The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Online ISSN : 1349-3329
Print ISSN : 0040-8727
ISSN-L : 0040-8727
Volume 56 , Issue 4
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
  • Masabiro Tokura
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 307-309
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • M. C. Li
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 310
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Shinji Takahashi, Junnosuke Obara
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 311-317
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Toshiyuki Ozaki
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 318
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Yoshio Kakizaki, Yuji Sato
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 319-321
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Tom Mori
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 322
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Seisyu Sakai
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 323-329
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Ototaka Higashi
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 330
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Shigeaki Yamamoto
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 331-337
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1. I undertook to make a comparative anatomical study of facial nucleus in many kinds of mammalia, at the same time making critical observation on the applicability of the neurobiotaxis theory by Kappers.
    2. In making a serial study of the slides of brain tissue from the caudal up to the cranial side, the facial nucleus appears generally while the solitary nucleus is still visible. I found no case of any remarkable difference among the kinds of observed mammals.
    3. In the observed animals, I found a considerable difference in the development of the pyramidal tract. Yet, the facial nucleus is in all cases invariably situated in the vicinity of the ventral border of the brain. In accordance with the neurobiotaxis theory, the facial nucleus should move from the dorsal to the ventral side under the stimulus from the pyramidal tract. If so, the position of the facial nucleus should show some difference according to the strength of the stimulus from the pyramidal tract, which strength in turn will be obviously determined by the development of the tract. But this is in contradiction to my observations described above. Consequently, the results of my study do not come in support of the neurobiotaxis theory.
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  • Shigeaki Yamamoto
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 339-343
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Kituya Iwama, Mituyosi Abe
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 345-355
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    A salivary conditioned reflex was established in human subjects by applying a metronome beat (conditioned stimulus) and a small amount of acid solution (unconditioned stimulus) successively at an appropriate time interval. The action current. of the parotid was taken as an index of the secretion reflex. Patterns of electroencephalograms were studied n comparison with the parotid activity.
    1. When the conditioning advanced, the parotid showed two successive activities upon the conditioned stimulus alone. The preceding and succeeding responses were called initial and delayed responses respectively.
    2. The delayed response could be regarded as a conditioned reflex, because its latency was almost the same as the time interval between the conditioned and the unconditioned stimulus. The initial response which appeared soon after the onset of the conditioned stimulus could be considered a conditioned reflex, because in our experiment the possibility was completely excluded that the said response might be an unconditioned response to the conditioned stimulus.
    3. The electroencephalography could reveal that the delayed response of the parotid was accompanied with a conditioned cortical excitation while the initial response could not be related to a marked changes in EEG at least in the well-conditioned state.
    4. In the experiment of generalization, it was found that the initial response was more easily generalized than the delayed response.
    5. After the extinction of tl, ie established conditioned reflex had been completed, a procedure of disinhibition was applied. Only the initial response of the parotid was elicited by the conditioned stimulus which was applied following the disinhibiting procedure. The recovery of the abolished delayed response was accomplished after the renewed application of the conditioning procedure.
    6. Nature of the initial and delayed responses was discussed upon the basis of the electroencephalographic findings.
    Our sincere thanks are due to Prof. K. Motokawa for his valuable suggestions and advices during the course of this work.
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  • Masao Miura, Akibumi Komatsu
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 357-360
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    Two cases of hair nevus were reported. The authors studied them chiefly with Bielschowsky-Seto's silver impregnation method. The fact that the hair follicles were usually accompanied by the nerve bundles was clearly recognized.
    Furthermore in our second case, the grandmother had a similartumor in the front of her left tragus in her childhood.
    Thus the authors presumed that hair nevus is not mere invation of epidermis as reported by Fessler but is the inheritable ectodermal teratorn participated by the nervous system.
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  • Chikakuni Watanabe
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 361-371
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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  • Yoshimasa Ushigome
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 373-380
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1. From gastric and intestinal contents at the gastrojejunostomy B. coli and other organisms are cultured in all 66 cases of gastric cancer, and in 60% of 30 gastric ulcer cases, while the kind and quantity of examined organisms in ulcer was less than in cancer.
