The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Online ISSN : 1349-3329
Print ISSN : 0040-8727
ISSN-L : 0040-8727
Volume 54 , Issue 4
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
  • Toyoji Wada, Tokijiro Sato
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 305-307
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Masahiko Kuroya, Nakao Ishida, Ken Katagiri, Bunji Takahashi, Takehiko ...
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 308
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Tatuzi Suzuki, Kazuo Saito
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 309-312
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    In three dogs, which were anesthetized with evipan-sodium, the suprarenal vein blood was collected through the-lumbar approach. Adrenaline in the blood samples was estimated by means of the rabbit in-testine segment method. The blood sugar and blood pressure were also measured simultaneously.
    Insulin was injected in a dose of 7 units per kg of body weight. During the insulin hypoglycemia, the adrenaline secretion rate was accelerated here in an almost the same degree as in the dog without narcosis.
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  • Hajime Masamune, Masahiro Maki, Noboru Hiyama
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 313-317
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Masahiko Kuroya, Bunji Takahashi, Nakao Ishida, Ken Katagiri, Ihoko Sh ...
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 318
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Hajime Masamune, Syozi Siozima
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 319-326
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    Group A-active preparations of lipid nature have been otbained from the mucosa of pig stomachs and their potency, solubility and composition were investigated. Also trials to disclose the nature of the pure group lipoid from the present source were made.
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  • Hajime Masamune, Syozi Siozima, Azuma Masukawa
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 327-331
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Tatuzi Suzuki, Toshiyuji Ozaki
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 332
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Syozi Siozima
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 333-342
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1) It was tried to separate the blood group lipoids by the aid of organic solvents from human gastric mucosa and gastric cancers.
    2) All of the preparations of the A, B and O group-lipoids had similar composition with respect to N-, P- and carbohydrate-content and similar solubilities.
    3) They rotated D light to the right but slightly.
    4) Group A lipoid from gastric cancer was serologically much less active than the corresponding lipoid from the normal mucosa.
    5) An assumption was expressed that the liver metastasis of gastric cancer contains a group lipoid same as the one in its original growth.
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  • Tatsuzi Suzuki, Kazuo Saito, Yosiakira Kobayasi
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 343-350
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    The suprarenal vein blood was sampled. in non-anesthetized dogs and the adrenaline in the suprarenal vein blood was. estimated by the rabbit intestine segment method. Potassium cyanide was. injected in a dose of 1.0-2.5mg. per kg. intravenously or 1.5-4.0mg. per kg. subcutaneously.
    After injection when the symptoms of cyanide poisoning were mani-fested, the secretion of adrenaline accelerated decidedly. An enormously accelerated adrenaline secretion such as 1.9 γ per kg. per minute was able to observe in the cases, in which potassium cyanide was injected in a dose of 2.0mg. or 2.5mg. per kg. intravenously.
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  • Mei Satake
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 351-353
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Hisayuki Masuda
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 355-362
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    I have described a precise method to measure the intra-gastric and -esophageal temperatures, and by this thermometer the intra-gastric and -esophageal temperatures on 180 healthy adults were simultaneously measured with the axillary. From the obtained results the following facts were confirmed.
    1. The intra-gastric, -esophageal and axillary temperatures exhibit normal distribution.
    2. The three temperatures have mutually distinct differences. The intragastric was 0.2-0.6°C higher than the intraesophageal and the latter was 0.3-1.0°C higher than the axillary.
    3. Among the three temperatures there are mutually positive cor-relations; a strong one between the intragastric and -esophageal, and moderate ones between the axillary and the remaining two.
    4. The intra-gastric and -esophageal temperatures were higher in 'women than men by 0.2-0.4°C, but in the axillary, the difference. between them was not significant.
    5. In the three temperatures there are diurnal variances; being 0.1-0.4°C higher before lunch than breakfast, and 0.2-0.4°C higher before dinner than lunch. The temperature gradient of the three temperatures also vary in the course of a day.
    6. The intra-gastric and -esophageal temperatures were independent on the room temperature but the axillary was 0.2-0.3°C higher in the room temperature of 21-26°C than in one of 10-20°C.
