ITE Technical Report
Online ISSN : 2424-1970
Print ISSN : 1342-6893
ISSN-L : 1342-6893
33.45
Showing 1-27 articles out of 27 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    Pages Cover1-
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Index
    Pages Toc1-
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Kazutaka SUZUKI, Haruyoshi TOYODA, Munenori TAKUMI, Naohisa MUKOZAKA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-122/CE2009-58
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    In recent years, the feature analysis of eye blink by counting its number or measuring its speed has been attracted from a viewpoint of the human health indicators to measure the degree of sleepiness, the degree of fatigue, and so on. However, previously reported non-contact measurement systems don't have enough temporal accuracy to measure the feature of blink which is observed in the period between 100ms to 200ms, because most of previous measurement systems used CCD camera with 30fps (frame per second). In this report, we have constructed a noncontact, high-speed and high-accurate blink measurement system by employing an intelligent vision sensor with image-capturing and processing of 1,000fps. We have measured the features of blink such as the maximum speed, duration time, displacement at close/open eye, from the position of the eyelid. We have also evaluated those features before and after VDT load task. We confirmed the maximum speed deterioration at the close-eye of blink on the task of continuously blink as fast as possible.
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  • Yuji KOHASHI, Tsuyoshi SUENAGA, Kentaro TAKEMURA, Jun TAKAMATSU, Tsuka ...
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-123/CE2009-59
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Portability of an eye tracking system encourages us to develop the technique for estimating 3D gaze position. Unlike the conventional methods, which estimate the position in the 2D image coordinates of the mounted camera, such a technique can represent richer gaze information of the human who moves in the larger area. In this paper, we propose a method for estimating 3D gaze position in the world coordinates by the head-mounted device. We employ visual SLAM technique to estimate head configuration and extract the environmental information. Even in the case where the head dynamically moves, the proposed method could obtain the point-of-regard.
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  • Mizuho KOMORI, Kazutake UEHIRA, Masahiro SUZUKI
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-124/CE2009-60
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    This paper describes the degree of invisibility in optical-digital watermarking that we propose to prevent the illegal use of captured images of objects such as paintings in museums. As it uses illumination that contains watermarking to illuminate an object, a photograph of the object also contains watermarking. The key to this technique is to make watermarking invisible when it is projected onto objects. We conducted a subjective test where optical images of watermarking produced by discrete-cosine and Hadamard transforms were projected onto the printed image. The results from the test demonstrated that we could make the watermarking pattern invisible in a practical situation where we applied this technique although this depended on the contrast in the pattern. We also confirmed our technique was feasible.
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  • Masakatsu OHTA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-125/CE2009-61
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    An agent model that estimates advertisement performances is proposed. The agent notices and remembers frequently presented advertisements among many objects as the human brain subconsciously does. The mere exposure effect shows that these remembered objects are considered a person's profile indicating his or her preferences. If an advertisement is included in the profile, the agent supposes it's effective. In this model, independent component analysis is used to extract advertisement images from pictures that contain many objects. Computer experiments in augmented reality spaces confirmed that the advertisement performance depends on how properly a person perceives simultaneously presented objects.
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  • Keiji OSAKI
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-126/CE2009-62
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    It was shown that spatial aliasing such as Moire fringes in 2D images was reduced in the process of shrinking images by 3D texture mapping method with anti-aliasing effects. For this new method to be an effective resizing method for 2D images, relationship formula between size of object on display window and a field of view of the window was also presented. As an applicable method for reduction of image size, it was tested for reducing a huge tessellated image and the result was found to be successful to mitigate aliasing in the image.
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  • Nobuhiko ASAKURA, Toshio INUI
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-127/CE2009-63
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Previous studies have revealed that object-centered and environmental frames of reference are involved in mentally representing an object and its spatial transformations. This study examined the relative contributions of each reference frame to the process of mental rotation. We devised ambiguous mental rotation stimuli consisting of planar disk objects, with a one-parameter family of possible axes of rotation between target and test objects. The possible axes included both an object's intrinsic axis for minimum rotation and an environmental axis (vertical or horizontal). Participants were first required to imagine smooth one-shot rotation of the test object to the orientation of the target object. They then reproduced the direction of an arrow depicted on the top face of the test object after imagined rotation, from which the axis being used for mental rotation was estimated. The results demonstrate that when competing with the intrinsic axes, the vertical axis was more effectively used for mental rotation, but the horizontal axis was rarely used. Further analysis suggests that a viewer rotation strategy may be responsible for the small amount of mental rotation around the environmental axes. These findings are consistent with a view that multiple frames of reference are interactively engaged for mental manipulation of objects.
