Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
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Farm Animal Medicine and Animal Health
  • Nobumichi FURUTA, Yoko SUTO
    Type: Original Article
    2019 Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 279-284
    Published: May 20, 2019
    Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this study, we report on two cases of renal dysplasia in calves and analyze the pathological examination focusing on intercellular junctions. Findings in the two autopsies included discolored kidneys and rugged surface. Histopathologically, extensive and focal interstitial fibrosis was observed in case 1 and case 2, respectively. In order to observe the localization of the intercellular junctions, we analyzed the affected kidneys by immunohistochemistry using claudin-16, K-cadherin and integrin α6 antibodies for the tight junction, adhesive junction and hemidesmosome, respectively. Abnormal localizations of claudin-16 and K-cadherin were observed in both cases, which were not observed in control. These results suggested that the abnormal localization of intercellular junctions plays a role in the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. Pathological studies focusing on the intercellular junctions would help to elucidate the renal dysplasia.

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  • Hideaki OMAGARI, Koji MISUMI, Miho MIYASHITA, Shigeki NAGAFUCHI, Shoko ...
    Type: Original Article
    2019 Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 285-290
    Published: May 20, 2019
    Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    To develop a procedure for piglet production by embryo transfer (ET) at pig farms, we examined the effects of (1) the incubation period after the warming of vitrified embryos and (2) the body position of the ET recipients on the pregnancy success rate. For donor embryos, we used vitrified embryos just after warming or incubated at 38 °C for 2 hours after warming. The embryos were transferred non-surgically via a deep intrauterine catheter into the uterus of 25 recipient sows in a standing or lying position. Piglets were born only when the non-surgical ET was performed with the recipient in a lying position, with or without the 2-hour incubation period. Based on these results, vitrified and warmed embryos in a thermos bottle containing water at 38 °C were transported from Saga Prefectural Livestock Experiment Station to two commercial pig farms in Saga Prefecture. The transported embryos were transferred non-surgically to a total of 10 sows in a lying position at farms. As a result, one sow became pregnant but failed to farrow.

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Small Animal Medicine
  • Nobuyuki SHIRANAGA, Hirohito HASAKO, Yasuhiro SOUZU, Kento YAMAMOTO, T ...
    Type: Original Article
    2019 Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 291-295
    Published: May 20, 2019
    Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The subclinical infection of Babesia gibsoni in 500 clinically healthy dogs was examined in an endemic area for canine babesiosis in Japan. A total of 38 dogs (7.6%) was defined as having a subclinical infection based on positive results of B. gibsoni-specific PCR. The mean age of dogs with a subclinical infection was 9.2 years, which was significantly higher than that of dogs with negative PCR and no history of B. gibsoni infection (7.4 years). Almost all dogs in the subclinical population (97.4%) go outside regularly. Analysis of 275 dogs with a habit of going outside and no history of B. gibsoni infection revealed significantly lower complete prevention rate for tick infestation in the subclinical population (6.3%) than the PCR-negative population (44.8%). Outdoor activity and incomplete tick-prevention were thought to be risk factors for B. gibsoni infection. Red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet counts for dogs with a subclinical infection were all significantly lower than those of dogs without an infection and history of B. gibsoni infection. It is obvious that subclinical infection of B. gibsoni affects blood test findings of dogs.

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Veterinary Public Health, Wildlife and Environmental Conservation
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