Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
Volume 18 , Issue 10
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
  • Michiya ARISAWA, Takeshi TAKAHASHI, Tomiya UCHINO, Tsutomu WATANABE, T ...
    1965 Volume 18 Issue 10 Pages 620-625
    Published: October 20, 1965
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    total of 49 cases of various diseases were treated by intramuscular injection with kanamycin sulfate solution.
    1) Eight adult cows affected with bronchopneumonia, bronchitis, or liver abscess were injected with 3 to 5g daily for 1 to 4 days. Seven of them recovered in 2 to 8 days.
    2) Five calves affected with bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, or calf scour were injected with 1 to 3g daily for 1 to 3 days. All of them recovered in 2 to 6 days.
    3) A horse affected with bronchitis was given once and recovered in 2 days.
    4) Three adult swine affected with puerperal fever or erysipelas were injected with 2 to 3g once or for 2 days and recovered in 2 to 4 days.
    5) Two piglets suffering from bronchopneumonia were injected with 0.5g once. One of them recovered in 2 days, and the other died at 2 days.
    6) Twenty-eight dogs affected with distemper, bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, black tongue, nephritis, endometritis, and suppurative trauma and 2 cats with external otitis were injected with 0.25×0.5g daily for 1 to 6 days. Of the 30 cases, 22 recovered in 3 to 15 days.
    7) The rate of recovery due to kanamycin therapy was 73.3% in the small animals, 92.8% in the large animals, and 80.0% in the swine.
    8) When injected jointly with penicillin, kanamycin seemed to show a powerful antibacterial effect.
    Download PDF (1228K)
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1965 Volume 18 Issue 10 Pages 626-628
    Published: October 20, 1965
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (433K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1965 Volume 18 Issue 10 Pages 631-632
    Published: October 20, 1965
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (288K)
  • Keiji MATSUOKA, Teruhiko KISHI, Joji NAGANO
    1965 Volume 18 Issue 10 Pages 633-635
    Published: October 20, 1965
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Two mammals, Meles anakuma and Felis catus, kept in separate cages at the Tennoji zoo in Osaka succumbed, two months apart, showing a cut watery diarrhea.
    At antopsy, Salmonella enteritidis was isolated from the intestinal contents of both animals.
    Download PDF (586K)
  • Yutaka NISHIMURA, Hideo KAWASHIMA, Hisashi YAMAMOTO, Noriyuki KOYAMA
    1965 Volume 18 Issue 10 Pages 636-640
    Published: October 20, 1965
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the first part of this series (17) living Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine made by the Philips-Duphar Company in the Netherlands was tested for immunity and proved to be very effective to prevent the infection of NDV. This time, living NDV vaccine made by Dr. Salsbury's Laboratory in the U. S. A. was examined for safety and potency, and the following results were obtained.
    1) Some 3-to 8-day-old chickens were vaccinated per os and intranasally with 2 doses, and then challenged with the virulent strain SATO 21 days, 1 month, and 2 months after vaccination. The survival rate was 80 to 100%. A similar experiment was performed with laying hens, and a 100% survival rate was obtained. The titers of HI and SN of these vaccinated birds were <1-320 and 10-1000, respectively; that is, they were higher than those of non-vaccinated birds, which were <5 and <1, respectively.
    2) The development of immunity seemed to occur 7 days after vaccination.
    3) The presence of vaccine-virus was proved in the alimentary canal and trachea of chickens sacrificed on the first to 7th day after vaccination, the feces of a chicken killed 3 days after vaccination, and the heart blood, a mixed tissue emulsion (spleen, pancreas, lung, and kidney) of a chicken slaughtered 14 days after vaccination. It was also demonstrated in the liver and a mixed tissue emulsion (spleen, pancreas, kidney, and lung) of non-vaccinated chickens which had been raised in the same cage with the vaccinated birds, 14 and 21days after vaccination.
    4) In the course of immunization, only three birds died from bacterial contamination (1.4%). The other birds showed no clinical abnormality nor drop in laying rate. Thirty-day-old chickens vaccinated per os with 10 to 50 doses survived for 14 days, without showing any clinical abnormality.
    Download PDF (1026K)
feedback
Top