The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Online ISSN : 1349-3329
Print ISSN : 0040-8727
ISSN-L : 0040-8727
Volume 246 , Issue 4
December
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Regular Contribution
  • Yeyang Wang, Mingsen Wang, Hongdong Chen, Guitao Li, Wenjun Li, Junnan ...
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 205-212
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 05, 2018
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    Hip fracture is a worldwide medical problem with devastating consequences. Older adults are at higher risk for complications and have more mobility limitation. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of delay in out-of-bed functional exercise on one-year mortality and functional outcomes for elderly patients with hip fracture in China. 1,022 cases of patients with hip fracture who were older than 75 were involved in this retrospective cohort study between 2007 and 2017. One-year mortality, follow up Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score, and Harris hip score were collected. Patients with hip fracture experienced an average of 2.9 days of in-bed functional exercise, 41.4% (n = 423) taken out-of-bed functional exercise within 2 days. A Cox proportional regression model showed that after adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular disease, and urinary disease, delayed out-of-bed functional exercise (> 2 days) associated with higher one-year mortality (OR = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09 to 1.69). Ordinary least squares regression showed that delayed out-of-bed functional exercise associated with worsen ADL scores at 1-month (difference of –3.9 points, 95% CI: –6.4 to –1.7), although the long term ADL scores did not have increased. In addition, there were no associations between out-of-bed functional exercise timing and the Harris hip score at 12 months. In conclusion, in elderly patients with hip fracture in China, delayed out-of-bed functional exercise was not associated with improved Harris hip score, but it was associated with worsen ADL capacities at 1-month postoperatively and higher one-year mortality. The present study emphasizes the benefit of early out-of-bed exercise on the majority of elderly patients with hip fracture.

  • Akihiko Ozaki, Sayaka Horiuchi, Yasuma Kobayashi, Mariko Inoue, Jun Ai ...
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 213-223
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 12, 2018
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    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of social capital on mental health among the Japanese population with or without natural disaster experience. A nationwide cross-sectional study was performed in the population aged 15 to 79 years old. We collected data on psychological status, social capital, disaster experience in ten years prior to the survey, and socio-demographic information. We assessed cognitive social capital (perceptions of support, reciprocity and trust), social support (support from individuals in the community), and social participation (participation in social activities) as components of social capital. The study outcome was mild mood or anxiety disorder (hereafter mood/anxiety disorder), defined as the score of 5 or higher in the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Using logistic regression models, we tested whether each component of social capital was associated with mood/anxiety disorder with or without disaster experience. Out of 1,200 participants, 1,183 had available K6 score data and were considered. Among three components of social capital, only social support significantly interacted with disaster experience (p = 0.019). In the population without disaster experience, those with high social support were less likely to have mood/anxiety disorder (OR 0.45, 95% Cl 0.28-0.73); however, no such association was observed among those with disaster experience (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.64-1.90). Thus, the protective effects of social support against mood/anxiety disorder vary in the Japanese population depending on disaster experience. The present study provides important insight into the role of social capital on mental health after natural disaster.

  • Daisuke Hayashi, Yusaku Akashi, Hiromichi Suzuki, Masanari Shiigai, Ko ...
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 225-231
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 13, 2018
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    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a leading causative pathogen of pneumonia among pediatric patients, and its accurate diagnosis may aid in the selection of appropriate antimicrobial agents. We established a rapid reporting system of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) examination for M. pneumoniae that enables physicians to obtain test results approximately 90 minutes after ordering the test. In this study, we evaluated the impact of this system on antimicrobial prescriptions for pediatric pneumonia patients after its implementation from May 2016 to April 2017. In total, we identified 375 pediatric pneumonia patients, and the results of the rapid PCR examinations for Mycoplasma pneumoniae were reported immediately in 90.7% of patients (340/375), with physicians able to use these results to decide on patients’ management before the prescription of antimicrobial agents. Of the 375 pediatric pneumoniae patients, M. pneumoniae was detected in 223 (59.5%). Among the 223 M. pneumoniae-positive pneumonia cases, antimicrobial agents for atypical pathogens (macrolides, tetracyclines or quinolones) were prescribed in 97.3% (217/223) at the initial evaluation, and their prescription rates increased to 99.1% (221/223) during management. In contrast, antimicrobial agents for atypical pathogens were prescribed only in 10.5% of 152 M. pneumoniae-negative pneumonia cases at the initial evaluations, and only 1 additional case was prescribed clarithromycin for persistent symptoms during management. In conclusion, we show that molecular technology could be applicable in the field of point-of-care testing in infectious disease, and its implementation will ensure the correct antimicrobial prescription for pediatric pneumonia patients.

