Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
Volume 17 , Issue 10
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 509-514
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • I. OHISHI, [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 515-519
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Positive Takata tests were given by 68.5 per cent of 19 dogs which harbored immature filariae in the heart and lung as a result of experimental infection and which were presumed to be 37 to 48 days of infection. Nine untreated control dogs which had been kept under the same conditions as the infected ones gave all negative results in the same test.
    A total of 193 dogs were collected at random from retention compounds and examined for any relationship between Takata test and filariasis. The ratio of positive test was 13.0 per cent among dogs free from the infection. It was 57.9 per cent among those harboring immature worms and 73.0 per cent among those infected with mature worms.
    A total of 138 dogs parasitized with filariae were examined for the number of worms harbored and the intensity of the Takata test. Many of the negative reactors were those harboring a relatively small number of filariae. Those infected with a comparatively large number of parasites occupied a greater portion of the positive reactors. There was a tendency that the larger the number of worms harbored, the more intense the Takata test.
    Of 12 ascitic dogs at the final stage of filariasis, 95.2 per cent gave positive Takata tests. Intensely positive reactors were found in 61.9 per cent o them.
    From the results of the Takata test and clinical symptoms, canine filariae was regarded as consisting of four stages. In stage I, the general clinical symptoms shown included no final-stage symptoms and there were not more than 2 test tubes showing precipitation in the test. The number of test tubes exhibiting positive reaction was 3 to 5 in stage II and 6 or more in stage III. Dogs manifesting final-stage symptoms were classified into those in stage IV, regardless of results of the test.
    A total of 106 dogs were examined for frequency of distribution of the number of parasites per capita by the stage of infection. A tendency was observed that the more advanced the stage of infection, the higher became the rate of dogs harboring a relatively large number of worms and the larger the average number of worms harbored by the dogs in the same stage.
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  • A. ATAMI, K. AOYAGI, S. ONO, T. SUZUKI, H. SUZUKI, K. KURIHARA, H. NIS ...
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 521-526,539
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A total of 244 persons were reported officially to be involved in an outbreak of food poisoning possibly attributed to whale-meat bacon in Yamagata and its neighboring areas in Yamagata Prefecture at the end of August. One fatal case occurred in the city of Yamagata.
    The period of incubation was 12 to 21 hours in most cases. The main symptoms consisted of fever, stomachache, vomiting, and diarrhea and were almost identical with those of food poisoning known to be caused by enteritis vibriones.
    The incriminated food was whale-meat bacon, which had been eaten without being cooked. The same food as this, in raw state, was given per os to mice and cats without any ill effect. Bacteriological examination failed to detect any known pathogenic organisms, except staphylococci, or such enteritis vibriones as identical with those of the known serotype.
    Enteritis vibrio O-2 (“E” by Agatsuma's classification) was detected from 19 (76%) of 25 fecal specimens collected from the patients involved. Staphylococcus and Proteus were also detected from these specimens. Most of the staphylococci isolated from the whale-meat bacon, and the fecal specimens were coagulase-positive.
    All the strains of enteritis vibriones isolated from the fecal specimens were pathogenic for mice. So were three strains of these organisms isolated from the whale-meat bacon.
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  • S. NAMIOKA, M. MURATA, T. IGARASHI
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 529-534
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    On a hog farm in Gumma Prefecture, the first outbreak of so-called colisepsis, or infection with Escherichia coli, of newborn piglets occurred in the spring of 1961. About 140 piglets, produced by sows kept on the same farm, were raised on the farm in the summer of 1962, when almost all of them were involved in the second outbreak of this disease and succumbed of infection.
    1. Etiological examination indicated that they had died of septicemia caused by E. coli. No other bacteria or known viruses were isolated from them.
    2. The amount of gamma-globulin in the serum was much smaller in piglets involved in clinical infection than in healthy piglets of the same age kept on other farms. It was impossible to detect any antibody against the colon bacilli derived from the organs of clinically infected piglets from the colostrum of sows which had given birth to the piglets.
    3. In an experiment of prevention of this disease, the fatality rate for the first week was only 6.5 per cent among animals which had received preventive inoculation, while it was about 70 per cent among untreated control animals.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 535-539
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (987K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1964 Volume 17 Issue 10 Pages 541-543
    Published: October 20, 1964
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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