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  • Takahiro Kawabe
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-128/CE2009-64
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    In single portrait by Picasso, multiple gaze directions are simultaneously depicted, leading to bistable perception of gaze direction. It is an intriguing issue what kind of perceptual processing mediates the bistable gaze perception in Picasso's portrait. This study reported single case study on this issue with focusing on "Marie-Therese Walter". In Experiment 1, a reverse correlation method revealed both an eye and nose were diagnostic features for an averted gaze, while a pair of eyes was a diagnostic feature for a direct gaze. In Experiment 2, it was found that an upright portrait caused two interpretations of gaze direction (averted and direct gazes), while an inverted portrait caused a single interpretation of gaze direction (direct gaze), suggesting a selective impairment of averted gaze perception by inversion. The results suggest that simultaneous encodings of diagnostic features for different gaze perception underlie bistable perception of gaze direction in "Marie-Therese Walter".
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  • Yukyu ARARAGI, Akiyoshi KITAOKA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-129/CE2009-65
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the effect of duration of stimuli on the grid-type extinction illusion. A white disc with black edge was presented at an intersection (intersection condition) or near an intersection (alley condition) of gray alleys on black background or was presented on a unique black or gray background (background condition). Experiment 1 examined the effects of duration of the stimuli and retinal eccentricity of the disc on the extinction illusion. Experiment 2 examined the effect of the visual field of stimuli on the extinction illusion. The subjects' task was reported the number of perceived white discs. Two experiments showed the following results in the intersection condition. (1) The frequency that the disc was perceived decreased as the duration of the stimuli increased, if the duration was over 1000ms. (2) The frequency that the disc was perceived decreased as retinal eccentricity increased. (3) The disc presented in the upper visual field was perceived less frequently than that in the lower visual field, when the duration was 200ms; there was no anisotropy when the duration was 6000ms. These results showed that the grid-type extinction illusion depends on the duration and the retinal eccentricity.
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  • Kayo MIURA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-130/CE2009-66
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    There are photographs whose subjects seem to be miniatures although they are real objects. Such photographs are interesting in three viewpoints. First, it's from the point of view of size-distance judgment in depth perception. What kinds of visual factors are involved in this miss-judgment? Second, it's from the point of view of the reality judgment. How do we judge whether it is a real object or not? Third, it's from the socio-cultural background of the appearance of these photographs. While the recordability of photographs increases technically, the photographs denying it have appeared one after another. What kind of social background is involved in this phenomenon? Focusing the first viewpoint, I will discuss the miniature effect from the visual factors, such as camera angle, out-of-focus, color-contrast, linear perspective, and so on. I will also briefly refer to the reality judgment and the socio-cultural background. Aisthesis comes from an ancient Greek word which means "perception" in a broad sense. This concept can be approached from various viewpoints, namely, from sensation to emotion, and from physiology to culture. Through the photographs whose subjects look like miniatures, I would like to discuss about "the perception as aisthesis" from the multi-layered viewpoints.
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  • Minoru YOKONO, Masahiro SUZUKI, Kazutake UEHIRA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-131/CE2009-67
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    The authors proposed the new technique for the estimation of the visually perceived location of the virtual objects using an observer's action. In this study, visually perceived depth of the virtual object for which the observer reaches out is estimated by fitting the depth of the observer's hand as a function of movement time into the gaussian function. The results indicate that accuracy and precision of the estimation is very high, and support the authors' proposal.
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  • Yuki YAMADA, Kayo MIURA, Takahiro KAWABE
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-132/CE2009-68
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    When a leading cue stimulus is presented near a subsequent target, the perceived location of the target is displaced from the cue (attentional repulsion). On the other hand, a target is sometimes mislocalized toward the cue (attentional attraction) or fovea (foveal bias). In the present study, we assumed that these three mislocalizations were the individual spatial distortion depending on a retention interval after seeing the target, and then we sought how the order of these mislocalizations was. We used a relative location judgment task and manipulated the stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA) between the target and the probe across three lengths (0, 550, and 1250msec). The results of Experiment 1 showed that attentional repulsion occurred with SOA of 0ms, and next, foveal bias occurred with SOA of 550ms, and finally, attentional attraction occurred with SOA of 1250ms. Moreover, Experiment 2 demonstrated that attentional attraction occurred without prior attentional repulsion. These results suggest that attentional repulsion occurred at the perceptual stage and location information of the target is exposed to dual distortion of foveal bias and attentional attraction at the memory stage.