  • Xiyuan Li, Jie Gu, Yanling Yang, Jun Li, Yanhan Li
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 233-241
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 13, 2018
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    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), a rare autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by renal stones, nephrocalcinosis, and chronic kidney disease. PH1 is caused by defects in alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT, 392 amino-acid residues), which is encoded by the alanine-glyoxylate and serine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AGXT) gene. This study aimed to determine the clinical, biochemical, and mutation spectrum of patients with PH1 from mainland China. Four patients (two adults and two children, age range: 1 to 34 years) from four unrelated families were admitted because of kidney stones. The adult patients had chronic kidney disease, while the pediatric patients retained the normal kidney function. Four mutations of the AGXT gene were detected, including one novel mutation, c.1015delG (p.V339Sfs*2). One adult male with late-onset PH1 is a compound heterozygote of the c.815_816insGA (p.S275Rfs*38) and c.1015delG (p.V339Sfs*2) mutations. These frame-shift mutations could result in the production of truncated AGT proteins. Other patients include an adult female who is heterozygous for c.473C>T (p.S158L) and c.815_816insGA mutations and two boys that are respectively homozygous for the c.815_816insGA mutation and for the c.614C>T (p.S205L) mutation. Thus, the c.815_816insGA mutation accounts for 4/8 alleles in the present study; importantly, the position c.815 represents the 5′-end of the consecutive wild-type sequence of GAGAGAGA. In conclusion, we describe one novel mutation, c.1015delG, and a common mutation, c.815_816insGA, of the AGXT gene among four unrelated families with PH1. Moreover, we suggest that the short repeat of the GA dinucleotide may represent a mutation hotspot in the Chinese population.

Editorial
Regular Contribution
  • Hayder Al-Momen, Majed Kadhim Muhammed, Ali Abdulhussein Alshaheen
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 245-249
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 14, 2018
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    During a daily neonatology practice, seizures are a continuous challenge as a common neurological disease with a wide range of underlying etiologies, and considerable risks of morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to clarify the rate, etiological factors and outcomes of neonatal seizures, and a possible foresight of neonatal death in Iraq. A prospective cohort study was conducted in neonates with seizures admitted to 3 major neonatology centers in Baghdad, Iraq, from 1st of December 2017 till the end of May 2018. Both term and preterm neonates affected by seizures were recruited with a total number of 203 patients. Perinatal asphyxia (n = 81; 39.90%), infection (n = 77; 37.93%), and metabolic abnormalities (n = 52; 25.62%) were most common causes for seizures. Death occurred in 66 neonates (32.51%), with higher mortality rates found in preterm neonates. Six adverse prognostic indicators were shown to be significant: positive pressure resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, perinatal asphyxia, infection, gestational age (preterm babies), and low birth weight (< 2,500 g). Neonatal seizures may be the first manifestation of neurological insults, and they are most commonly caused by perinatal asphyxia, followed by infection, and metabolic disturbances. Prevention of neonatal seizures is much more important than the treatment of them for the reduction of neonatal mortality. The effective strategies should therefore be proper medical care and management for mothers and neonates before, during and after delivery to prevent neonatal infections, perinatal asphyxia, low birth weight, prematurity, metabolic abnormalities, and other risk factors of neonatal seizures.

