Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association
Online ISSN : 2186-0211
Print ISSN : 0446-6454
ISSN-L : 0446-6454
Volume 24 , Issue 5
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 221-225
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Tsutomu MAEDA, T HAYASHI, H SASAKI, I TSUMURA
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 226-231
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Seven cases of genital tumor were found in 6 cows and 1 sow among out-patients treated in the authors, university veterinary hospital and materials submitted to the diagnostic laboratory of the same university.
    1. Uterine tumor was found in 3 Holstein and 1 indigenous Japanese cows and 1 sow. It was located almost in the middle portion of the uterine horn in every case, and child's fist and egg in size in the cowsand sow, respectively. Histologically, it was leiomyoma in all the cases, except in a cow which presented leiomyosarcoma of a little low malignancy. Ovarian cyst was observed in a cow. Breeding resulted in sterility and estrus was disturbed or ceased in 2 cows. Such changes caused by circulatory disturbances as atrophy, edema, and vascular changes, as well as chronic endometritis, were noticed distinctly in the uterus.
    2. Vaginal tumor was found in a Holstein and a Japanese cow (at 8 months of pregnancy). It was almost gooses egg in size and had a stem. Histologically, it was leiomyoma or fibroma. Both cows recovered after surgical removal of the tumor.
    The 6 cows were 7 years or more of age. Four of them were 10 years or more of age Genital tumors have been reported infreguently among domestic animals in Japan.
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 232-234
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • A KAWAKUBO, K TAKEHARA, H NAKAMURA, M MITSUI, J NAKAMURA, T IIDA, H KI ...
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 237-242
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is possible to prevent stillbirth in swine caused by infection with Japanese encephalitis virus by inoculating sows with 2 or 3 10-ml doses or 3 5-ml doses of the existing high-potency Japanese encephalitis vaccine. This trial was carried out in Shizuoka Prefecture in 1969 to find a possibility of reducing the amount and the number of doses of vaccine for inoculation. In it, a vaccine was prepared tentatively in such manner as to contain tissues at a concentration about 3 times as high as that of the existing high-potency vaccine.
    A total of 119 nulliparous swine were divided into 5 groups, A to E. Group A of 27 antibody-negative animals was inoculated with two 10-ml doses of the existing high-potency vaccine, and group B of 29 animals with a single 10-ml dose of the tentatively prepared high-concentration vaccine. Group C of 24 animals was set up as uninoculated control group, and group D of 28 antibody-positive animals as another control group. Group E of 11 antibodypositive animals was inoculated with a single 10-ml dose of the high-potency vaccine. In caeh group, antibody titers were determined 3 weeks after inoculation and immediately after parturition, and the results of delivery recorded.
    After inoculation 100 and 96 % of the animals of groups A and B, respectively, turned to be positive for antibodies, neutralizing and hemagglutinationinhibiting.
    The average number of young normally delivered per litter was 8.3 (in 16 sows examined) in group A, 8.2 (in 17 sows) in group B, 5.3 (in 14 sows) in group C, 9.7 (in 15 sows) in group D, and 9.7 (in 7 sows) in group E. There was a marked difference in this number between the inoculated groups (A and B) and the uninoculated control groups, but no difference between groups A and B.
    Group B presented no inferior results of delivery but relatively low rate of antibody production and average antibody titer, as compared with group A.
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  • SHIGERU KIMURA, Y ONO
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 245-249
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Lymnaea truncatula is one of the oldest snails ever known as intermediate host of Fasciola hepatica in Europe. It has been clarified tha tthe intermediate host present in Japan is L. ollula. Recently, L. truncatula and Physa acuta have been found in the northern and the southwestern part of Japan, respectively. Higashi verified experimentally that the latter might have a role as an intermediate host.
    The present authors tried to induce experimental infection with miracidia of liver flukes (Fasciola sp.) in two species of snails, L. truncatula and Physa sp., which had been collected from a stream in Taki County, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan.
    L. truncatula was examined for possibility of acting as snail vector for liver flukes. No development of larvae was seen, except an aberrant development which was observed when the snail was exposed to miracidia of liver flukes within 6 or 7 days after the infection. It is clear that the Japanese L. truncatula is identical with no species of snails in Europe from a biological point of view, thouth it is very close to the snail in Europe morphologically.
    Experimental infection was carried out twice with a very large number of miracidia of Physa sp. As a result, no development of miracidia or sporocysts was seen in the snail at either time.
    The above-mentioned results indicate that no larvae of liver flukes invading L. truncatula and Physa sp. could develop in to rediae or cercariae in the field.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 249-251
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 273-279
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1971 Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 282-294
    Published: May 20, 1971
    Released: June 17, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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