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  • Naoko TERAUE, Masayuki SATO
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-133/CE2009-69
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    When the visual target blanks for a while immediately after a saccade, saccadic suppression of image displacement is degraded (blanking effect). This suggests that the visual image immediately after a saccade is important to form visual stability. We investigated whether the blanking effect remained when the target was isoluminant with the background. In the luminance condition the blanking effect was confirmed, however in the isoluminance condition the blanking effect diminished. These results suggest that the luminance information has more important role than the color information in forming visual stability across saccadic eye movements.
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  • Masayuki SATO, Shoji SUNAGA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-134/CE2009-70
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Influences of stimulus size and visual field on apparent depth from binocular disparity were measured using a random-dot stereogram with one dimensional DoG disparity modulation along horizontal or vertical direction. Standard deviations of two Gaussians were 1deg and 1.5deg respectively, corresponding to 0.18cpd peak spatial frequency. The stimulus subtended 10deg to the direction with disparity modulation and the size perpendicular to that direction was varied from 0.25deg to 20deg. In other conditions, central area of 2deg to 14deg was blanked in the 20-deg test stimulus. The results show that to detect disparity modulation along horizontal direction more than 6deg stimulus size was necessary, however, to detect vertical modulation much smaller stimulus size was enough and that peripheral visual field was sensitive to disparity modulation.
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  • Kohei Miura, Yasuaki Tamada, Masayuki Sato
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-135/CE2009-71
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    We have shown that apparent depth for large disparity is greatly facilitated by motion parallax. We hypothesized that this facilitation is due to the transient nature of stereoscopic depth perception. To test this hypothesis we compared apparent depth for moving disparate stimulus with that for flickering one. The test stimulus consisted of three points aligned vertically with large disparity gradient. Three observers reported perceived slant by a matching method. The results showed that perceived depth for moving stimulus was much larger than that for flickering stimulus, suggesting that motion not just transience facilitates apparent depth for large disparity.
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  • Tadashi Hatakeyama, Ippei Negishi, Hirohiko Kaneko
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-136/CE2009-72
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    It has been reported that the strength and latency differ depending on the direction of vection. For example, the vection produced by expanding visual motion (forward vection) is stronger than that produced by contracting motion (backward vection). This perceptual anisotoropy could be due to the difference in the experiential accumulation of the expanding and contracting visual patterns in general living environment. In the present study, we aimed to show whether this assumption is valid or not. To clarify this, we did two experiments. In experiment 1, it was investigated whether a long-term experience affects vection, In the experiment 2, it was investigated whether a short-term experience would affect vection by learning.Through experiments 1 and 2, It was clarified that a long-term experience and the short-term experience influence vection.
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  • Yusuke Kitazawa, Keiji Uchikawa
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-137/CE2009-73
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    The human visual system can stably perceive the color of the objects or surface despite the change of the illuminant. In this study, we examined whether the chromaticity and luminance of natural scenes resemble those of optimal color which has valid cue for the illuminant estimation. Our results show that natural scenes have similar feature to optimal color in some respects, so it is possible that we can estimate the illuminant from the chromaticity and luminance of a natural scene.
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  • Hiroto KIMURA, Takehiro NAGAI, Shigeki NAKAUCHI
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-138/CE2009-74
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    A previous study has reported that sensitivity to luminance modulation on multiple targets decreases when they are perceived as a single object with apparent motion. To investigate the effect of apparent motion on color perception,, we measured color discrimination sensitivity on apparent motion stimuli with color modulation. The stimuli were circles that were sequentially presented on a circular trajectory counterclockwise. The SOA (Stimulus Onset Asynchrony) could control the strength of apparent motion perception. The colors of the stimuli were modulated between two colors during presentation. The observer was instructed to discriminate these two colors. In the results, the color discrimination thresholds at the SOA where apparent motion perception was the strongest were higher than those at other SOAs. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is that color information on multiple targets perceived as a single object is integrated along their perceptual motion trajectory.
