SHIGAKU ZASSHI
Online ISSN : 2424-2616
Print ISSN : 0018-2478
ISSN-L : 0018-2478
Volume 103 , Issue 3
Showing 1-21 articles out of 21 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages Cover1-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (29K)
  • Type: Cover
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages Cover2-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (29K)
  • Akira Mori
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 317-350,480
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Im J. 64 v. Chr. beschlieBt der Senat, daB die Vereine, die man Collegia nannte, aufgelost werden sollen. Der BeschluB wird nun von Cicero in seinen Reden erwahnt, die er bald nach seiner Ruckkehr von der Verbannung gehalten hat, und Asconius erklart in seinem Kommentar zu den ciceronischen Reden, was den Senat zu dem BeschluB veranlaBte, und welche Wirkungen dieser ausubte. In seinem Kommentar sagt Asconius aber auch: "Solebant autem magistri collegiorum ludos facere, sicut magistri vicorum faciebant, Compitalicios praetextati, qui ludi sublatis collegiis discussi sunt". [p.15 Stangl] Der Sinn des Satzes ist wegen einer UngewiB-heit der Interpunktion sowie wegen der merkwurdigen Wortstellung nicht so leicht zu verstehen. AuBerdem haben wir abgesehen von Cicero nur wenige Paralleluberlieferungen, so daB man den Satz des Asconius verschieden gedeutet hat. Dabei ging es vor allem darum, welche Rolle die magistri collegiorum und die magistri vicorum beim Kult am Kreuzweg (compitum) gespielt haben, und aus welchen Leuten sich die collegia zusammensetzten, die durch das senatus consultum aufgelost wurden. Nach der Auflosung dieser collegia sollen ja auch die ludi Compitalicii aufgehort haben. Dieser Aufsatz bezweckt, die aufschluBgebenden Stellen bei Cicero und Asconius neu zu interpretieren, um dadurch fur die oben genannten Fragen moglichst ausgewogene Losungen zu finden. Am SchluB des Aufsatzes wird dann festgestellt, daB die Compitalia in der Zeit, als sich Dionysios von Halikarnassos in Rom aufhielt, zum Sklavenfest geworden waren. Ferner wird gefragt, wie dies zustande gekommen ist.
    Download PDF (2556K)
  • Takashi Gonoi
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 351-389,478-47
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this paper the author attempts to show how the missionary activity of the Society of Jesus in Tonkin and Japan could not have been carried out in the initial stages of the propagation of the faith without the cooperation and assistance of native lay Christians. He first tries to grasp the concrete functions of native preachers and catechists assisting the Jesuit missionaries. Then, looking at their treatment at the hands of the Jesuits he analyzes their relationship to the Society and their position within its organization. Starting with the problem of the ranking of dojuku inside the Christian Church in Japan, the author observes that Japanese dojuku were granted privileges and given recognition through the rank of "dojuku of the congregation" and confirms that they organized their own community. As there are no native sources from the seventeenth century concerning the activity and role of the catequista at the time of the initial propagation of the faith in Tonkin, the author was forced to rely on the documents left by the missionaries themselves. However, even according to these documents, the catequista in Tonkin played the same important role as their counterparts dojuku in Japan. Pointing out that the missionaries who were expelled from Tonkin by its king would quickly organize a team of catequista and a community of native Christians, the author clarifies the nature of these organizations. He is able to prove that these missionaries took the idea for such organizations directly from the experience of the Society with the "dojuku of the congregation" in Japan. Furthermore, the Jesuit missionaries in Tonkin used the title tai, which was employed in the Buddhist Church in Tonkin, to rank the catequista authorized to teach as "tai-catequista". From this we can see how they pragmatically adapted the ranking system known to them from the example of the Japanese Buddhists to the local conditions prevailing in Tonkin. Thus having shown how the "tai-catequista" of Tonkin correspond to the "dojuku of the congregation" in Japan, the author concludes that both groups were truly indispensable to early Jesuit missionary activities in East Asia.
    Download PDF (2872K)
  • Shigeji Ogura
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 390-415,476-47
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Concerning shinto-related institutions under the Ritsuryo system represented by the custom of state-supported shrines, it has been the conventional opinion that from the late eighth century, as the Ritsuryo codes were more loosely implemented and substantial changes in local communities came about, the Shinto Bureau (jingikan 神祇官) and its authority declined. However, this way of thinking ignores the fact that the number of state-supported shrines were actually increasing from the late eighth century and fails to take into consideration the problem of the hanpei 班幣 system, under which materials for festivals (heihaku 幣帛) were allocated to the shrines. It is true, however, that l) the state shrine system of the eighth century lacked efficacy in its ideal or expressed purpose of carrying out state-supported festivals in honor of both Japan's heavenly and indigenous deities and 2) the number of state shrines were limited. However, from the middle of that century the number of state-supported shrines began to increase with the further development of local governance institutions under the Ritsuryo system, a set of conditions that forced a new kind of response by the state. First, there was a strengthening of the hanpei system by the implementation of penalties for shinto priests who failed to appear at the Bureau for the distribution of heihaku to the shrines ; however, in practice such a response was not very effective. During the Enryaku era the Bureau initiated the institution of specially designated shrines (kanpei-kokuhei-sha 官幣国幣社) and deities (myojin 名神) that were placed directly under the management of the Bureau in the Kinai region and under provincial governors (kokushi 国司) in other regions. Under this system, the control of shinto-related personnel was strengthened, and by indirect control through the agency of provincial governors a stronger and more widespread system was created. The provincial governors attempted to strengthen their control over the shrines in their territories through applications for Bureau recognition and heihaku allocations. This strategy was directly related to both the specially designated deity (myojin) and ranked deity shrine (shinkai-sha 神階社) systems. The myojin system was instituted at the about same time as the kanpei-kokuhei-sha system with the purpose of directly controlling a number of shrines that would invoke divine intercession on behalf of the state. However, in the process by which provincial governors were put in charge of local shrine administration, these shrines were also gradually given special status and ranking by governors in their attempt to strengthen their control. What soon developed therefore was the ranked deity srhine system. From the late eighth century the granting of status and ranking to shrines became more and more the fashion, and as a definite hierarchy became established, this custom was welcomed by both provincial governors interested in increasing their administrative control and local powers interested in raising their political status. Soon, with the granting of status to whole blocks of deities (sho-shin-doji-joi 諸神同時叙位). The task of ranking deity shrines became the object of shrine administration. In addition, with the strengthening of control by provincial governors over shrine administration through granting ranked status, deity ranking became a provincial affair in which the central government did not attempt to intervene. This development in the administration of local shrines is closely related to the overall historical development process of the Ritsuryo system.
    Download PDF (2605K)
  • Tadashi Karube, Toshiaki Ushijima
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 416-423
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (854K)
  • Kanji Ishii
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 423-430
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (858K)
  • Takashi Kuroda
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 430-435
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (635K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 436-437
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (220K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 437-438
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (260K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 439-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (150K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 440-442
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (352K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 442-443
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (254K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 443-444
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (273K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 444-445
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (245K)
  • Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 446-475
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (2162K)
  • Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 476-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (79K)
  • Type: Article
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages 477-480
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (251K)
  • Type: Appendix
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages App1-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (76K)
  • Type: Cover
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages Cover3-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (41K)
  • Type: Cover
    1994 Volume 103 Issue 3 Pages Cover4-
    Published: March 20, 1994
    Released: November 30, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (41K)
feedback
Top