Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences)
Online ISSN : 1881-7718
Print ISSN : 0484-6710
ISSN-L : 0484-6710
Volume 26 , Issue 4
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages Cover13-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (36K)
  • Type: Cover
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages Cover14-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (36K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages App6-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (105K)
  • Hideo Tatano, Mikio Tokunaga, Ryozo Kanezaki, Kimio Hashimoto
    Type: Article
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 269-289
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The present study was carried out to classify various sport events and to analyse the elements determining sports participation, especially from sociological aspects. The survey was conducted in class to 261 male and 316 female university students by questionnaire method. The Third Formula of Hayashi's Quantification Scaling (a multi-dimensional analysis in case of no external criterion) and the cluster analysis were applied to the data, from which following results were obtained : 1) The easier the sport events, the greater the degree of sport participation. Males had a slight tendency to participate in competitive and heavy outdoor sports, whereas females tended to participate in ready and sociable indoor sports. 2) Axis^I (masculine vs. feminine or heavy vs. easy), Axis^<II> (popular vs. special or technical), and Axis^<III> (fashionable vs. traditional or recreational vs. competitive) were proved to be significant axes or dimensions discriminating sports. 3) In order to determine the centrality or marginality of sports, the distances from the origin of the coordinate axes were calculated, and to analyse the relative similarity among sports, the distances between each sports were calculated (Fig. 5, 6, 7). As a result, the greater the ratio of sport participation, the more central the distance from the origin and the greater the degree of similarity. 4) Putting the above results together, six patterns of sports were obtained: 1) those which are popular, easy and central; (2) those which are slightly marginal but popular, oriented to pleasure and sociability; (3) those which are individual or outdoor activities as a regular function or for pleasure; (4) those which are masculine, slightly popular and competitive; (5) those which are easy, fashionable and recreational; (6) those which are masculine, heavy, special and marginal. Details are shown in Fig. 7. 5) The relationship between participation patterns in sports and ten elements related to them were analysed. Consequently, Axis^I was closely related to the sexes, the degree of sport participation and the degree of sport experiences; Axis^<II> to the degree of sport experiences, the degree of sport participation, the amount of free time, the degree of sport preference, sport facilities and friends; Axis^<III> to the sexes, the degree of sport experiences, the amount of free time and sport friends. In addition, the elements related to sports had stronger influences on males than females, and social elements on females than males.
    Download PDF (1871K)
  • Osamu Aoyagi, Yoshiyuki Matsuura
    Type: Article
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 291-303
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Many factorial studies on motor ability with Spearman's Two Factor model, Thurstone's Multiple Factor model and Burt's Hierarchical Factor model have been worked out. In this paper, however, motor ability in childhood was factored with 26 × 26 dissimilarity matrix through applying the metrical Multidimensional Scaling and Cluster Analysis, and then the three dimensional motor ability space was resulted. This space was characterized by Physique-axis, Coordination-axis and Extent flexibility-axis. Then, the following 10 motor abilities were extracted through investigating in the configuration of the variable location in this three dimensional motor ability space, and interpreted; 1) Coordination with sight, 2) Agility with Power, 3) Coordination for side jumping, 4) Coordination with power, 5) Coordination for throwing, 6) Coordination for forward rolling, 7) Muscular endurance, 8) Static strength, 9) Extent flexibility, 10) Physique, Refering to the nature of coordination, as long as the present understanding concerned, this type of model of motor ability structure might be considered as more fitted to its nature.
    Download PDF (1004K)
  • Nobuyoshi Fumoto
    Type: Article
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 305-316
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A questionnaire of laterality which contains forty items was given to 141 male and 73 female subjects who were high school, college or university students. Twenty six items asking hand preference were divided into four categories and tabulated respectively. The rate of left handed subjects for asymmetric movements with one hand (ex. writing letters) was smaller than the rate for symmetric movements with one hand (ex. drawing a picture). "Symmetric" means that movements by the right limb and by the left limb are symmetric with respect to plane. The rate for symmetric movements by one hand was smaller than the rate for asymmetric movements by both hands (ex. opening a lid of a bottle) when a functional hand was asked for. It was thought that the so-called dominant hand would play some part for fine adjustments of both-handed movements when the non-dominant hand was used as the functional hand. This might be a reason for increasing the rate of left hand preference in both-handed movements. Eight items asking foot preference were divided into two categories; one-footed movements and both-footed mevements. The foot functionally used was asked for in the both-footed movement items. It was defined as a actively moving foot throughout the movement or as a foot on which less weight was borne. The high degree of lateralization to the right was observed in kicking only. More than twenty percent of the subjects used the left foot as the functional foot except for kicking. Cross tabulations indicate that there are no remarkable relationships between the foot items. This tendency is the same between trunk turning items or eye items. The relationship between the hand preference and the foot preference was not clearly identified. The dominant foot in the functional use should be decided by the kicking foot. The dominant foot for exertion of muscle strength, however, should be decided by two items; the takeoff foot of a broad jump and that of a high jump. If both jumps are done by the same foot, the subject can be considered to have a constant preference in footedness as to the exertion of muscle strength. This concept of the dominant foot, however, would be different from the concept of the dominant hand, for the rate of binominal subjects in footedness was higher than the rate in handedness.
    Download PDF (1054K)
  • Yoshiaki Koyama, Katsuo Fujiwara, Haruo Ikegami, Morihiko Okada
    Type: Article
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 317-325
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to clarify the charactaristics of foot growth and the relationship between the shape of contact surface of the sole and the height of the longitudinal arch in early children. The left feet in 105 children aged 3 to 6 years were investigated. Foot breadth, heel breadth, and the length from the heel to the tip of each toe and to each metatarsal head were measured. The length from the heel to the distal end of the tibia and the fibula and their height were also measured. Inclination angle of the 1st metatarsal was detarmined to evaluate the height of the longitudinal arch. Contact surface of the sole was evaluated using Pedoscope. As the foot length increased with age, the measurements were expressed in values relative to the foot length. While the relative length (RL) from the heel to the tip of each toe did not change, the RLs from the heel to the 2nd-5th metatarsal heads increased with age, and the RLs of the 3rd-5th toes decreased with age. The RLs from the heel to the distal end of the tibia and the fibula decreased with age. This means that the growth of the frontal part of the tarsometatarsal was more conspicuous than that of the rear part. The RLs of the foot breadth and heel breadth did not show the chronological change. The inclination angle of the 1st metatarsal ranged between 16 and 30 degrees and showed no significant correlation with age, whereas the ratio of the noncontact area beneath the inside sole to the contact area increased with age. The correlation between the inclination angle and the relative noncontact area was weak though significant (r=0.258). These results seem to suggest that development of the relative noncontact area should be differentiated from that of the longitudinal arch in considering growth of the foot.
    Download PDF (776K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 326-368
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (2436K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 369-384
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (897K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages App7-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (116K)
  • Type: Index
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages Toc1-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (92K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages App8-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (36K)
  • Type: Cover
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages Cover15-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (140K)
  • Type: Cover
    1982 Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages Cover16-
    Published: March 25, 1982
    Released: September 27, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (140K)
feedback
Top