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  • Naruhiko FUKINO, Keiji UCHIKAWA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-139/CE2009-75
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    It is well known that tree types of cones and opponent color channels exist in the our color vision system. Recently, it was suggested that multiple chromatic channels existed in higher level. However their precise features are not yet obvious. Our purpose is to reveal these features of the multiple chromatic channels by comparing results of dichoptic chromatic-masking with those of monocular chromatic-masking. A target stimulus was Gabor modulated along the r/g axis. A mask stimulus consisted of random dots modulated varied color directions. Results of dichoptic masking suggest that the direction slightly tilted to y/b axis is independent of r/g axis. Results of monocular masking could not be compared with those of dichoptic masking because effects of monocular masking are weak.
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  • Keiko IHAYA, Yuki YAMADA, Takahiro KAWABE, Tomoyasu NAKAMURA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-140/CE2009-76
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Resilience is a mental capacity of people to cope with harmful events such as abuse, disaster, and so forth. So far, resilience has been investigated by mainly using self-report questionnaires and hence, the explanation by past findings is limited to the explicit aspect of resilience. The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between implicit and explicit aspects of resilience. As an explicit measure, we used self-report questionnaire consisted of four types of resilience scales that can assess understanding/utilization of the own personal/environmental resources. Meanwhile, as an implicit measure, we employed an implicit association test that disclosed an automatic evaluation for the availability of closely related people for each observer: it was hypothesized that the availability for closely related people would be positively related with one of explicit aspects of resilience (i.e. utilization of the environmental resources of resilience). Fourteen adults took part in the experiment which consisted of both the implicit and explicit tests. As a result, there was a significant correlation between the scale scores and implicit association scores for the utilization of the environmental resources. The results suggest that at least a part of the resilience mechanism is implicit.
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  • Misato Sonoda, Sahoko Komatsu, Yuji Hakoda
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-141/CE2009-77
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    This study was aimed at examining an interference between the processing of expression and word (Kanji) processing using Stroop-like task. The task of participants was to judge whether the meaning of a letter shown on a nose or an expression of the face was a positive or negative. The results of the experiment showed the automatic processing of face (an expression) interfered with the semantic processing of kanji word. On the other hand, the positive words facilitated only the processing of a happy expression. These results suggested that the asymmetry in the interference between emotional word processing and facial expression processing depended on the processing speed of the verbal material used.
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  • Megumi Haraguchi, Yuki Yamada, Yuji Hakoda
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-142/CE2009-78
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Emotionally charged stimuli inserted in rapid serial visual presentation of distractors impair subsequent target detection (emotion-induced blindness). In this study, in order to examine whether emotion-induced blindness stemmed from involuntary attentional capture based on the reaction of affective system, we employed subliminal affective habituation. Observers were instructed to identify three, simultaneously presented, alphabetical targets. Observers, the target detection was impaired when the emotional stimuli were presented 200ms before the target. On the other hand, after subliminal affective habituation, the target detection was not impaired by the negative emotional stimuli. Thus, these results revealed emotion-induced blindness was eliminated by prior subliminal affective habituation and suggested that emotion-induced blindness was attributable to the attentional dwelling on the emotional stimuli intervened by emotional valence processing in the affective system.
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  • Kentaro YAMAMOTO, Kayo MIURA
    Type: Article
    Session ID: HI2009-143/CE2009-79
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Faster moving stimuli are judged to be longer in duration than slower or stationary ones having the same actual duration (called "time dilation"). In this study, we examined whether a sense of speed in static images cause time dilation as well as physical speed. In Experiment 1, we examined the effect of a sense of speed inferred from the posture of human character by time reproduction task. The physical durations of the stimuli were 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5s. The result showed that the reproduced durations were not influenced by the sense of speed of the stimuli. In Experiment 2, we conducted a temporal bisection task with an anchor duration pair (0.1s vs. 0.4s) to measure the perceived time. The result showed that perceived duration was longer when participants observed running or walking posture of human character than they observed standing posture of it. These results indicate that although a sense of speed in static images cause time dilation, the effect is lower than that of physical speed.
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  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App1-
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App2-
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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  • Type: Appendix
    Pages App3-
    Published: October 29, 2009
    Released: September 20, 2017
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
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