    7. The intra-gastric and -esophageal temperatures have no correlation with the room temperature, but the axillary showed a weak positive correlation with it.
    8. In the same mark the three, temperatures each, vary by. about 1°C from one day to another and the individual variation is most easily observed in the axillary.
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  • Hisayuki Masuda, Mitsuo Ohara
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 363-370
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    The changes of the intragastric temperature of the human body by taking a bath were studied at the four hot-springs of the Narugo Spa. The results of the baths above 40°C were given and the following facts were confirmed.
    1. The intragastric temperature during the bath rises linear with the time.
    2. The rise of the intragastric temperature is high and its direction coefficient is generally proportional to the temperature of the bath.
    3. The type of the rise of the intragastric temperature does not significantly differ according to the kind of spring.
    4. In the alkaline sulphur spring, the maximum rise was highest and the fall after bathing was slowest.
    5. There were no significant differences among the maximum rises of the baths of 15 minutes at 40°C, of 8 at 44°C and of 4 at 47°C, in the sulphate spring. The after-effect of the bath remained proportionally to the temperature of the bath.
    6. The changes of the axillary temperature have the same tendency as those of the intragastric. The maximum rise was about 1.0°C higher and the fall was steeper in the former than in the latter.
    7. The rise of the intragastric temperature by the whole body bath is higher than that by the partial bath of legs.
    8. The fall of the intragastric temperature after bathing is expressed by more than 2 exponential functions.
    In the bath of 37°C in the carbondioxated spring the intragastric temperature at first fell and then rose slowly.
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  • Masahiko Kuroya, Nobuo Ouchi, Masami Kikuchi, Masa Kuroya
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 371-383
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1) Suitable conditions to isolate the strains of actionmyces from soils were studied which were collected from many places throughout all over the territories of Japan, and the asparagine glucose agar of Krainsky was found to be a most suitable isolation medium, because more actionmyces and fewer bacteria grew in it than in the others. The distributions of actinomyces were closely related to the kinds of soil, to their pH, and to the seasons of the sampling.
    2) 1223 strains of actinomyces isolated from soils collect-ed from 188 places were cultivated in several kinds of fluid culture media and the culture filtrates were tested for their inhibitory activities, using mainly Sta. aureus (Terashima strain) as test organisms, and 157 (13%) strains were found to be antagonistic. The above method is well reliable in finding inhibitory strains whose activities were detectable in their culture filtrates. It was not so sensitive, however, to reach a highest detection rate of effective strains.
    3) By the so-called “Cross streak method” 144 (44%) active strains were selected from 261 actinomyces. This method is very simple and sensitive to find many antibiotic strains and to examine a specific “anti-bacterial spectrum.” The development of this task will be reported in the next report.
    4) The representative strains were classified, according to Krainsky and Waksman, into several species by the cultural properties. on several kinds of media. Although a difinite identification of all strains was scarcely possible, many strains were found to belong to Str. roseochromogenus.
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  • Koiti Motokawa
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 385-392
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    Measurement of the electrical excitability of the eye provides a useful means for analyzing visual function. Determination of electric thresholds of the eye necessitates, however, the following special precautions.
    (1) A single constant current pulse of 0.1 sec. in duration is adequate as an electric stimulus, because it can stimulate uniformly all kinds of retinal elements. On the contrary, a brief condenser discharge and alternating currents of definite frequency stimulate selectively a certain kind of element.
    (2) A weak phosphene caused by an electric stimulus near the threshold can hardly be distinguished from intrinsic light of the retina unless the effect of the stimulus in question is compared with that of a stimulus far below the threshold.
    (3) The threshold for disappearance of phosphenes can be determined more accurately than that for appearance.
    (4) Retinal elements of different kind show different thresholds, and this is the most important thing to be borne in mind in determination of the electrical excitability-of the eye following illumination.
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  • Shigeo Okinaka, Kiku Nakao, Masao Ikeda, Kazuo Shizume
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 393-398
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Isamu Kaito, Sigemiti Tuda, Tamotu Numasawa, Tatuo Nakazima
    1951 Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 399-402
    Published: October 25, 1951
    Released: November 28, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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