ITE Technical Report
Online ISSN : 2424-1970
Print ISSN : 1342-6893
ISSN-L : 1342-6893
32.43
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    Pages Cover1-
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Index
    Pages Toc1-
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Wataru Sato, Shota Uono, Naomi Matsuura, Motomi Toichi
    Type: Article
    Session ID: ME2008-158
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    It has been suggested that juvenile delinquents have impaired recognition of facial expression, although this remains controversial. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in 24 male juvenile delinquents incarcerated in reformatories. Their performance was compared with 24 age- and gender-matched controls. The participants matched the emotion of facial expressions with appropriate verbal labels, using standardized photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions. The juvenile delinquents were less accurate at recognizing the facial expressions disgust and sadness than controls. When compared with controls, the juvenile delinquents frequently misrecognized the facial expression disgust as anger. These results suggest that impaired emotional communication via facial expressions, specifically a bias toward a hostile interpretation, may be related to juvenile delinquency.
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  • Kaoru SUMI, Mizue NAGATA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: ME2008-159
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    This paper describes the results of an experiment on influence compliance given by a character agent. We set up scenarios that evoked feelings in a user and controlled the agent's reaction in order to evaluate the user's impression of the agent. In this experiment, we made 96 patterns of content, which were a combination of the emotional scenario and the facial expressions and words used by the agent. The test subjects accessed the content and answered a questionnaire on the Web. In this paper we discuss the experimental results and the future work.
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  • Masayoshi Nagai, Takatsune Kumada, Patrick J. Bennett, M. D. Rutherfor ...
    Type: Article
    Session ID: ME2008-160
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Classification images (CIs) can reveal observers' strategies in a variety of visual tasks. However, one weakness of the CI method is that many trials are needed to obtain stable data. We used sampled face presentation technique to get CIs with fewer number of trials (2,900 trials or fewer) for applying CIs to clinical populations, and compared the face processing strategy between typically-developed and autisitic observers. Basically, typical observers strongly used the region of eyes and eyebrows, and autistic observers did not use those regions. However, there were individual differences within a group: some of autistic observers used the similar region to typically developed and vice versa.
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  • Tomoko ISHIGAKI, Takeshi TAKAI, Takashi MATSUYAMA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: ME2008-161
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    We often edit facial shading and shadows in taking the photograph. It means that we can edit the facial impression with the facial shading and shadows, which can control an appearance of a 3D surface without editing a 3D geometry of a face. In this paper, we propose a new method for editing facial shading and shadows to control impression without changing the 3D shape of the face, that is we create a new appearance of a face by overlaying shading and shadows which are generated with a goal 3D shape to the facial image. We demonstrate its effectiveness with experimental results of real facial images.
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  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App1-
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App2-
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (78K)
  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App3-
    Published: October 11, 2008
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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