5 mrad/mCi and 20.6 mrad/mCi, respectively.
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  • Masayasu KAN, Tatsuya MIYAMAE
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 717-722
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is assumed that trace amounts of ionic indium-111 are specifically bound to serum transferrin and then in part distributed to the erythroid line in active bone marrow when injected intravenously in the form of 111In-chloride at acid pH. Because of this metabolic manner similar, i f not identical, to iron, 111In-chloride can be used clinically for a bone marrow-imaging agent.
    Clinical studies were undertaken in 23 patients with malignant diseases, such as malignant lymphoma, seminoma, esophageal cancer, uterine cervix carcinoma, etc., who were to receive irradiation in the bone marrow of verteblar column. Scintigrams were obtained with a dual probe scanner at 48 hr after injection of 1 mCi of 111In-chloride.
    The acute and chronic effects of hematopoiesis of focal irradiation to the bone marrow was evaluated with serial scintigraphic studies. The total number of studies were thirty-one, and the period of examination ranged from 1 month to 5 year following radiotherapy.
    These studies have demonstrated that in the irradiated bone marrow the accumulation of indium-111 was markedly inhibited early at 600-1, 000 rads, but that of 99mTc-sulfur colloid not suppressed as yet. These earlier inhibitions of accumulation in the irradiated bone marrow were common phenomenon of all cases, which appears to be coincident with reduction of early precursors at 400-600 rads and complete disappearance of all nucleated cells at 1, 000 cads.
    Of 8 cases receiving less than 2, 000 rads to the bone marrow, only two showed recovery of bone marrow-uptake after radiotherapy, while in the remaining 15 cases who received more than 2, 000 rads the irradiated bone marrow-uptake has not as yet recovered.
    Thus, practically, it appears that the scintigraphy of bone marrow with 111In-chloride provides a useful measure of hematopoietic elements. The exact distribution for carrier-free ionic indium, however, has not as yet been solved, and there are several differences between the physiology of injected indium and iron. As a consequence, further investigations of metabolism and distribution are needed for clinical application.
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  • Yukimasa NAKASHIMA, Hideki OYAMA, Atuko TENKU, Shigeichi MATUMURA, Sei ...
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 723-727
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: September 07, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Immunoreactive plasma glucagon (IRG) and insulin (IRI) in 10 healthy volunteers (within 15 percent of ideal body weight), 27 diabetic subjects and 3 patients with pancreatic diseases were determined by specific radioimmunoassay techniques (antiserum 30K was utilized for plasma glucagon measurements) before and during arginine infusion. Diabetic subjects were divided into 3 groups, 17 mild diabetic group (fasting blood sugar less than 139 mg%), 4 moderate diabetic group (fasting blood sugar 140 to 199 mg%) and 6 severe diabetic group (fasting blood sugar more than 200 mg%) . L-arginine (0.5 g/kg) was infused intravenously during 30 min.
    Fasting IRG levels of healthy controls, mild, moderate and severe diabetic groups were averaged 84±17, 97±16, 105±72, 108±49pg/ml respectively (M±SEM) . These fasting IRG levels of 3 diabetic groups did not differ significantly from that of the controls.
    Although the infusion of arginine induced six- to eight-folds elevation in plasma IRG of all groups including controls, plasma IRG increments following arginine infusion in mild diabetics were significantly greater than that of controls, p<0.05.
    The plasma IRI responses to arginine infusion in mild and severe diabetic groups were significantly lower than that of controls, p<0.05.
    Negative correlation was observed between net increments of IRG and IRI during 30 min of arginine infusion in healthy controls.
    Molar ratio of IRI by IRG in healthy control group were decreased from 4.2 of fasting level to 2.8 to 3.4 of arginine infused levels, and increased slowly toward fasting level after termination of the infusion.
    The arginine infusion evoked almost no responses of IRG in a case of pancreatic cancer and a liver cirrhosis accompanied with diabetes mellitus.
    It appears, therefore, that diabetes mellitus is associated with both a relative fasting hyperglucagonemia and an absolute hyperglucagonemia in response to arginine. Also ai inadequate control of pancreatic A cell function might be responsible for the development o f diabetes mellitus as well as insulin deficiency.
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  • Chia-Lian TSENG
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 728-730
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Nagao IKEDA, Yasuko TAKAHASHI
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 731-733
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yasuhiko INAMOTO, Koji HIGASHIYA, Ryo SIRAKI
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 734-736
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Syozo SUZUKI, Akio OTSUKA, Minoru MURATA, Hideyuki KODERA, Syuichiro M ...
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 737-739
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Keisuke KANAO, Minoru HONDA, Yoshihisa MATSUYUKI, Takashi HARA
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 740-742
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yasuhito SASAKI
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 743-751
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Eitaro WADA
    1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages 752-763
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1976 Volume 25 Issue 11 Pages A1675-A1226
    Published: November 15, 1976
    Released: July 21, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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