Case Report
  • Makoto Harada, Tohru Ichikawa, Mamoru Kobayashi
    Type: Case Report
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 251-256
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 15, 2018
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    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a systemic vasculitis resulting in severe organ injuries. ANCA is a disease-labeled antibody of AAV, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 are the main targeted antigens of ANCA. Takotsubo syndrome, a transient cardiac dysfunction caused by emotional or physical stress, is characterized by ST-segment elevation and negative T waves in electrocardiogram, transient left ventricular asynergy, and absence of obstructive coronary disease. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of coexistence of AAV and takotsubo syndrome have been reported. Herein, we report the case of AAV complicated with takotsubo syndrome. A 78-year-old Japanese woman presented with severe renal dysfunction, which was diagnosed as MPO-ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis. Despite the treatment with cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoid, the patient presented with severe respiratory failure due to alveolar hemorrhage and heart failure. Electrocardiography indicated newly developed T wave inversions. Echocardiography demonstrated severe left ventricular dysfunction with hypokinesis of the apical area. Moreover, coronary angiography revealed no noticeable stenotic or obstructive lesions. These findings indicate the onset of takotsubo syndrome. After immunosuppressive therapy, systemic vasculitis and takotsubo syndrome were improved. Although a coexisting case of AAV and takotsubo syndrome is rare, we have to consider the possible complication of takotsubo syndrome in case of presenting acute heart failure. Considering the present case and the previously reported coexisting cases of takotsubo syndrome and AAV, we propose that female sex, initiation of glucocorticoid therapy, and high titer of MPO-ANCA are potential risk factors of developing takotsubo syndrome.

Regular Contribution
  • Megumi Hayashi, Yoshinari Morimoto, Takatoshi Iida, Yohei Tanaka, Shun ...
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 257-264
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 18, 2018
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    Bone-modifying or antiresorptive agents that target osteoclasts, such as bisphosphonates, are known to cause delayed wound healing and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) following tooth extraction. However, there are no data on whether such adverse events are also caused by drugs that may suppress the immune system, including corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, biological agents, and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the incidence of delayed post-extraction wound healing and identify risk factors among patients treated with potential immunosuppressive drugs undergoing tooth extraction. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 101 patients by reviewing their medical records. The underlying diseases of the enrolled patients included dilated cardiomyopathy, hematological malignancy, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The sample comprised 131 cases of tooth extraction among the 101 patients; delayed post-extraction wound healing occurred in 10 patients (12 cases, 9.2%), including ONJ in three patients (3 cases, 2.3%). The surgical tooth extraction performed for impacted teeth or a residual root (P = 0.009), the number of surgical tooth extraction (P = 0.012), decreased lymphocyte counts (P = 0.008), and decreased eosinophil counts (P = 0.009) were significantly related to delayed wound healing. Thus, among patients taking corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, biological agents, and/or DMARDs, there is a risk of delayed wound healing and ONJ. Moreover, the significant risk factors are low lymphocyte counts, low eosinophil counts, and surgical extraction. It is of particular importance to prevent surgical site infection, when the high-risk patients undergo tooth extraction.

  • Kento Mori, Toshihiko Goto, Junki Yamamoto, Keisuke Muto, Shohei Kikuc ...
    Type: Regular Contribution
    2018 Volume 246 Issue 4 Pages 265-274
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 20, 2018
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    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an exacerbating factor for exercise tolerance due to the loss of atrial kick. However, many patients with permanent AF, which lasts for at least a year without interruption, and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 50%) are asymptomatic and have good exercise tolerance. In such cases, the possible mechanism that compensates for the decrease in cardiac output accompanying the loss of atrial kick is a sufficient increase in heart rate (HR) during exercise. We investigated the relationship between exercise tolerance and peak HR during exercise using cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 242 male patients with preserved LVEF, 214 with sinus rhythm (SR) and 28 with permanent AF. Peak HR was significantly higher in the AF group than the SR group (148.9 ± 41.9 vs. 132.0 ± 22.0 beats/min, p = 0.001). However, oxygen uptake at peak exercise did not differ between the AF and SR groups (19.4 ± 5.7 vs. 21.6 ± 6.0 mL/kg/min, p = 0.17). In multiple regression analysis, peak HR (β, 0.091; p < 0.001) and the interaction term constructed by peak HR and presence of permanent AF (β, 0.05; p = 0.04) were selected as determinants for peak VO2; however, presence of permanent AF was not selected (β, −0.38; p = 0.31). Therefore, the impact of peak HR on exercise tolerance differed between the AF and SR groups, suggesting that a sufficient increase in HR during exercise is an important factor to preserve exercise tolerance among patients with AF.

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