    2. Although the percentage of positive cultures from the mucous suture was almost the same as that of the gastric and intestinal contents, the positive percentage from the serous suture decreased remarkably both in cancer (positive 52%) and in ulcer (positive 13%).
    3. Duodenal stumps after serous suture were steril in all 29 ulcer cases and in 95% of 42 cancer cases. Even in positive cases of cancer the quantity of organisms was very few.
    4. The microflora contaminating of peritoneum is relatively high at the gastroenterostomy during gastric resection-procedure, but not so high as to produce peritonitis, when the operation was performed carefully.
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  • Shinichi Shida
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 381-386
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1. No remarkable difference was found between Billroth I and II groups concering microorganisms detected in the gastric and duodenal or intestinal contents or from each suture layers of anastomosis after gastric resection in gastric cancer and ulcer.
    2. As for the microorganisms cultured from contents at enterostomy and ileo-colostomy, they increased in kinds but decreased in quantity in the upper part of the intestine while they became fewer in kind in the lower part of the intestine and B. coli increased towards the lower part B. coli was cultured in all cases from the colic contents.
    3. No intimate relation was found between the imperfect suture and the organisms detected at the anastomosis, although 3 cases of suture deficiency were seen in all of the cases and the imperfect suture might be caused by some other factors.
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  • Ryosuke Satoh
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 387-397
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1) Karl Meyer's hyaluronosulfuric acid of cornea and his mucoitin-sulfuric acid of “gastric mucin” were prepared and purified.
    2) Analysis of the former itinsulfuric acid confirmed the result of the author regarding the composition, and moreover the figures obtained by the indole- and orcinol-method pointed to glucuronic acid as the uronic acid component in this polysaccharide.
    3) The latter itinsulfuric acid was suspected not to contain glucuronic acid on rough identification by the analytical way, which rather suggested galacturonic acid. This polysaccharide and its basic disaccharide desaminized were then investigated by chromatography, and the presence of galacturonic acid in them was established.
    4) It was proposed to call the stomach itinsulfuric acid “gastroit-insulfuric acid” and to call the cornea substance mucoitinsulfuric acid.
    The expenses of this work were defrayed by a grant which was given from the Education Department through the Grant. Committee of the Science Council. H. Masamune.
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  • Tatsuo Suzuki
    1952 Volume 56 Issue 4 Pages 399-404
    Published: October 25, 1952
    Released: November 28, 2008
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    1. Blood non-protein nitrogen (N. P. N.) increases after the convulsion in eclampsia, delivery and operation.
    2. a) The rise of N.P.N. after delivery and operation is prevented by phenobarbital.
    b) N.P.N. rises in rabbits remarkably after convulsion by cardiazol but only slightly after convulsion induced by strychnine. And in the latter case, no increase of N. P. N. is noticed at all when the rabbits are treated in advance with phenobarbital.
    c) If rabbits are treated before the strychinine convulsion with chloratum hydratum instead of phenobarbital, N. P. N. -increase is not inhibited, but rather accelerated. To sum up, the behaviour of N. P. N. is mostly controlled by a cerebral center and this center is localized in the cerebral trunk.
    3. Increase of N. P. N. hardly takes place when convulsion is caused by strychnine after previous treatment with phenobarbital or procainum hydrochloricum of hypothalamus, especially of nucleus hypothalamicus ventromedialis or lateralis, in other words, the center in question is most probably in hypothalamus.
    4. When posterior pituitary hormone (Hinterin) or acetylcholine is dropped in nucleus hypothalamicus ventromedialis, no change in N. P. N. is observed. However, if nucleus hypothalamicus lateralis is stimulated in the same manner, N. P. N. increases though slight. Accordingly, the controlling center of N. P. N. must be sought in nucleus hypothalamicus lateralis and its neighbourhood.
    5. The two facts that the controlling center of N. P. N. lies in hypothalamus and that N. P. N. increases after eclampsia convulsion give a support to the claim of Kushima that the center of eclampsia convulsion is situated in hypothalamus.
    I am very grateful to both Profs. Shinoda and Kushima who were kind enough to give me instruction and guidance.
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